Final Voyage of the Clipper Ship Teviotdale in 1876 [Pehme köide]

  • Formaat: Paperback / softback, kõrgus x laius: 234x156 mm
  • Ilmumisaeg: 21-Jun-2019
  • Kirjastus: Teviotdale60444
  • ISBN-10: 191606020X
  • ISBN-13: 9781916060203
Teised raamatud teemal:
  • Pehme köide
  • Hind: 14,80 EUR
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  • Tellimisaeg 2-4 nädalat
  • See raamat ei ole veel ilmunud. Raamatu kohalejõudmiseks kulub orienteeruvalt 2-4 nädalat peale raamatu väljaandmist.
  • Formaat: Paperback / softback, kõrgus x laius: 234x156 mm
  • Ilmumisaeg: 21-Jun-2019
  • Kirjastus: Teviotdale60444
  • ISBN-10: 191606020X
  • ISBN-13: 9781916060203
Teised raamatud teemal:
I first became aware of the hand-written manuscript recording my grandfather's memories of his epic voyage in the clipper ship Teviotdale in 1876 when I was a child during the years prior to World War 2. However, it was not until 2004 that I took a real interest in what has proved to be a remarkable true story. This was sparked off by an invitation from a crew member taking part in one of the first Round the World yacht races, which was due to start from Portsmouth later in the year. A crew member had noticed my company's web site advertising military combat identification and search and rescue beacons and, as a result, our UK sales agent and I were invited to visit Southampton Harbour to actually go on board one of these yachts to discuss their requirements. One requirement was for a flashing rescue beacon which could be attached to a life jacket in case of `man overboard' and the other was for a simple glow wand device for the crew to use when manning the yacht during pitch darkness without dazzling the helmsman during heavy seas. It was during this conversation that I began to think of what it would have been like for the crew of the Teviotdale, sailing under these self-same dangerous conditions in the southern Indian Ocean, also in pitch darkness. As a result, I became very friendly with the crew members of this particular yacht and I was very happy to supply a number of our devices for the crew to test for us during their voyage round the world. On the day they set sail from Gun Wharf Quay in Portsmouth I went to wish the crew of this yacht `bon voyage' and I gave them a copy of my grandfather's hand-written narrative to take on board to sail around the world with them, in memory of my grandfather. A Victorian Sea Adventure is the culmination of my research into the events surrounding the loss of the Teviotdale, and incorporates the full text of my grandfather's lecture on the clipper ship's fateful voyage. I hope it will be of interest to all those with an interest in the sea and conditions on board such ships from a bygone era.
When Stuart McEwen Jenkins was born in 1935 his family had moved to be near London so that his father could operate a haulage company, called Jenkins Express Removals, one of the first long-distance removals businesses to operate in the UK; his brother, James was in charge of the company's Scottish office in Glasgow. It was at the time of the 1930s Depression and there was great demand for people to move house from one end of the country to the other. Consequently, Stuart's family were comparatively well off, with the result that his father, a natural born engineer, could take up his interest in boats. In about 1938 he bought a life boat, which he called the Margaret, from a boat yard in Southampton. Stuart's father had it converted into a comfortable 6-berth motor cruiser fitted with a petrol engine he had converted for marine use in his home garage workshop. Stuart has a childhood memory of him testing this engine with it spewing out coolant water on to the garage forecourt. He sailed the Margaret along the Channel coast to Fambridge-on-Crouch in Essex and he remembers his family having a good time sailing up and down the Estuary on weekends. During the war years Stuart's father became a volunteer member of the Admiralty Small Boat Pool, which was vital in the success of the D-Day landings, from where he brought home a shell casing that had been fired during the Normandy landings. When he died in 1973 the base of this casing was incorporated into a memorial at the family grave site in Dysart Cemetery. During the periods that his father spent at home he began to teach Stuart the basics of engineering which has stood him in good stead for all his life. In 1949 he gained a place at the Northampton Polytechnic Secondary Technical School in London for a 3-year engineering course followed by a further 3 years at the National College of Horology (NCH) where he obtained an Honours Diploma. At the age of 19, Stuart became a graduate apprentice at Smiths Aircraft Instruments based in Cheltenham. During this time he studied for a National Certificate in Engineering with Endorsements and later became a Chartered Engineer (CEng). National Service then followed for 2 years during which he was based at the Proof and Experimental Establishment based on Foulness Island where he had a great opportunity to make use of my engineering skills. After National Service Stuart took a job with the Plessey company based in Havant, Hampshire, busy at the time making parts for radios and after a short time he moved on to their nearby Titchfield plant. In 1963, he took up a Senior Mechanical Engineer position with the GEC company based in Portsmouth and spent 6 years working on very interesting projects. In 1969, Stuart became a project manager at the newly-established De la Rue Instruments factory in Portsmouth to develop cash dispensing machines. He spent 16 years with this company and was fortunate to work, mainly, with the NCR and Diebold companies based in the USA, and some European companies. During this period he was responsible for the multi-denomination cash dispenser design which has been incorporated in `all' ATMs in use up to this day. In 1985, Stuart started his own business ventures, starting with the design of a dot matrix destination blind for buses and went on to form a company designing combat identification `CID' devices for military use. In all, Stuart has accumulated some 41 patents during his career.