E-raamat: Instrumentalists and Renaissance Culture, 1420-1600: Players of Function and Fantasy

(Boston University), (University of New Hampshire)
  • Formaat: 345 pages, 28 b/w illus.
  • Ilmumisaeg: 26-May-2016
  • Kirjastus: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN-13: 9781316573105
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  • Formaat: 345 pages, 28 b/w illus.
  • Ilmumisaeg: 26-May-2016
  • Kirjastus: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN-13: 9781316573105

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This innovative and multi-layered study of the music and culture of Renaissance instrumentalists spans the early institutionalization of instrumental music from c.1420 to the rise of the basso continuo and newer roles for instrumentalists around 1600. Employing a broad cultural narrative interwoven with detailed case studies, close readings of eighteen essential musical sources, and analysis of musical images, Victor Coelho and Keith Polk show that instrumental music formed a vital and dynamic element in the artistic landscape, from rote function to creative fantasy. Instrumentalists occupied a central role in courtly ceremonies and private social rituals during the Renaissance, and banquets, dances, processions, religious celebrations and weddings all required their participation, regardless of social class. Instrumental genres were highly diverse artistic creations, from polyphonic repertories revealing knowledge of notated styles, to improvisation and flexible practices. Understanding the contributions of instrumentalists is essential for any accurate assessment of Renaissance culture.
List of figures
xi
Preface and acknowledgments xiv
List of abbreviations
xvii
Prologue: The culture of Renaissance instrumental music 1(16)
Patronage, population, and printing
3(2)
Perspectives on Renaissance sound and context
5(2)
The combination of voices and instruments
7(1)
Case study 1 Josquin in the instrumental repertory of the Renaissance
8(6)
Renaissance instrumental music and periodization
14(3)
1 Renaissance instrumental music and its patrons
17(45)
Patrons and professionals
17(1)
Burgundy: the model of power -- 1400--77
18(1)
Case study 2 Magnificent Burgundy: instrumental music during the reign of Philip the Good
19(3)
The Burgundian model expands -- 1480--1520
22(3)
Maximilian I -- Ercole d'Este -- Henry VII
25(2)
The Burgundian model transcended -- 1520--50
27(1)
Case study 3 Patronage runs rampant: instrumental music at the court of Henry VIII
28(4)
Francis I -- Charles V
32(2)
A new model of power: Bavaria -- 1550--1600
34(2)
Church patronage of instrumental music
36(1)
The fifteenth century: instrumental music through back alleys
37(4)
The sixteenth century: doors open to instrumental music
41(1)
Case study 4 Renaissance instrumentalists in the New World and cross-cultural encounters
42(7)
Civic patronage in the fifteenth century
49(1)
Germany and Italy -- Flanders and England -- France and Spain
50(5)
Civic patronage in the sixteenth century
55(1)
Case study 5 Players and politics: Tielman Susato and the Antwerp Band, c.1550
55(3)
Size matters
58(4)
2 A source-based history of Renaissance instrumental music
62(69)
1) A variable repertory for instrumentalists: Faenza, Biblioteca comunale 117 (c. 1380--1426) -- Faenza
64(2)
2) Zorzi Trombetta and a watershed moment for ensemble instrumental music: London, British Library, Cotton MS Titus A. xxvi (c.1440) -- Zorzi
66(3)
3) A compendium of fifteenth-century keyboard techniques: The Buxheim Organ Book, Munich, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, Cim. 352b (formerly Mus.ms. 3725), (c. 1460--70) -- Buxheim
69(2)
4) Ensemble instrumental music moves to center stage: Rome, Biblioteca Casanatense, MS 2856 (c. 1481--90?) -- Casanatense
71(5)
5) A tipping point for instrumental music: Petrucci's Harmonice musices Odhecaton A (Venice, 15010 -- Odhecaton
76(2)
6) The end of the beginning of lute music: Francesco Spinacino, Intabulatura de Lauto Libro primo/Libro secondo (Venice, 15072) -- Spinacino
78(7)
7) The chanson tradition challenged: Augsburg, Staats- und Stadtbibliothek MS 2° 142a (c.1510) -- Augsburg
85(4)
8) Introducing the tre corone of Renaissance lute music: Giovanni Antonio Casteliono, Intabolatura di leuto de diversi autori (Milan, 15369) -- Casteliono
89(5)
9) Professionals at work: Copenhagen, Det kongelige Bibliotek, Gl.Kgl.Sml. 1872 -- 4° (c. 1545) -- Copenhagen
94(3)
10) Alonso Mudarra, Tres libros de musica en cifras para vihuela (Seville, 154614) -- Tres libros
97(3)
11) Dances for musical recreation: Tielman Susato's Het derde musyck boexken... danserye (Antwerp, 15518) -- Danserye
100(4)
12) Practice meets theory: Vincenzo Galilei's Intavolature de lauto (Rome, 15637) and Fronimo Dialogo (Venice, 15682/15845)
104(5)
13) Keyboard music in Venice: Claudio Merulo, Ricercari d'intavolatura d'organo (Venice, 15672) -- Ricercari
109(4)
14) International repertory on the periphery: Lerma, Archivo de San Pedro, MS. Mus. 1 (c.1590) -- Lerma 1
113(3)
15) Per sonare, non cantare: Giovanni Gabrieli, Sacrae symphoniae (Venice, 15975)
