Narratives and Narrators: A Philosophy of Stories [Pehme köide]

  • Formaat: Paperback, 264 pages, kõrgus x laius x paksus: 234x157x14 mm, kaal: 380 g, black & white illustrations
  • Ilmumisaeg: 02-Feb-2012
  • Kirjastus: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN-10: 0199645280
  • ISBN-13: 9780199645282
Teised raamatud teemal:
  • Formaat: Paperback, 264 pages, kõrgus x laius x paksus: 234x157x14 mm, kaal: 380 g, black & white illustrations
  • Ilmumisaeg: 02-Feb-2012
  • Kirjastus: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN-10: 0199645280
  • ISBN-13: 9780199645282
Teised raamatud teemal:
Gregory Currie offers a reflection on the nature and significance of narrative in human communication. He shows that narratives are devices for manifesting the intentions of their makers in stories, argues that human tendencies to imitation and to joint attention underlie the pleasure of narrative, and discusses authorship, character, and irony.

Narratives are artefacts of a special kind: they are intentionally crafted devices which fulfil their story-telling function by manifesting the intentions of their makers. But narrative itself is too inclusive a category for much more to be said about it than this; we should focus attention instead on the vaguely defined but interesting category of things rich in narrative structure. Such devices offer significant possibilities, not merely for the representation of stories, but for the expression of point of view; they have also played an important role in the evolution of reliable communication. Narratives and narrators argues that much of the pleasure of narrative communication depends on deep-seated and early developing tendencies in human beings to imitation and to joint attention, and imitation turns out to be the key to understanding such important literary techniques as free indirect discourse and character-focused narration. The book also examines irony in narrative, with an emphasis on the idea of the expression of ironic points of view. It looks closely at the idea of character, or robust, situation-independent ways of acting and thinking, as it is represented in narrative. It asks whether scepticism about the notion of character should have us reassess the dramatic and literary tradition which places such emphasis on character.

Arvustused

a rich study. * Adriana Boneta,Year's Work in Critical and Cultural Theory * Rich with examples drawn from both literature and film ... the book makes an interesting and important contribution not only to our understanding of the nature of narratives but also to the nature of our engagement with them. * Amy Kind, The Philosophical Quarterly *

1 Representation
1(26)
1.1 Artefactual Functions
1(6)
1.2 Narrative and Story Content
7(5)
1.3 Implicit and Explicit
12(9)
1.4 Nature's Narratives?
21(4)
1.5 Implied Authors
25(1)
1.6 Looking Ahead
26(1)
2 The Content of Narrative
27(22)
2.1 Causes
27(6)
2.2 Narrativity
33(3)
2.3 Weighing Factors
36(3)
2.4 Causal History
39(2)
2.5 Coincidence and Humean Cause
41(1)
2.6 Salient Possibilities
42(7)
Appendix: Cheap Talk and Costly Signals
43(6)
3 Two Ways of Looking at a Narrative
49(16)
3.1 Limits to the Content Approach to Narrative
50(2)
3.2 Telling the Time in Marienbad
52(2)
3.3 Possibility, Probability, Evidence
54(4)
3.4 Representational Correspondence
58(7)
4 Authors and Narrators
65(21)
4.1 A Distinction without a Difference?
65(4)
4.2 Implied and Second Authors
69(4)
4.3 A Concession
73(1)
4.4 A Note on Non-fiction
74(2)
4.5 Should there be a Presumption in Favour of the Internal Narrator?
76(10)
5 Expression and Imitation
86(23)
5.1 The Framing Effect of Point of View
87(6)
5.2 Conversation, Framing, and Joint Attention
93(4)
5.3 Joint Attending and Guided Attending
97(3)
5.4 Imitation
100(1)
5.5 Imitating the Unreal
101(5)
5.6 The Standard Model
106(3)
Appendix: Expression and the Reliability of Signalling
107(2)
6 Resistance
109(14)
6.1 Kinds of Resistance
109(5)
6.2 Abilities
114(1)
6.3 The Evolution of Resistance
115(2)
6.4 Confusing Framework and Content
117(4)
6.5 Conclusion
121(2)
7 Character-focused Narration
123(25)
7.1 Genette's Distinction
124(3)
7.2 The Knowledge Criterion
127(2)
7.3 Expression
129(7)
7.4 Focalization
136(3)
7.5 Context Shifting
139(5)
7.6 Empathy
144(2)
7.7 Conclusion
146(2)
8 Irony: A Pretended Point of View
148(19)
8.1 Ironic Situations
148(2)
8.2 Representational Irony
150(5)
8.3 Points of View
155(3)
8.4 Responding to Criticism
158(3)
8.5 Pretence of Manner
161(3)
8.6 Ironic Narration
164(3)
9 Dis-interpretation
167(19)
9.1 Irony in Pictures
168(1)
9.2 Point of View Shots
169(2)
9.3 Ironic Narration
171(4)
9.4 The Birds and the Psyche: Internal vs External Perspective
175(7)
9.5 Irony and Horror: The Tradition
182(2)
9.6 Science and the Supernatural
184(2)
10 Narrative and Character
186(13)
10.1 Preliminaries
187(1)
10.2 Some Claims about Character
188(2)
10.3 What Narrative does for Character
190(2)
10.4 What Character does for Narrative
192(3)
10.5 Character and the Critic
195(4)
11 Character Scepticism
199(20)
11.1 The Case against Character
199(5)
11.2 Response
204(4)
11.3 Simplifying the Problem
208(3)
11.4 The Role of Character in Narrative
211(2)
11.5 Reflections
213(6)
Appendix: Character and the Costs of Deception
216(3)
12 In Conclusion
219(2)
Bibliography 221(18)
Index 239
Gregory Currie is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Nottingham.

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