Academic Writing: A Handbook for International Students 5th New edition [Pehme köide]

(Freelance writer of materials for English for Academic Purposes)
  • Formaat: Paperback / softback, 314 pages, kõrgus x laius: 248x191 mm, kaal: 740 g, 18 Line drawings, black and white; 123 Tables, black and white; 18 Illustrations, black and white
  • Ilmumisaeg: 01-Dec-2017
  • Kirjastus: Routledge
  • ISBN-10: 1138048747
  • ISBN-13: 9781138048744
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  • Formaat: Paperback / softback, 314 pages, kõrgus x laius: 248x191 mm, kaal: 740 g, 18 Line drawings, black and white; 123 Tables, black and white; 18 Illustrations, black and white
  • Ilmumisaeg: 01-Dec-2017
  • Kirjastus: Routledge
  • ISBN-10: 1138048747
  • ISBN-13: 9781138048744
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Now in its fifth edition, Academic Writing helps international students succeed in writing essays and reports for their English-language academic courses. Thoroughly revised and updated, it is designed to let teachers and students easily find the topics they need, both in the classroom and for self-study.

The book consists of five parts:

  • The Writing Process
  • Elements of Writing
  • Language Issues
  • Vocabulary for Writing
  • Writing Models

The first part explains and practises every stage of essay writing, from choosing the best sources, reading and note-making, through to referencing and proofreading. The four remaining parts, organised alphabetically, can be taught in conjunction with the first part or used on a remedial basis. A progress check at the end of each part allows students to assess their learning. All units are fully cross-referenced, and a complete set of answers to the practice exercises is included.

New topics in this edition include Writing in Groups, Written British and American English, and Writing Letters and Emails. In addition, the new interactive website has a full set of teaching notes as well as more challenging exercises, revision material and links to other sources. Additional features of the book include:

  • Models provided for writing tasks such as case studies and essays
  • Use of authentic academic texts from a wide range of disciplines
  • Designed for self-study as well as classroom use
  • Useful at both undergraduate and postgraduate level
  • Glossary to explain technical terms, plus index

Written to deal with the specific language issues faced by international students, this practical, user-friendly book is an invaluable guide to academic writing in English.

Arvustused

Academic Writing is organized in a way that makes sense for teaching writing skills. The content covers a diverse body of samples from various fields, so it works wonderfully for my undergrad or graduate students. I especially like the section on common language errors, which includes extra practice for students; there is a good balance between writing instruction and discrete skill practice. It isn't easy to find a text that addresses plagiarism in a way that is clear for students to understand, and this text does the job! Ixchell Reyes, University of Southern California, USA This book is an excellent example of inclusive teaching. It is aimed primarily at international students, but reaches further, as it is equally useful for British students and students who come from a more practice-focused background. It is also a strong companion to books on research methods that need a solid basis for academic skills. The clear structure, accessible content, and well thought through activities in this book, all give students the confidence to write effective academic work without the fear of breaking rules of plagiarism or academic malpractice. This is the book I recommend to all my students at the beginning of each academic year, independent of the subject I teach and the composition of my cohort. Maria Lonsdale, University of Leeds, UK Academic Writing is simply organised, allowing ease of access for beginner writers and specifically introducing them to the language needed to enter the conversations on academic writing. Djuddah Leijen, University of Tartu, Estonia The 5th edition of Academic Writing includes many new features which are extremely useful for all university students who are inexperienced in writing for academic purposes. The book provides both information on important aspects of academic writing and practice exercises which all students will find invaluable. It is a useful book for anyone who is new to writing for academic purposes, regardless of her level of proficiency in English. Radhika Jaidev, Singapore Institute of Technology, Singapore An excellent book that, although aimed at international students, would also benefit UK students who come from a more practise-focused background. Study skills tutors can use it to strengthen particular issues or areas of study that students might be struggling with. Jan Beechey, Dyslexia Review

