Second Language Acquisition [Pehme köide]

(University of Southampton)
  • Formaat: Paperback, 512 pages, kõrgus x laius x paksus: 246x183x27 mm, kaal: 866 g, illustrations
  • Sari: Oxford Core Linguistics
  • Ilmumisaeg: 31-Mar-2016
  • Kirjastus: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN-10: 0199687277
  • ISBN-13: 9780199687275
  • Formaat: Paperback, 512 pages, kõrgus x laius x paksus: 246x183x27 mm, kaal: 866 g, illustrations
  • Sari: Oxford Core Linguistics
  • Ilmumisaeg: 31-Mar-2016
  • Kirjastus: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN-10: 0199687277
  • ISBN-13: 9780199687275
This textbook approaches second language acquisition from the perspective of generative linguistics. Roumyana Slabakova reviews and discusses paradigms and findings from the last thirty years of research in the field, focussing in particular on how the second or additional language is represented in the mind and how it is used in communication. The adoption and analysis of a specific model of acquisition, the Bottleneck Hypothesis, provides a unifying perspective. The book assumes some non-technical knowledge of linguistics, but important concepts are clearly introduced and defined throughout, making it a valuable resource not only for undergraduate and graduate students of linguistics, but also for researchers in cognitive science and language teachers.

Arvustused

"This book is intended for a broad audience: undergraduate students who want to explore the field of SLA; graduate students who are involved with applied linguistics and language teaching; and teachers who want to understand better how L2 learners learn in different contexts..."--Linguist List

