Absolute Freebsd: The Complete Guide To FreeBSD, Third Edition [Pehme köide]

  • Formaat: Paperback / softback, 1 pages, kõrgus x laius: 235x178 mm, kaal: 368 g
  • Ilmumisaeg: 15-Sep-2018
  • Kirjastus: No Starch Press,US
  • ISBN-10: 1593278926
  • ISBN-13: 9781593278922
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  • Formaat: Paperback / softback, 1 pages, kõrgus x laius: 235x178 mm, kaal: 368 g
  • Ilmumisaeg: 15-Sep-2018
  • Kirjastus: No Starch Press,US
  • ISBN-10: 1593278926
  • ISBN-13: 9781593278922
Teised raamatud teemal:
This updated edition of Michael W. Lucas' definitive volume on FreeBSD-based systems adds coverage of modern disks, the ZFS filesystem IPv6, redesigned jail and packaging systems, and virtualization, among dozens of new features added in the last 10 years.

Absolute FreeBSD is your complete guide to FreeBSD, the powerful UNIX-like operating system that's supported modern servers, desktops, and platforms for years. In this completely revised third edition, FreeBSD committer Michael W. Lucas will teach you how to install, configure, and manage FreeBSD-based systems. You'll find added coverage of IPv6 and modern disks, redesigned jail and packaging systems, modern disks, and virtualization, and learn about two FreeBSD 11.x transformative features designed for cloud-based management, libxo and UCL.

Absolute FreeBSD will show you how to:
-Use advanced security features like packet filtering, virtual machines, and host-based intrusion detection
-Build custom live FreeBSD CDs and bootable flash-Manage network services and filesystems
-Use DNS and set up email, IMAP, web, and FTP services for both servers and clients
-Monitor your system with performance-testing and troubleshooting tools
-Run diskless systems
-Manage schedulers, remap shared libraries, and optimize your system for your hardware and your workload
-Build custom network appliances with embedded FreeBSD
-Implement redundant disks, even without special hardware
-Integrate FreeBSD-specific SNMP into your network management system.

If you've been using FreeBSD for years or are looking to add it your repertoire, Absolute FreeBSD will show you how your systems work and how to make them work better.
Foreword xxvii
Marshall Kirk McKusick
Acknowledgments xxxi
Introduction xxxiii
What Is FreeBSD? xxxiv
BSD: FreeBSD's Granddaddy
xxxiv
The BSD License
xxxv
The AT&T/CSRG/BSDi Iron Cage Match
xxxv
The Birth of FreeBSD
xxxvi
FreeBSD Development xxxvii
Committers
xxxvii
Contributors
xxxviii
Users
xxxix
Other BSDs xxxix
NetBSD
xxxix
OpenBSD
xxxix
DragonFly BSD
xxxix
macOS
xl
FreeBSD's Children
xl
Other Unixes xl
Solaris
xl
illumos
xli
AIX
xli
Linux
xli
Other Unixes
xli
FreeBSD's Strengths xlii
Portability
xlii
Power
xliii
Simplified Software Management
xliii
Customizable Builds
xliii
Advanced Filesystems
xliii
Who Should Use FreeBSD? xliii
Who Should Run Another BSD? xliv
Who Should Run a Proprietary Operating System? xliv
How to Read This Book xliv
What Must You Know? xlv
For the New System Administrator xlv
Desktop FreeBSD
xlvi
How to Think About Unix
xlvi
Notes on the Third Edition xlviii
1 Getting More Help 1(14)
Why Not Beg for Help?