116(4)
16) Viols, voices, and instrumental music in Elizabethan England: William Byrd, Psalmes, Sonets, & songs... made into Musicke of five parts (London, 15882)
120(3)
17) Insular genius at work: Fitzwilliam Virginal Book, Cambridge, Fitzwilliam Museum, Music MS 168 (c.1615--20) - Fitzwilliam
123(3)
18) The magnificent close: Robert Dowland, A Varietie of Lute Lessons (London, 1610) -- Varietie
126(5)
3 The players
131(33)
The daily life of an instrumentalist: conditions of work
132(2)
Income and benefits
134(5)
Guilds and education
139(2)
Case study 6 An artist in his own words: Benvenuto Cellini on the training and early career of an instrumentalist
141(5)
Recruiting professionals
146(2)
Professional players and their origins
148(2)
Case study 7 The cieco miracoloso: Conrad Paumann
150(4)
Female instrumentalists
154(2)
Amateurs
156(3)
Case study 8 Two Renaissance playlists: the lutebooks of Raffaello Cavalcanti (Cavalcanti) and Emanuel Wurstisen (Wurstisen)
159(5)
4 Instrumental music for celebration and ceremony
164(25)
Festivals
165(1)
Case study 9 Music and political ceremony: the ritual granting of privileges and forgiveness, Bruges, 16 May 1488
166(3)
The wedding as festival
169(1)
Case study 10 Taste and magnificence entwined: the Bavarian wedding of 1568
169(2)
Processions
171(2)
Instrumental music and banquets
173(1)
Case study 11 Pressing the boundaries of extravagance: the Feast of the Pheasant -- Lille, 1454
174(3)
Dance and its context
177(3)
Music in the theater
180(4)
Instrumental music in sacred celebrations
184(5)
5 The instrumentalist's workshop: pedagogy, intabulation, and compositional process
189(37)
Instruction, composition, and performance in the fifteenth century
191(2)
Permanence and evanescence in fifteenth-century composition
193(3)
Case study 12 The theorist speaks: Tinctoris on counterpoint, res facta, and singing super librum
196(12)
Learning the basics
199(4)
Acquiring skill on an instrument
203(1)
Performing the repertory
204(1)
Performance practice and instrumentalists, 1400--1500
205(3)
Instruction, composition, and performance in the sixteenth century
208(12)
Learning the basics
209(3)
Composition and arrangement
212(1)
Intabulations and the musical text
213(4)
Renaissance translations
217(3)
Case study 13 Intabulations as translations: Etienne Dolet's De la maniere de bien traduire d'une langue en autre (1540)
220(4)
Convergence of instrumentalist and composer
224(2)
6 Renaissance instruments: images and realities
226(70)
Challenges to invention
227(1)
Economics, distribution, and ownership
228(4)
An image-based history
232(60)
I Plucked-string instruments
233(1)
Gittern
234(3)
Lute: fifteenth century
237(2)
Lute: sixteenth century
239(3)
Vihuela
242(3)
Renaissance guitar
245(2)
Harp
247(3)
Psaltery and dulcimer
250(2)
II Bowed string instruments
252(1)
Fiddle
252(2)
Rebec
254(1)
Viols
255(3)
Violins
258(3)
III.1 Keyboard instruments
261(1)
Organ
261(2)
Portative organ
263(1)
Positive organ
264(1)
Regal
265(1)
III.2 Keyboard string instruments
266(1)
Clavichord
267(2)
Harpsichord
269(3)
Virginals and other string keyboards
272(1)
IV Wind instruments
273(1)
Shawm and bombard: early fifteenth century
273(2)
A slide trumpet?
275(1)
The bagpipe, pipe and tabor, and doucaine
276(2)
The wind band c. 1500
278(1)
Cornetts and trombones
279(2)
Recorders
281(1)
Crumhorns
282(1)
Flute
283(2)
Wind band with shawms: late sixteenth century
285(1)
Trumpets: early fifteenth century
286(3)
Trumpets: sixteenth century
289(3)
Epilogue: function and fantasy
292(4)
Bibliography 296(22)
Index of primary sources 318(4)
General Index 322
Victor Coelho is Professor of Music and Director of the Center for Early Music Studies at Boston University. A Fellow of Villa I Tatti, the Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies in Florence, his books include Music and Science in the Age of Galileo, The Manuscript Sources of Seventeenth-Century Italian Lute Music, Performance on Lute, Guitar, and Vihuela, and The Cambridge Companion to the Guitar. In 2000 he received the Noah Greenberg Award given by the American Musicological Society for outstanding contributions to the performance of early music, resulting in a recording (with Alan Curtis) that won a Prelude Classical Award in 2004. His recordings as lutenist and director appear on the Stradivarius, Toccata Classics and Teldec labels. Keith Polk is a Professor Emeritus at the University of New Hampshire, and has also taught at Brandeis University, the New England Conservatory, and Regents College, London. He is one of the foremost authorities on Renaissance instrumental music, and has produced numerous articles and several books on the subject, including German Instrumental Music of the Late Middle Ages (Cambridge, 1992). He is also a professional player of the French horn, having performed with the San Diego Symphony, the Amsterdam Concertgebouw Orchestra, Boston Baroque, and the Smithsonian Chamber Players. His Festschrift, Instruments, Ensembles, and Repertory, 1300-1600, edited by Timothy McGee and Stewart Carter, was published in 2013.