Preface xiii
List of abbreviations xvii
List of figures xix
Part I Language
1 Language architecture
3(21)
1.1 What is language? What is knowledge of language?
3(7)
1.2 The language architecture
10(6)
1.3 What exactly has to be acquired?
16(2)
1.4 The scientific method in SLA research
18(3)
1.5 Exercises
21(3)
2 Language variation
24(28)
2.1 How do languages differ?
24(5)
2.2 Principles and Parameters in history
29(9)
2.3 The Minimalist Program
38(6)
2.4 What is the learning task for bilinguals?
44(3)
2.5 Exercises
47(5)
3 The psychological reality of language in use
52(31)
3.1 What happens when we hear a sentence?
53(1)
3.2 Phonological perception and lexical recognition
53(4)
3.3 Morphology
57(3)
3.4 The syntactic parser
60(6)
3.5 Models of syntactic processing
66(6)
3.6 Working memory
72(3)
3.7 The psychological reality of language and the grammar
75(1)
3.8 Exercises
76(7)
Part II Language Acquisition
4 The Critical Period Hypothesis
83(27)
4.1 The view from biology
83(2)
4.2 The two positions in second language acquisition
85(1)
4.3 Global nativelikeness versus different sensitive periods for the separate parts of the grammar
86(4)
4.4 The first and the second language as communicating vessels
90(2)
4.5 Effects of bilingualism: Is the bilingual two monolinguals in one mind?
92(3)
4.6 The importance of the input
95(4)
4.7 An indirect way of appreciating the importance of input
99(3)
4.8 Conclusions
102(2)
4.9 Exercises
104(6)
5 First language acquisition, two first languages
110(31)
5.1 Acquisition of the sounds of one's native language
110(5)
5.2 Learning word meanings
115(4)
5.3 Acquisition of functional morphology and syntax
119(11)
5.4 Acquisition of semantics and pragmatics
130(2)
5.5 Bilingual first language acquisition
132(4)
5.6 Exercises
136(5)
6 Child second language, multilingual and heritage language acquisition, language attrition
141(34)
6.1 Adult L2 acquisition
142(1)
6.2 Child L2 acquisition
142(5)
6.3 L3/Ln acquisition
147(6)
6.4 Heritage language learners
153(5)
6.5 Language attrition
158(3)
6.6 Commonalities and differences between the four acquisition contexts
161(7)
6.6.1 Is age the crucial factor in bilingual acquisition?
161(1)
6.6.2 The Critical Period Hypothesis and the importance of the input
162(1)
6.6.3 What kind of input?
163(1)
6.6.4 Which areas of the grammar suffer with reduced input?
163(1)
6.6.5 Are first and second language acquisition qualitatively different?
164(4)
6.7 Exercises
168(7)
Part III Second Language Acquisition
7 Acquisition of (functional) morphology
175(33)
7.1 Morpheme studies
176(6)
7.2 Syntax-before-morphology, White (2003)
182(4)
7.3 Representational Deficit Hypotheses
186(3)
7.4 The Missing Surface Inflection Hypothesis
189(5)
7.5 The Prosodic Transfer Hypothesis
194(3)
7.6 The Feature Reassembly Hypothesis
197(6)
7.7 Exercises
203(5)
8 Acquisition of syntax
208(37)
8.1 A historical excursion into the notion of parameter (through the ages)
208(5)
8.2 Representational Deficit versus Full Functional Representation accounts
213(2)
8.3 Word order
215(6)
8.4 Verb movement
221(6)
8.5 Wh-movement
227(8)
8.6 Conclusion
235(1)
8.7 Exercises
236(9)
9 Acquisition of the mental lexicon
245(40)
9.1 Mental representation and access of lexical items
246(6)
9.1.1 Bilingual lexicon representation models
247(1)
9.1.2 The bilingual lexicon is integrated across languages
248(1)
9.1.3 The bilingual lexicon is accessed in a language-independent way
249(1)
9.1.4 Language exposure and use affects the activation of words in the lexicon
250(1)
9.1.5 Language context may not affect bilingual language activation
251(1)
9.2 Inhibition of one language to speak another
252(3)
9.3 Morphological decomposition in the lexicon
255(3)
9.4 Argument structure
258(9)
9.5 Transfer of reference
267(3)
9.6 Conclusion
270(1)
9.7 Exercises
270(15)
10 Acquisition of the syntax-semantics interface
285(34)
10.1 Types of meaning
285(5)
10.2 Mismatches at the syntax-semantics interface
290(2)
10.3 L2acquisition of syntax-semantics mismatches
292(7)
10.4 Poverty of the Stimulus learning situations in semantics
299(4)
10.5 Meaning of novel constructions
303(4)
10.6 Conjuring up something from nothing
307(4)
10.7 Conclusions
311(1)
10.8 Exercises
312(7)
11 Acquisition of the syntax-discourse and semantics- pragmatics interfaces
319(36)
11.1 Where is the syntax-discourse interface?
319(3)
11.2 Marking of Topic and Focus across second languages
322(8)
11.3 Word order: constraints and strategies
330(4)
11.4 Pronoun reference
334(4)
11.5 Intonation at the syntax-discourse interface
338(3)
11.6 Scalar implicatures
341(6)
11.7 Conclusion
347(1)
11.8 Exercises
347(8)
12 L2 processing
355(34)
12.1 Experimental techniques employed in bilingual processing studies
356(6)
12.2 Accounts and predictions
362(1)
12.3 L2 processing of functional morphology
363(5)
12.4 Parsing and syntactic processing in the L2
368(4)
12.5 Integration of meaning in syntactic processing
372(5)
12.6 Individual differences in grammar processing
377(7)
12.7 Conclusion
384(1)
12.8 Exercises
385(4)
13 The Bottleneck Hypothesis and its implications for the second language classroom
389(30)
13.1 The Bottleneck Hypothesis again
391(12)
13.1.1 What is special about the inflectional morphology?
391(4)
13.1.2 Lexical access and processing of functional morphology
395(4)
13.1.3 If the inflectional morphology is available, complex syntax is not a barrier to meaning
399(1)
13.1.4 If the inflectional morphology is available, semantics and pragmatics are not a problem
400(2)
13.1.5 Putting it all together
402(1)
13.2 Situating the Bottleneck Hypothesis in L2 learning and teaching
403(4)
13.3 Focus on form, interaction, practice, and input processing in the classroom
407(2)
13.4 How to, and how not to, focus on the functional morphology in the classroom
409(4)
13.5 Final words: what is difficult and what is easy to acquire in a second language
413(2)
13.6 Exercises
415(4)
Glossary 419(8)
References 427(48)
Index 475
Roumyana Slabakova is Professor and Chair of Applied Linguistics at the University of Southampton, UK, where she is Director of the Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR). Her research interests are in the second language acquisition of meaning, more specifically phrasal-semantic, discourse, and pragmatic meanings, as well as generative linguistics research applied to language teaching. Her publications include Telicity in the Second Language (Benjamins 2001) and Meaning in the Second Language (Mouton de Gruyter 2008). She is the founding co-editor of the journal Linguistic Approaches to Bilingualism and also co-edits the journal Second Language Research.

Tellige see raamat tutvumiseks TÜ Raamatupoodi!Raekoja plats 11, 51004 Tartu

Juhul, kui teie arvates võiks see raamat olla müügis ka Tartu Ülikooli Raamatupoes või soovite lihtsalt raamatuga enne ostu tutvuda, siis palun sisestaga allpool oma nimi ning e-mail. Võimaluse korral tellime raamatu poodi ning teavitame ka teid, kui raamat on müügile jõudnud.

* - väljad on kohustuslikud