2(1)
The FreeBSD Attitude
2(1)
Support Options
2(1)
Man Pages
3(4)
Manual Sections
4(1)
Navigating Man Pages
5(1)
Finding Man Pages
5(1)
Section Numbers and Man
6(1)
Man Page Contents
6(1)
FreeBSD.org
7(1)
Web Documents
7(1)
The Mailing List Archives
8(1)
The Forums
8(1)
Other Websites
8(1)
Using FreeBSD Problem-Solving Resources
9(2)
Checking the Handbook and FAQ
9(1)
Checking the Man Pages
9(2)
Mailing Lists Archives and Forums
11(1)
Using Your Answer
11(1)
Asking for Help
11(4)
Composing Your Message
12(2)
Responding to Email
14(1)
The Internet Is Forever
14(1)
2 Before You Install 15(14)
Default Files
16(1)
Configuration with UCL
17(1)
FreeBSD Hardware
17(3)
Proprietary Hardware
19(1)
Hardware Requirements
20(1)
BIOS versus EFI
20(1)
Disks and Filesystems
20(5)
FreeBSD Filesystems
21(1)
Filesystem Encryption
22(1)
Disk Partitioning Methods
23(1)
Partitioning with UFS
23(1)
Multiple Operating Systems
24(1)
Multiple Hard Drives
24(1)
Swap Space
24(1)
Getting FreeBSD
25(2)
FreeBSD Versions
26(1)
Choosing Installation Images
26(1)
Network Installs
27(2)
3 Installing 29(20)
Core Settings
30(2)
Distribution Selection
32(2)
Disk Partitioning
34(7)
UFS Installs
34(5)
ZFS Installs
39(2)
Network and Service Configuration
41(5)
Finishing the Install
46(3)
4 Start Me Up! The Boot Process 49(34)
Power-On
50(1)
Unified Extensible Firmware Interface
50(1)
Basic Input/Output System
50(1)
The Loader
51(1)
Boot Multi User [ Enter]
51(1)
Boot FreeBSD in Single-User Mode
51(1)
Escape to Loader Prompt
52(1)
Reboot
52(1)
Single-User Mode
52(3)
Disks in Single-User Mode
52(1)
Programs Available in Single-User Mode
53(1)
The Network in Single-User Mode
54(1)
Uses for Single-User Mode
54(1)
The Loader Prompt
55(2)
Viewing Disks
55(1)
Loader Variables
56(1)
Reboot
56(1)
Booting from the Loader
57(1)
Loader Configuration
57(1)
Boot Options
58(1)
Startup Messages
59(3)
Multiuser Startup
62(9)
/etc/rc.conf,/etc/rc.conf.d, and /etc/defaults/rc.conf
63(8)
The rc.d Startup System
71(3)
The service(8) Command
71(2)
System Shutdown
73(1)
Serial Consoles
74(9)
Serial Protocol
74(1)
Physical Serial Console Setup
75(1)
IPMI Serial Console Setup
76(1)
Configuring FreeBSD's Serial Console
77(2)
Using Serial Consoles
79(2)
Working at the Console
81(2)
5 Read This Before You Break Something Else! (Backup And Recovery) 83(12)
System Backups
84(1)
Backup Tapes
84(3)
Tape Drive Device Nodes, Rewinding, and Ejecting
84(1)
The $TAPE Variable
85(1)
Tape Status with mt(1)
86(1)
Other Tape Drive Commands
87(1)
BSD tar(1)
87(5)
tar Modes
88(2)
Other tar Features
90(1)
Compression
91(1)
Permissions Restore
91(1)
And More, More, More
92(1)
Recording What Happened
92(1)
Repairing a Broken System
92(3)
6 Kernel Games 95(28)
What Is the Kernel?
