Image and Mind: Film, Philosophy and Cognitive Science [Pehme köide]

  • Formaat: Paperback, 332 pages, kõrgus x laius x paksus: 228x152x19 mm, kaal: 490 g, black & white illustrations
  • Ilmumisaeg: 26-Dec-2007
  • Kirjastus: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN-10: 0521057787
  • ISBN-13: 9780521057783
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  • Formaat: Paperback, 332 pages, kõrgus x laius x paksus: 228x152x19 mm, kaal: 490 g, black & white illustrations
  • Ilmumisaeg: 26-Dec-2007
  • Kirjastus: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN-10: 0521057787
  • ISBN-13: 9780521057783
Teised raamatud teemal:
This is a book about the nature of film: about the nature of moving images, about the viewer's relation to film, and about the kinds of narrative that film is capable of presenting. It represents a very decisive break with the semiotic and psychoanalytic theories of film which have dominated discussion. The central thesis is that film is essentially a pictorial medium and that the movement of film images is real rather than illusory. A general theory of pictorial representation is presented, which insists on the realism of pictures and the impossibility of assimilating them to language. It criticizes attempts to explain the psychology of film viewing in terms of the viewer's imaginary occupation of a position within the world of film. On the contrary, film viewing is nearly always impersonal.

Arvustused

"Currie is often provocative, as when he analyzes the nature of film images and when he criticizes the theory of 'suture.'" Choice "In this important and impressive book, Gregory Currie tackles several fundamental topics in the philosophy of film and says much of general interest about the nature of imagination...Currie's book is a major contribution to the developing field of the philosophy of film, and also has important things to say about aesthetics and the philosophy of mind. It deserves to be widely read and admired." Berys Gaut, The Philosophical Review

Preface xi
Acknowledgements xxi
Film, 1895-1995 xxiii
Introduction: the essence of cinema 1
1.1 Film as representation
2
1.2 Film and the visible
3
1.3 Degrees of inessentialness
6
1.4 The visible and the pictorial
7
1.5 Fictional pictures
9
1.6 Documentary and fiction
12
Part I Representation in film
Chapter 1 The myth of illusion
19
1.1 Transparency, likeness and illusionism
19
1.2 Cognitive illusions
22
1.3 Film and dreaming
27
1.4 Perceptual illusionism
28
1.5 The reality of cinematic images
30
1.6 On the motion of images
34
1.7 Two ways or three?
42
Chapter 2 The imprint of nature
48
2.1 Representational media and representational Arts
49
2.2 Presenting and representing
49
2.3 Photographs as evidence
52
2.4 Counterfactual dependence
53
2.5 Inconclusive arguments
56
2.6 The conditions for perception
61
2.7 Putting movement in the picture
69
2.8 The significance of similarity
70
2.9 The aesthetics of photography
72
2.10 Photography, painting and the real
75
Chapter 3 Realism
79
3.1 Depictions
80
3.2 Natural generativity
88
3.3 Nondepictive representation in film and other media
90
3.4 Three kinds of temporality
92
3.5 Representing time by means of time
96
3.6 Spatial representation
103
3.7 Realist film style
106
3.8 The relativity of likeness
108
Chapter 4 Languages of art and languages of film
113
4.1 Finding the thesis
114
4.2 Cinema language and natural language
117
4.3 The shape of natural language
120
4.4 Objections rejected
124
4.5 Interpretation and utterance meaning
126
4.6 Confusions about convention
128
4.7 Relations between images
134
4.8 A language of vision?
136
Part II Imagination
Chapter 5 Imagination, the general theory
141
5.1 Perspective shifts
142
5.2 Simulation
144
5.3 Fiction and two kinds of simulation
152
5.4 Consequences
155
5.5 The dangers of imagining
162
Chapter 6 Imagination, personal and impersonal
164
6.1 The classical theory
165
6.2 Cinema, theatre and other visual fictions
168
6.3 Against imagining seeing
170
6.4 Impersonal imagining and film
179
6.5 Perceptual imagining
181
6.6 Clarifications and rebuttals
185
6.7 The myth of total cinema
191
6.8 Psychologism
193
6.9 Iconic signs
196
Chapter 7 Travels in narrative time
198
7.1 Tense in film
198
7.2 The proper treatment of anachrony
206
7.3 Is this revisionism?
216
Appendix: anachrony and ellipsis
219
Part III Interpretation
Chapter 8 The interpretive problem
225
8.1 Intersubjective agreement and interpretive principles
226
8.2 Terms and conditions
231
8.3 Interpreting behaviour and interpreting works
235
8.4 Interpreting works as interpreting behaviour
239
8.5 Real authors, implied authors
243
8.6 Why we still need intention
247
8.7 Interpretive deadlock and truth
249
8.8 The evidence for a cinematic interpretation
251
8.9 Implied author and auteur
258
8.10 Structure and function
259
Chapter 9 Narrative and narrators
260
9.1 Implied authors and narrators
261
9.2 The asymmetry between literature and film
265
9.3 Kinds of unreliability
270
9.4 Ambiguous and unreliable narratives
272
In conclusion 281
Named propositions 283
Bibliography 285
Index 297