How to Grow a Playspace: Development and Design [Kõva köide]

  • Formaat: Hardback, 366 pages, kõrgus x laius: 246x174 mm, 92 black & white halftones, 13 black & white line drawings
  • Ilmumisaeg: 07-Apr-2017
  • Kirjastus: Routledge
  • ISBN-10: 1138906549
  • ISBN-13: 9781138906549
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  • Formaat: Hardback, 366 pages, kõrgus x laius: 246x174 mm, 92 black & white halftones, 13 black & white line drawings
  • Ilmumisaeg: 07-Apr-2017
  • Kirjastus: Routledge
  • ISBN-10: 1138906549
  • ISBN-13: 9781138906549
Teised raamatud teemal:

How to Grow a Playspace takes you through a global perspective of the different stages of child development and the environments that engage children in play around the world. From the urbanity of Mumbai; to rainbow nets in Japan; nature play in Denmark; recycling waste in Peru; community building in Uganda; play streets in London and gardens of peace in Palestine, How to Grow A Playspace proves that no matter where play occurs, it is ubiquitous in its resourcefulness, imagination and effect.

Written by leading international academics, designers and playworkers in the field of play, How to Grow A Playspace discusses contemporary issues around children and play, from risky play to creativity and technology, to insights into children’s thinking, social inclusion and what makes a city child-friendly.

With its own ‘Potting Shed’, this text is also a practical guide to support playspace projects with advice on teams, budgets, community engagement, maintenance and standards. How to Grow A Playspace is a comprehensive ‘go-to’ guide for anyone interested or involved with children’s play and playspaces.

Dedication and acknowledgements xi
List of contributors
xii
Part I GROUND
An Introduction 3(10)
Elizabeth Cummins
Katherine Masiulanis
Part II SOWING
1 A history of playspaces
13(8)
Dr Carla Pascoe
2 Fundamental perceptions of and ingredients for play: Having fun, opening up and letting go
21(6)
Elizabeth Cummins
3 Insights into the mind of the child
27(10)
Tracy R. Gleason
Becky L. Geer
4 Play environments and affordances
37(12)
Elizabeth Cummins
Zahra Zamani
5 Chaos and confusion: The clash between adults' and children's spaces
49(6)
Katherine Masiulanis
6 City play
55(10)
Elger Blitz
Hannah Schubert
7 Of agency, participation and design: Two contrasting play scenarios in Indian cities
65(8)
Mukta Naik
8 Designing inclusive playspaces
73(6)
Katherine Masiulanis
9 Glenallen School
79(18)
Mary Jeavons
Part III SEEDLINGS
10 Child development
97(8)
Elizabeth Cummins
Katherine Masiulanis
11 The natural environment as playspace
105(10)
Helle Nebelong
12 Planting for children's play
115(14)
John Rayner
13 Introducing water play environments to Early Years settings
129(8)
Theresa Casey
Margaret Westwood
14 The development of forest school in the UK
137(10)
Christina Dee
15 Children's gardens: A tale of two cities
147(8)
Andrew Laidlaw
16 Reflections on designing Lafayette Park playground
155(12)
Jeffrey Miller
Part IV SPROUTS
17 Child development
167(8)
Elizabeth Cummins
Katherine Masiulanis
Playspaces and art
18 Colours and materials
175(6)
Katherine Masiulanis
19 Embedded art in playspaces
181(8)
Dorelle Davidson
20 Child led creativity
189(6)
Matthew Shaw
21 Art as playspace
195(12)
Toshiko
Charles MacAdam
Schools
22 Quintessential play patterns in schools: The interface of space, materials and play behaviour
207(12)
Mary Jeavons
23 When is a slide not a slide? (Or what if we think differently about and beyond design?)
219(8)
Dr Wendy Russell
24 `This place is like a building site...'
227(8)
Judi Legg
25 The stepping stones to many playgrounds
235(16)
Carla
Tom Gill
Part V SAPLINGS
26 Child development
251(6)
Elizabeth Cummins
Katherine Masiulanis
27 Beyond 14+ years
257(8)
Gabrielle McKinnon
Alasdair Roy
28 Technology in playspaces: A snapshot
265(2)
Katherine Masiulanis
29 Lima and the ever-postponed electric train
267(8)
Basurama
30 Be not afeared: Embracing the need for risk in play
275(12)
Bernard Speigel
31 Not in my front garden! Play Streets: A doorstep controversy
287(10)
Paul Hocker
32 We are such stuff as dreams are made on: Paraphrased conversation with Mark Halden, Senior Playworker, Glamis Adventure Playground
297(14)
Penny Wilson
Part VI THE POTTING SHED
33 The team
311(2)
Katherine Masiulanis
34 Tin tacks -- budgeting and resources
313(4)
Elizabeth Cummins
35 Social and environmental responsibilities
317(4)
Katherine Masiulanis
36 Site analysis and opportunities for play
321(2)
Katherine Masiulanis
37 Playspaces and community engagement
323(4)
Elizabeth Cummins
38 Insight into playground manufacturers
327(2)
Katherine Masiulanis
39 Staging
329(2)
Elizabeth Cummins
40 Planting maintenance
331(2)
Katherine Masiulanis
41 Maintenance and longevity
333(2)
Elizabeth Cummins
42 Supporting infrastructure
335(2)
Katherine Masiulanis
43 Standards and regulations (general and best practice principles)
337(4)
Paul Grover
Conclusion 341(2)
Elizabeth Cummins
Katherine Masiulanis
Index 343
Katherine Masiulanis (AILA) is a registered landscape architect based in Melbourne, Australia. She is the Director of Leaf Design Studio, which specialises in combining landscape architecture with interpretive design. Having started her career as an industrial designer, she has a broad base of design skills. Katherine has worked on the design of play environments since 1998 in various capacities, allowing her to complete many award-winning designs. She has a particular interest in the enrichment of play with sculptural and artistic elements, and in creating sites which relate their unique stories. www.leafdesignstudio.com.au Elizabeth Cummins is a qualified landscape architect (Bachelor of Design 1st Class Hons, RMIT 2001) and educator (Diploma of Teaching Early Childhood, Monash University 1989). Beginning her professional life as an early childhood teacher in the early 1990s, Elizabeth has worked as both a pre-school and primary educator in Australia, the UK and Japan. After qualifying as a landscape architect, Elizabeth worked professionally with Jeavons Landscape Architects for almost six years and has lectured and tutored at RMIT University, Melbourne. Elizabeth has also spent many years working in and for local government. In 2011 Elizabeth branched out to take her own creative project direction, called Bricolage Design. Bricolage specialises in design and strategic planning, particularly for children's environments. Elizabeth is a founding coordinator of the Creative Cubby Project, a local initiative to encourage creative play for children by building temporary cubby houses using cardboard boxes and recycled materials. Elizabeth is also a passionate advocate for quality play and the right of children to be independently mobile and able to freely and actively explore and engage in their local neighbourhoods. She is a member of Play Australia and in 2015 co-authored their guide to risk benefit assessment, 'Getting the Balance Right'. Elizabeth blogs regularly on play and projects for children. www.bricolagedesign.com.au/leafgenius