96(1)
Kernel State: sysctl
97(4)
sysctl MIBs
98(1)
sysctl Values and Definitions
99(1)
Viewing sysctls
100(1)
Changing sysctls
100(1)
Setting sysctls Automatically
101(1)
The Kernel Environment
101(2)
Viewing the Kernel Environment
101(1)
Dropping Hints to Device Drivers
102(1)
Kernel Modules
103(2)
Viewing Loaded Modules
103(1)
Loading and Unloading Modules
104(1)
Loading Modules at Boot
105(1)
Build Your Own Kernel
105(5)
Preparations
106(1)
Buses and Attachments
106(1)
Back Up Your Working Kernel
107(1)
Configuration File Format
107(2)
Configuration Files
109(1)
Building a Kernel
110(2)
Booting an Alternate Kernel
111(1)
Custom Kernel Configuration
112(7)
Trimming a Kernel
112(6)
Troubleshooting Kernel Builds
118(1)
Inclusions, Exclusions, and Expanding the Kernel
119(4)
Notes
119(1)
Inclusions and Exclusions
120(1)
Skipping Modules
121(2)
7 The Network 123(20)
Network Layers
124(3)
Physical Layer
124(1)
Datalink: The Physical Protocol
125(1)
The Network Layer
125(1)
Heavy Lifting: The Transport Layer
126(1)
Applications
126(1)
The Network in Practice
127(1)
Getting Bits and Hexes
128(2)
Network Stacks
130(1)
IPv4 Addresses and Netmasks
131(2)
Computing Netmasks in Decimal
132(1)
Unusable IP Addresses
133(1)
Assigning IPv4 Addresses
133(1)
IPv6 Addresses and Subnets
133(3)
IPv6 Basics
134(1)
Understanding IPv6 Addresses
134(1)
IPv6 Subnets
135(1)
Link-Local Addresses
135(1)
Assigning IPv6 Addresses
136(1)
TCP/IP Basics
136(4)
ICMP
136(1)
UDP
137(1)
TCP
137(1)
How Protocols Fit Together
138(1)
Transport Protocol Ports
138(2)
Understanding Ethernet
140(3)
Protocol and Hardware
140(1)
MAC Addresses
141(2)
8 Configuring Networking 143(24)
Network Prerequisites
144(6)
Configuring Changes with ifconfig(8)
144(1)
Adding an IP to an Interface
145(1)
Testing Your Interface
146(1)
Set Default Route
146(1)
Multiple IP Addresses on One Interface
147(1)
Renaming Interfaces
148(1)
DHCP
149(1)
Reboot!
149(1)
The Domain Name Service
150(4)
Host/IP Information Sources
151(1)
Local Names with /etc/hosts
151(1)
Configuring Nameservice
152(1)
Caching Nameserver
153(1)
Network Activity
154(4)
Current Network Activity
154(1)
What's Listening on Which Port?
155(1)
Port Listeners in Detail
156(1)
Network Capacity in the Kernel
157(1)
Optimizing Network Performance
158(4)
Optimizing Network Hardware
159(1)
Memory Usage
159(2)
Maximum Incoming Connections
161(1)
Polling
161(1)
Other Optimizations
162(1)
Network Adapter Teaming
162(2)
Aggregation Protocols
163(1)
Configuring lagg(4)
164(1)
Virtual LANs
164(3)
Configuring VLAN Devices
164(1)
Configuring VLANs at Boot
165(2)
9 Securing Your System 167(34)
Who Is the Enemy?
168(2)
Script Kiddies
168(1)
Disaffected Users
169(1)
Botnets
169(1)
Motivated Skilled Attackers
169(1)
FreeBSD Security Announcements
170(1)
User Security
171(7)
Creating User Accounts
171(1)
Configuring Adduser: /etc/adduser.conf
172(1)
Editing Users
173(5)
Shells and/etc/shells
178(1)
root, Groups, and Management
179(6)
The root Password
179(1)
Groups of Users
180(2)
Using Groups to Avoid Root
182(3)
Tweaking User Security
185(7)
Restricting Login Ability
185(3)
Restricting System Usage
188(4)
File Flags
192(3)
Setting and Viewing File Flags
194(1)
Securelevels
195(3)
Securelevel Definitions
195(2)
Which Securelevel Do You Need?
197(1)
What Won't Securelevels and File Flags Accomplish2
197(1)
Living with Securelevels
198(1)
Network Targets
198(1)
Putting It All Together
199(2)
10 Disks, Partitioning, And GEOM 201(30)
Disks Lie
201(1)
Device Nodes
202(1)
The Common Access Method
203(1)
What Disks Do You Have?
