Brain for Speech: A View from Evolutionary Neuroanatomy 1st ed. 2017 [Kõva köide]

  • Formaat: Hardback, 505 pages, kõrgus x laius: 210x148 mm, kaal: 816 g, 22 Illustrations, black and white; XXIV, 505 p. 22 illus.
  • Ilmumisaeg: 06-Jun-2017
  • Kirjastus: Palgrave Macmillan
  • ISBN-10: 1137540591
  • ISBN-13: 9781137540591
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  • Formaat: Hardback, 505 pages, kõrgus x laius: 210x148 mm, kaal: 816 g, 22 Illustrations, black and white; XXIV, 505 p. 22 illus.
  • Ilmumisaeg: 06-Jun-2017
  • Kirjastus: Palgrave Macmillan
  • ISBN-10: 1137540591
  • ISBN-13: 9781137540591

This book discusses evolution of the human brain, the origin of speech and language. It covers past and present perspectives on the contentious issue of the acquisition of the language capacity. Divided into two parts, this insightful work covers several characteristics of the human brain including the language-specific network, the size of the human brain, its lateralization of functions and interhemispheric integration, in particular the phonological loop. Aboitiz argues that it is the phonological loop that allowed us to increase our vocal memory capacity and to generate a shared semantic space that gave rise to modern language. The second part examines the neuroanatomy of the monkey brain, vocal learning birds like parrots, emergent evidence of vocal learning capacities in mammals, mirror neurons, and the ecological and social context in which speech evolved in our early ancestors. This book's interdisciplinary topic will appeal to scholars of psychology, neuroscience, linguistics, biology and history.

Muu info

"The evolution of human speech processing has been discussed from many perspectives...Aboitiz, a leading expert on human anatomy, now offers a welcome and well-written perspective that builds on deep knowledge of anatomic detail to argue how human speech and language may arise from the cognitive and sensorimotor building blocks underpinning hominid evolution. The evolutionary narrative developed provides a provocative angle on how the domains of gesture, speech, and working memory interact in the evolution of speech." (David Poeppel - Director, Department of Neuroscience, Max-Planck-Institute, Frankfurt & Professor of Psychology and Neural Science, New York University) "Francisco Aboitiz's masterly "A Brain for Speech" will be obligatory reading for all those interested in language evolution who wish to take the brain seriously. It combines comparative neuroanatomy, detailed historical reviews, and a thorough assessment of rival theories while placing special emphasis on the phonological loop." (Michael A. Arbib - Professor of Biological Sciences, Biomedical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Neuroscience and Psychology at the University of Southern California) "Aboitiz takes a broad journey through contemporary Neuroscience spanning from molecular mechanisms of brain development to neuropsychology of memory and evolution. The target is language, one of the most enigmatic faculties of the brain, possibly defining the human being, while defying his understanding. The outcome is an interesting perspective on where Neuroscience might be heading." (Giorgio Innocenti - Department of Neuroscience, Research group Carlen, Karolinska Institutet Sweden)
1 Introduction: The Beginning of Words
1(40)
Darwin, Broca and the Human Brain
4(2)
Did Language Evolve?
6(2)
Deep Structures
8(3)
Shared or Unique?
11(3)
Experiments on Recursion
14(4)
Pidgins and Creoles
18(4)
Toward Biology
22(4)
Our Family
26(5)
This Book
31(2)
References
33(8)
Part I A Special Brain
2 Pandora's Box
41(44)
White Matter, Gray Matter
42(1)
The Power of the Microscope
43(5)
Broca's Brains
48(3)
Comprehending Speech
51(4)
The Disconnection Syndrome
55(4)
The Imaging Revolution
59(4)
Resting Brains
63(2)
The Language Network Updated
65(4)
Connecting it All
69(3)
Brain Waves
72(5)
References
77(8)
3 A Matter of Size
85(46)
Brain and Body
86(4)
The Anatomy of Intelligence
90(3)
Wrinkled Brains
93(4)
Cell Counts
97(3)
How to Build a Big Brain
100(5)
The Brain Hangs Together
105(2)
Specialist Brains
107(2)
The Cortical Mosaic
109(5)
Primates Are Different (Again)
114(2)
Increase Brain Power, Not Cell Numbers
116(4)
References
120(11)
4 Broken Symmetry
131(42)
Two Minds
132(7)
Lateralization is Complex
139(4)
Connectivity Within or Between?
143(2)
From Function to Form
145(5)
Monkeying with Brain Dominance
150(2)
Throwing with the Right
152(3)
Man the Toolmaker
155(3)
Whence Asymmetry?
158(6)
References
164(9)
5 Bridging Hemispheres
173(38)
Holding the Hemispheres Together
174(3)
Mammals Are More Connected
177(3)
160 Million Fibers
180(2)
The Zipper Hypothesis
182(3)
Moving Maps to the Cortex
185(5)
Transferring Sounds
190(3)
Time is of the Essence
193(4)
Travelling Waves
197(3)
Integrating Speech, Emotion and Meaning
200(3)
References
203(8)
6 A Loop for Speech
211(38)
Memento
212(4)
Baddeley's Memories
216(4)
Images of Memory
220(3)
Boxes or Networks?
223(7)
Tracking Sentences
230(5)
The Loop is for Learning
235(3)
Amplified Working Memory
238(3)
References
241(8)
Part II Before Speech
7 Monkey Brain, Human Brain
249(38)
The Visual Paradigm
250(7)
Mapping Memory
257(6)
The Search for Homology
263(5)
The Paths of Sound
268(3)
From Ape to Human
271(2)
Function and Behavior
273(2)
A Key Innovation
275(3)
References
278(9)
8 Grasping Mirrors
287(42)
Ancestral Gestures
288(1)
Neuronal Reflections
289(2)
Human Mirrors
291(4)
Simulations, Associations or Predictions?
295(3)
Copycats
298(5)
Rebirth of a Theory
303(4)
The Devil is in the Details
307(1)
Protosigns and Protospeech
308(6)
The Chicken or the Egg?
314(5)
References
319(10)
9 Of Birds and Men
329(46)
Dinosaurs All Around
330(2)
Sniffing and Whisking
332(4)
The Thorniest Problem of Comparative Neuroanatomy
336(8)
Canonical Circuits
344(2)
The Raven Said, Nevermore
346(2)
Crows vs Chimps
348(6)
Talking and Singing
354(7)
The Grammar of Birds
361(3)
References and Notes
364(11)
10 Talking Heads
375(50)
Vocal Beasts
376(3)
Noisy Primates
379(4)
Neanderthal Throats
383(2)
Read My Lips
385(2)
The Origin of Rhythm
387(3)
The Melodic Ape
390(2)
From Meaning to Grammar
392(3)
Down from the Cortex
395(5)
Look Who's Talking
400(5)
Gene Tracks
405(4)
Beyond Genetics
409(2)
References and Notes
411(14)
11 Taming Ourselves
425(42)
The Brain in Society
426(4)
Mind Readers
430(6)
The Pleasure of Being Together
436(4)
Rewarding Circuits
440(4)
Autism or Liking Versus Wanting
444(5)
The Prince and the Fox
449(7)
The Peter Pan Syndrome
456(2)
References and Notes
458(9)
12 Epilogue
467(4)
Reference
469(2)
Author Index 471(10)
Subject Index 481
Francisco Aboitiz is Professor of the Psychiatry Department at the Medical School, and Director of the Interdisciplinary Neuroscience Center at the Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile. He has published more than 100 scientific papers on evolution, neuroscience and neuropsychiatry.

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