E-raamat: Prehistoric Rock Art: Polemics and Progress

  • Formaat: 238 pages, 90 b/w illus.
  • Ilmumisaeg: 21-Jun-2010
  • Kirjastus: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN-13: 9780511922138
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  • Formaat: 238 pages, 90 b/w illus.
  • Ilmumisaeg: 21-Jun-2010
  • Kirjastus: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN-13: 9780511922138

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"Prehistoric rock art is the markings - paintings, engravings, or pecked images - left on rocks or cave walls by ancient peoples. In this book, Paul G. Bahn provides a richly illustrated overview of prehistoric rock art and cave art from around the world. Summarizing the recent advances in our understanding of this extraordinary visual record, he discusses new discoveries, new approaches to recording and interpretation, and current problems in conservation. Bahn focuses in particular on current issues inthe interpretation of rock art, notably the "shamanic" interpretation that has been influential in recent years and that he refutes. This book is based on the Rhind Lectures that the author delivered for the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland in 2006"--

Provided by publisher.
Figures
ix
Foreword xiii
H. C. Woodhouse
Acknowledgements xv
Introduction 1(2)
1 Art on the rocks
3(29)
Stone horse and papal bull
3(3)
Saints and devils
6(1)
Some 17th- and 19th-century visitors
6(1)
Earliest photos and stampings
7(1)
The Picasso myth
8(2)
`Amateurs' and rock art
10(5)
Lhote and a pinch of salt
15(1)
Copies, snaps, and rubbings
16(8)
Continuing discoveries
24(8)
2 Myths and meanings
32(35)
Apparently straightforward depictions
32(4)
Making tracks
36(5)
Dominant animals
41(5)
Sex and violence
46(5)
Fantastic animals and therianthropes
51(5)
Myths and other meanings
56(6)
Leaps of faith
62(2)
Conclusion
64(3)
3 The emperor's new clothes I: sloppy tailoring
67(27)
A personal history
68(1)
The `three-stage' model and `entoptics'
69(5)
The `three-stage' model and `trance'
74(6)
The Eliade fraud
80(2)
`Shamans' and drugs
82(5)
The cave in the mind: Clottes and grottes
87(7)
4 The emperor's new clothes II: fashion disasters
94(43)
Central Asia: spot the shaman
95(2)
Southern Africa: snoring and bloody noses
97(8)
North Africa: do you believe in flying sorcerers?
105(2)
North America: the Coso Nostra
107(9)
Latin America: desperately seeking Eliade
116(2)
Europe: Ice Age follies
118(5)
Charge! Run away!
123(7)
Conclusion
130(5)
Coda: the `top ten of silliness'
135(2)
5 Location, location, location
137(23)
Tangible and intangible
137(1)
The architecture of the rock or wall
138(2)
The local landscape: wet and noisy
140(7)
Markers and monuments
147(3)
Visibility and views
150(2)
Accessibility: the public and the private
152(4)
The architecture of rocks, caves, and the landscape
156(3)
Conclusion
159(1)
6 The votive motive
160(10)
Earliest offerings
160(2)
Excavation and ethnography
162(6)
Conclusion
168(2)
7 Mustn't crumble
170(27)
Natural factors
170(3)
Human factors
173(7)
Recording disasters
180(4)
No publicity, please
184(3)
Conservation measures
187(3)
Death by bureaucracy
190(6)
Conclusion
196(1)
Conclusion 197(6)
Select bibliography 203(14)
Index 217
Paul G. Bahn is one of the world's leading scholars and popularizers of archaeology. The author or co-author of more than thirty books, he is the author of The Cambridge Illustrated History of Prehistoric Art. His articles have appeared in many newspapers and magazines, including Nature, and he is an editorial consultant to Archaeology Magazine, DIG, and Antiquity.