204(1)
Non-CAM Devices
204(1)
The GEOM Storage Architecture
204(4)
GEOM Autoconfiguration
205(1)
GEOM vs. Volume Managers
206(1)
Providers, Consumers, and Slicers
206(1)
GEOM Control Programs
207(1)
GEOM Device Nodes and Stacks
208(1)
Hard Disks, Partitions, and Schemes
208(1)
The Filesystem Table: /etc/fstab
209(1)
What's Mounted Now?
210(1)
Disk labeling
211(3)
Viewing Labels
212(1)
Sample Labels
212(2)
GEOM Withering
214(1)
The gpart(8) Command
214(3)
Viewing Partitions
215(1)
Other Views
216(1)
Removing Partitions
216(1)
Scheming Disks
217(1)
Removing the Disk Partitioning Scheme
217(1)
Assigning the Partitioning Scheme
217(1)
The GPT Partitioning Scheme
218(5)
GPT Device Nodes
218(1)
GPT Partition Types
219(1)
Creating GPT Partitions
219(2)
Resizing GPT Partitions
221(1)
Changing Labels and Types
221(1)
Booting on Legacy Hardware
222(1)
Unified Extensible Firmware Interface and GPT
222(1)
Expanding GPT Disks
223(1)
The MBR Partitioning Scheme
223(4)
What Is the Master Boot Record?
223(1)
BSD Labels
224(1)
MBR Device Nodes
224(1)
MBR and Disklabel Alignment
225(1)
Creating Slices
225(1)
Removing Slices
226(1)
Activating Slices
226(1)
BSD Labels
227(4)
Creating a BSD Label
227(1)
Creating BSD Label Partitions
227(1)
Assigning Specific Partition Letters
228(3)
11 The Unix File System 231(26)
UFS Components
232(1)
The Fast File System
232(1)
How UFS Uses FFS
232(1)
Vnodes
233(1)
Mounting and Unmounting Filesystems
233(4)
Mounting Standard Filesystems
233(1)
Special Mounts
234(1)
Unmounting a Partition
234(1)
UFS Mount Options
234(3)
UFS Resiliency
237(2)
Soft Updates
237(1)
Soft Updates Journaling
238(1)
GEOM Journaling
238(1)
Creating and Tuning UFS Filesystems
239(4)
UFS Labeling
239(1)
Block and Fragment Size
239(1)
Using GEOM Journaling
240(1)
Tuning UFS
241(2)
Expanding UFS Filesystems
243(1)
UFS Snapshots
243(2)
Taking and Destroying Snapshots
244(1)
Finding Snapshots
244(1)
Snapshot Disk Usage
244(1)
UFS Recovery and Repair
245(4)
System Shutdown: The Syncer
245(1)
Dirty Filesystems
245(1)
File System Checking: fsck(8)
246(2)
Forcing Read-Write Mounts on Dirty Disks
248(1)
Background fsck, fsck-y, Foreground fsck, Oy Vey!
248(1)
UFS Space Reservations
249(1)
How Full Is a Partition?
250(2)
Adding New UFS storage
252(5)
Partitioning the Disk
252(1)
Configuring /etc/fstab
253(1)
Installing Existing Files onto New Disks
253(1)
Stackable Mounts
254(3)
12 The Z File System 257(24)
Datasets
258(5)
Dataset Properties
260(1)
Managing Datasets
261(2)
ZFS Pools
263(2)
Pool Details
264(1)
Pool Properties
264(1)
Viewing Pool Properties
264(1)
Virtual Devices
265(2)
VDEV Types and Redundancy
265(2)
Managing Pools
267(3)
ZFS and Disk Block Size
267(1)
Creating and Viewing Pools
268(1)
Multi-VDEV Pools
269(1)
Destroying Pools
270(1)
Errors and -f
270(1)
Copy-On-Write
270(1)
Snapshots
271(2)
Creating Snapshots
271(1)
Accessing Snapshots
272(1)
Destroying Snapshots
273(1)
Compression
273(1)
Pool Integrity and Repair
273(3)
Integrity Verification
274(1)
Repairing Pools
274(1)
Pool Status
274(2)
Boot Environments
276(5)
Viewing Boot Environments
277(1)
Creating and Accessing Boot Environments
277(1)
Activating Boot Environments
278(1)
Removing Boot Environments
279(1)
Boot Environments at Boot
279(1)
Boot Environments and Applications
279(2)
13 Foreign Filesystems 281(36)
FreeBSD Mount Commands
282(2)
Supported Foreign Filesystems
282(1)
Permissions and Foreign Filesystems
283(1)
Using Removable Media
284(4)
Ejecting Removable Media
285(1)
Removable Media and /etc/fstab
285(1)
Formatting FAT32 Media
286(1)
Creating Optical Media
286(2)
Writing Images to Thumb Drives
288(1)
Memory Filesystems
288(7)
tmpfs
289(1)
Memory Disks
290(2)
Mounting Disk Images
292(1)
Filesystems in Files
293(2)
devfs
295(5)
/dev at Boot
295(2)
Global devfs Rules
297(2)
Dynamic Device Management with devd(8)
299(1)
Miscellaneous Filesystems
300(1)
The Network File System
301(9)
NFS Versions
302(1)
Configuring the NFS Server
302(2)
Configuring NFS Exports
304(4)
Enabling the NFS Client
308(2)
The Common Internet File System
310(5)
Prerequisites
310(1)
Kernel Support
311(1)
Configuring CIFS
311(1)
nsmb.conf Keywords
311(2)
CIFS Name Resolution
313(1)
Other smbutil(1) Functions
313(1)
Mounting a Share
313(1)
Other mount_smbfs Options
314(1)
nsmb.conf Options
314(1)
CIFS File Ownership
315(1)
Serving CIFS Shares
315(2)
14 Exploring/Etc 317(18)
/etc Across Unix Species
318(1)
/etc/adduser.conf
318(1)
/etc/aliases
318(1)
/etc/amd.map
318(1)
/etc/auto_master
318(1)
/etc/blacklistd.conf
319(1)
/etc/bluetooth, /etc/bluetooth.device.conf, and /etc/defaults/bluetooth.device.conf
319(1)
/etc/casper
319(1)
/etc/crontab and /etc/cron.d
319(1)
/etc/csh.*
319(1)
/etc/ddb.conf
319(1)
/etc/devd.conf
320(1)
/etc/devfs.conf, /etc/devfs.rules, and /etc/defaults/devfs.rules
320(1)
/etc/dhclient.conf
320(1)
/etc/disktab
320(1)
/etc/dma/
/321
/etc/freebsd-update.conf
321(1)
/etc/fstab
321(1)
/etc/ftp.*
321(1)
/etc/group
321(1)
/etc/hostid
321(1)
/etc/hosts
321(1)
/etc/hosts.allow
321(1)
/etc/hosts.equiv
321(1)
/etc/hosts.Ipd
322(1)
/etc/inetd.conf
322(1)
/etc/libmap.conf
322(1)
/etc/localtime
322(1)
/etc/locate.rc
323(1)
/etc/login.*
323(1)
/etc/mail
324(1)
/etc/mail.rc
324(1)
/etc/mail/mailer.conf
324(1)
/etc/make.conf
324(1)
CFLAGS
324(1)
COPTFLAGS
325(1)
CXXFLAGS
325(1)
/etc/master.passwd
325(1)
/etc/motd
325(1)
/etc/mtree
325(1)
/etc/netconfig
325(1)
/etc/netstart
326(1)
/etc/network.subr
326(1)
/etc/newsyslog.conf
326(1)
/etc/nscd.conf
326(1)
/etc/nsmb.conf
326(1)
/etc/nsswitch.conf
326(1)
/etc/ntp/, /etc/ntp.conf
326(1)
/etc/opie*
326(1)
/etc/pam.d/*
327(1)
/etc/passwd
327(1)
/etc/pccard_ether
327(1)
/etc/periodic.conf and /etc/defaults/periodic.conf
327(1)
daily_output="root"
327(1)
daily_show_success="YES"
328(1)
daily_show_info="YES"
328(1)
daily_show_badconfig="NO"
328(1)
daily_local="/etc/daily.local"
328(1)
/etc/pf.conf, /etc/pf.os
328(1)
/etc/phones
328(1)
/etc/portsnap.conf
329(1)
/etc/ppp/
/329
/etc/printcap
329(1)
/etc/profile
329(1)
/etc/protocols
329(1)
/etc/pwd.db
329(1)
/etc/rc*
329(1)
/et/regdomain.xml
330(1)
/etc/remote
330(1)
/etc/resolv.conf
330(1)
/etc/rpc
330(1)
/etc/security/
/330
/etc/services
331(1)
/etc/shells
331(1)
/etc/skel/
/331
/etc/snmpd.config
331(1)
/etc/spwd.db
331(1)
/etc/src.conf
331(1)
/etc/ssh/
/331
/etc/ssl/
/331
/etc/sysctl.conf
332(1)
/etc/syslog.conf, /etc/syslog.conf.d/
/332
/etc/termcap, /etc/termcap.small
332(1)
/etc/ttys
332(1)
/etc/unbound/
/332
/etc/wall_cmos_clock
332(3)
/etc/zfs/
/333
15 Making Your System Useful 335(26)
Ports and Packages
336(1)
Packages
336(20)
Package Files
337(1)
Introducing pkg(8)
337(1)
Installing pkg(8)
338(1)
Common pkg Options
339(1)
Configuring pkg(8)
339(1)
Finding Packages
340(2)
Installing Software
342(3)
The Package Cache
345(1)
Package Information and Automatic Installs
346(4)
Uninstalling Packages
350(1)
Changing the Package Database
351(1)
Locking Packages
352(1)
Package Files
353(1)
Package Integrity
354(1)
Package Maintenance
355(1)
Package Networking and Environment
355(1)
Package Repositories
356(2)
Repository Configuration
356(1)
Repository Customization
357(1)
Repository Inheritance
357(1)
Package Branches
358(1)
Upgrading Packages
359(2)
16 Customizing Software With Ports 361(34)
Making Software
362(1)
Source Code and Software
362(1)
The Ports Collection
363(4)
Ports
364(3)
The Ports Index
367(3)
Searching the Index
368(1)
Legal Restrictions
369(1)
What's In a Port?
370(11)
Installing a Port
371(2)
Port Customization Options
373(6)
Building Packages
379(1)
Uninstalling and Reinstalling Ports
379(1)
Tracking Port Build Status
379(1)
Cleaning Up Ports
380(1)
Read-Only Ports Tree
380(1)
Changing the Install Path
380(1)
Private Package Repositories
381(10)
Poudriere Resources
382(1)
Installing and Configuring Poudriere
383(1)
Poudriere Jail Creation
383(3)
Install a Poudriere Ports Tree
386(1)
Configuring Poudriere Ports
386(2)
Running Poudriere
388(1)
Using the Private Repository
389(2)
All Poudrieres, Large and Small
391(1)
Small Systems
391(1)
Large Systems
391(1)
Updating Poudriere
392(1)
More Poudriere
393(2)
17 Advanced Software Management 395(26)
Using Multiple Processors: SMP
396(5)
Kernel Assumptions
396(1)
SMP: The First Try
397(1)
Today's SMP
398(1)
Processors and SMP
399(2)
Threads, Threads, and More Threads
401(1)
Startup and Shutdown Scripts
402(3)
rc Script Ordering
402(1)
A Typical rc Script
403(1)
Special rc Script Providers
404(1)
Vendor Startup/Shutdown Scripts
405(1)
Debugging Custom rc Scripts
405(1)
Managing Shared Libraries
405(5)
Shared Library Versions and Files
406(1)
Attaching Shared Libraries to Programs
406(3)
LD_LIBRARY_PATH and LD_PRELOAD
409(1)
What a Program Wants
410(1)
Remapping Shared Libraries
410(2)
Running Software from the Wrong OS
412(6)
Recompilation
412(1)
Emulation
413(1)
ABI Reimplementation
413(1)
Binary Branding
414(1)
Supported ABIs
414(1)
Installing and Configuring the Linuxulator
415(3)
Using Linux Mode
418(2)
Debugging Linux Mode
418(2)
Running Software from the Wrong Architecture or Release
420(1)
18 Upgrading FreeBSD 421(30)
FreeBSD Versions
422(6)
Releases
422(1)
FreeBSD-current
422(1)
FreeBSD-stable
423(2)
Snapshots
425(1)
FreeBSD Support Model
426(1)
Testing FreeBSD
426(1)
Which Version Should You Use?
427(1)
Upgrade Methods
428(1)
Binary Updates
428(7)
/etc/freebsd-update.conf
429(1)
Running freebsd-update(8)
430(4)
Reverting Updates
434(1)
Scheduling Binary Updates
434(1)
Optimizing and Customizing FreeBSD Update
434(1)
Upgrading via Source
435(2)
Which Source Code?
435(2)
Updating Source Code
437(1)
Building FreeBSD from Source
437(11)
Build the World
438(1)
Build, Install, and Test a Kernel
439(1)
Prepare to Install the New World
440(3)
Installing the World
443(3)
Customizing Mergemaster
446(2)
Upgrades and Single-User Mode
448(1)
Shrinking FreeBSD
448(1)
Packages and System Upgrades
449(1)
Updating Installed Ports
450(1)
19 Advanced Security Features 451(40)
Unprivileged Users
452(2)
The nobody Account
453(1)
A Sample Unprivileged User
453(1)
Network Traffic Control
454(1)
Default Accept vs. Default Deny
454(1)
TCP Wrappers
455(7)
Configuring Wrappers
456(6)
Wrapping Up Wrappers
462(1)
Packet Filtering
462(8)
Enabling PF
463(1)
Default Accept and Default Deny in Packet Filtering
463(1)
Basic Packet Filtering and Stateful Inspection
464(1)
Configuring PF
465(2)
Small-Server PF Rule Sample
467(2)
Managing PF
469(1)
Blacklistd(8)
470(5)
PF and Blacklistd
471(1)
Configuring Blacklistd
471(2)
Configuring Blacklistd Clients
473(1)
Managing Blacklistd
474(1)
De-Blacklisting
474(1)
Public-Key Encryption
475(7)
OpenSSL
477(1)
Certificates
478(3)
TLS Trick: Connecting to TLS-Protected Ports
481(1)
Global Security Settings
482(3)
Install-Time Options
483(1)
Secure Console
484(1)
Nonexecutable Stack and Stack Guard
484(1)
Other Security Settings
485(1)
Preparing for Intrusions with mtree(1)
485(4)
Running mtree(1)
486(1)
mtree(1) Output: The Spec File
487(1)
The Exclusion File
488(1)
Saving the Spec File
488(1)
Finding System Differences
488(1)
Monitoring System Security
489(1)
Package Security
490(1)
If You're Hacked
490(1)
20 Small System Services 491(34)
Secure Shell
491(8)
The SSH Server: sshd(8)
492(1)
SSH Keys and Fingerprints
493(1)
Configuring the SSH Daemon
494(2)
Managing SSH User Access
496(1)
SSH Clients
497(2)
Email
499(5)
mailwrapper(8)
499(1)
The Dragonfly Mail Agent
500(3)
The Aliases File and DMA
503(1)
Network Time
504(3)
Setting the Time Zone
504(1)
Network Time Protocol
505(2)
Name Service Switching
507(1)
inetd
508(4)
/etc/inetd.conf
509(1)
Configuring inetd Servers
510(1)
Starting inetd(8)
511(1)
Changing inetd's Behavior
512(1)
DHCP
512(4)
How DHCP Works
513(1)
Configuring dhcpd(8)
514(2)
Managing dhcpd(8)
516(1)
Printing and Print Servers
516(2)
/etc/printcap
517(1)
Enabling LPD
518(1)
TFTP
518(2)
Root Directory
518(1)
tftpd and Files
519(1)
File Ownership
519(1)
tftpd(8) Configuration
519(1)
Scheduling Tasks
520(5)
cron(8)
520(3)
periodic(8)
523(2)
21 System Performance And Monitoring 525(38)
Computer Resources
526(1)
Checking the Network
527(1)
General Bottleneck Analysis with vmstat(8)
528(4)
Processes
529(1)
Memory
529(1)
Paging
530(1)
Disks
530(1)
Faults
531(1)
CPU
531(1)
Using vmstat
531(1)
Continuous vmstat
531(1)
Disk I/O
532(1)
CPU, Memory, and I/O with top(1)
533(6)
UFS and top(1)
533(3)
ZFS and top(1)
536(1)
Process List
537(1)
top(1) and I/O
538(1)
Following Processes
539(1)
Paging and Swapping
540(1)
Paging
541(1)
Swapping
541(1)
Performance Tuning
541(4)
Memory Usage
542(1)
Swap Space Usage
542(1)
CPU Usage
543(1)
Rescheduling
543(1)
Reprioritizing with Niceness
543(2)
Status Mail
545(1)
Logging with syslogd
546(7)
Facilities
546(1)
Levels
547(1)
Processing Messages with syslogd(8)
548(4)
syslogd Customization
552(1)
Log File Management
553(4)
Log File Path
553(1)
Owner and Group
553(1)
Permissions
554(1)
Count
554(1)
Size
554(1)
Time
554(2)
Flags
556(1)
Pidfile
556(1)
Signal
557(1)
Sample newsyslog.conf Entry
557(1)
FreeBSD and SNMP
557(6)
SNMP 101
557(3)
Configuring bsnmpd
560(3)
22 Jails 563(20)
Jail Basics
564(1)
Jail Host Server Setup
565(3)
Jail Host Storage
565(1)
Jail Networking
565(3)
Jails at Boot
568(1)
Jail Setup
568(7)
Jail Userland
569(1)
/etc/jail.conf
569(4)
Testing and Configuring a Jail
573(1)
Jail Startup and Shutdown
574(1)
Jail Dependencies
575(1)
Managing Jails
575(4)
Viewing Jails and Jail IDs
575(1)
Jailed Processes
575(1)
Running Commands in Jails
576(2)
Installing Jail Packages
578(1)
Updating Jails
578(1)
More Jail Options
579(1)
Jailing Ancient FreeBSD
580(1)
Last Jail Notes
581(2)
23 The Fringe Of FreeBSD 583(16)
Terminals
584(2)
/etc/ttys Format
584(1)
Insecure Console
585(1)
Managing Cloudy FreeBSD
586(1)
LibXo
586(1)
Universal Configuration Language
587(1)
Diskless FreeBSD
587(5)
Diskless Clients
588(1)
DHCP Server Setup
588(2)
tftpd and the Boot Loader
590(1)
Diskless Security
591(1)
The NFS Server and the Diskless Client Userland
591(1)
Diskless Farm Configuration
592(2)
Configuration Hierarchy
593(1)
Diskless Remounting /etc
593(1)
Finalizing Setup
594(1)
Installing Packages
594(1)
SSH Keys
595(1)
Storage Encryption
595(4)
Generating and Using a Cryptographic Key
597(1)
Filesystems on Encrypted Devices
597(2)
24 Problem Reports And Panics 599(14)
Bug Reports
600(6)
Before Filing a Bug
601(1)
Bad Bug Reports
602(1)
The Fix
603(1)
Filing Bugs
603(2)
After Submitting
605(1)
System Panics
606(1)
Recognizing Panics
606(1)
Responding to a Panic
607(6)
Preparations
608(1)
The Crash Dump in Action
608(1)
Testing Crash Dumps
609(1)
Crash Dump Types
610(1)
Textdumps
610(1)
Dumps and Security
611(2)
Afterword 613(6)
The FreeBSD Community
613(2)
Why Do We Do It?
615(1)
What Can You Do?
615(1)
If Nothing Else
616(1)
Getting Things Done
617(2)
Bibliography 619(2)
References
619(1)
Books I've Written
620(1)
Index 621