Acknowledgements xix
Introduction for Teachers xx
Introduction for Students xxii
Academic Writing Quiz xxv
Written British and American English -- A Short Guide xxviii
Part 1 The Writing Process
1(88)
1.1 Basics of Writing
3(7)
The purpose of academic writing
3(1)
Features of academic writing
3(1)
Common types of academic writing
4(1)
The format of short and long writing tasks
4(2)
The components of academic writing
6(1)
Some other common text components
7(1)
Simple and longer sentences
7(1)
Writing in paragraphs
8(1)
Practice
9(1)
1.2 Reading: Finding Suitable Sources
10(7)
Academic texts
10(3)
Types of text
13(1)
Using reading lists
13(1)
Using library catalogues
14(1)
Using library websites to search electronic resources
15(2)
1.3 Reading: Developing Critical Approaches
17(9)
Reading methods
17(1)
Titles, subtitles and text features
18(1)
Reading abstracts
19(1)
Fact and opinion
20(1)
Assessing internet sources critically
21(1)
Practice
22(1)
Critical thinking
23(3)
1.4 Avoiding Plagiarism
26(7)
What is plagiarism?
26(1)
Acknowledging sources
27(1)
Degrees of plagiarism
27(1)
Avoiding plagiarism by summarising and paraphrasing
28(2)
Avoiding plagiarism by developing good study habits
30(1)
Practice
30(1)
Further practice
31(1)
Research
32(1)
1.5 From Understanding Essay Titles to Planning
33(6)
The planning process
33(1)
Analysing essay titles
34(1)
Practice
34(1)
Brainstorming
35(1)
Essay length
36(1)
Writing outlines
37(1)
Practice
38(1)
1.6 Finding Key Points and Note-making
39(7)
Finding key points
39(1)
Finding relevant points
40(1)
Practice A
41(1)
Why make notes?
41(1)
Note-making methods
42(2)
Effective note-making
44(1)
Practice B
44(2)
1.7 Summarising and Paraphrasing
46(9)
What makes a good summary?
46(1)
Stages of summarising
47(1)
Practice A
47(1)
Practice B
48(2)
Practice C
50(1)
Paraphrasing
51(1)
Practice D
51(1)
Techniques for paraphrasing
52(1)
Practice E
52(2)
Practice F
54(1)
1.8 References and Quotations
55(9)
Why use references?
55(1)
Citations and references
56(1)
Reference verbs
56(1)
Reference systems
57(1)
Using quotations
57(2)
Practice
59(1)
Abbreviations in citations
60(1)
Secondary references
61(1)
Organising the list of references
61(3)
1.9 Combining Sources
64(7)
Referring to sources
64(1)
Taking a critical approach
65(3)
Combining three sources
68(1)
Practice
68(3)
1.10 Organising Paragraphs
71(5)
Paragraph structure
71(1)
Practice A
72(1)
Practice B
73(1)
Introducing paragraphs and linking them together
74(1)
Practice C
74(1)
Practice D
74(2)
1.11 Introductions and Conclusions
76(6)
Introduction components
76(1)
Introduction structure
77(2)
Opening sentences
79(1)
Conclusions
80(1)
Conclusion structure
81(1)
Practice
81(1)
1.12 Rewriting and Proofreading
82(7)
Rewriting
82(1)
Practice A
82(2)
Practice B
84(1)
Proofreading
84(1)
Practice C
84(1)
Practice D
85(1)
Practice E
85(1)
Progress check 1
86(3)
Part 2 Elements of Writing
89(44)
2.1 Argument and Discussion
91(5)
Discussion vocabulary
91(1)
Organisation
92(1)
Practice A
93(1)
The language of discussion
93(1)
Counter-arguments
93(1)
Providing evidence
94(1)
Practice B
95(1)
2.2 Cause and Effect
96(5)
The language of cause and effect
96(1)
Practice A
97(1)
Practice B
98(1)
Practice C
99(1)
Practice D
99(2)
2.3 Comparison
101(5)
Comparison structures
101(1)
Practice A
102(1)
Forms of comparison
103(1)
Using superlatives
103(1)
Practice B
103(1)
Practice C
104(1)
Practice D
105(1)
2.4 Definitions
106(4)
Simple definitions
106(1)
Category words
106(2)
Complex definitions
108(1)
Practice
109(1)
2.5 Examples
110(4)
Using examples
110(1)
Phrases to introduce examples
111(1)
Practice A
111(1)
Practice B
112(1)
Restatement
113(1)
2.6 Generalisations
114(4)
Using generalisations
114(1)
Structure
115(1)
Practice A
115(1)
Practice B
116(1)
Building on generalisations
116(1)
Practice C
117(1)
2.7 Problems and Solutions
118(4)
Paragraph structure
118(1)
Alternative structure
119(1)
Vocabulary
119(1)
Practice A
120(1)
Practice B
120(1)
Practice C
120(2)
2.8 Visual Information
122(11)
Types of visuals
122(3)
The language of change
125(1)
Describing visuals
126(2)
Labelling
128(1)
Practice A
128(1)
Practice B
129(1)
Progress check 2
130(3)
Part 3 Language Issues
133(44)
3.1 Cohesion
135(4)
Reference words
135(1)
Practice A
136(1)
Preventing confusion
136(1)
Practice B
137(1)
Implied language
137(1)
Practice C
138(1)
Practice D
138(1)
3.2 Definite Articles
139(4)
Use of articles
139(1)
Using definite articles
140(1)
Practice A
141(1)
Practice B
142(1)
3.3 Numbers
143(5)
The language of numbers
143(1)
Percentages
144(1)
Simplification
144(1)
Further numerical phrases
145(2)
Practice
147(1)
3.4 Passive and Active
148(4)
Active and passive
148(1)
Structure
149(1)
Use of the passive
149(1)
Adverbs with passives
150(1)
Practice
151(1)
3.5 Punctuation
152(5)
Capital letters
152(1)
Full stops
153(1)
Commas
153(1)
Apostrophes
154(1)
Semicolons
154(1)
Colons
154(1)
Quotations marks/inverted commas
155(1)
Others
155(1)
Practice A
156(1)
Practice B
156(1)
3.6 Singular or Plural?
157(4)
Five difficult areas
157(1)
Group phrases
158(1)
Uncountable nouns
158(2)
Practice A
160(1)
Practice B
160(1)
3.7 Style
161(8)
Developing an academic style
161(1)
Guidelines
162(1)
Practice A
163(1)
Avoiding repetition and redundancy
164(1)
Varying sentence length
165(1)
The use of caution
166(1)
Using modifiers
167(1)
Practice B
168(1)
3.8 Time Markers
169(8)
How time markers are used
169(1)
Practice A
170(1)
Tenses
170(1)
Practice B
170(1)
Practice C
171(2)
Progress check 3
173(4)
Part 4 Vocabulary for Writing
177(46)
4.1 Approaches to Vocabulary
179(6)
Vocabulary issues
179(1)
Dealing with new vocabulary
180(1)
Language features
181(1)
Practice
181(1)
Confusing pairs
182(1)
Words and phrases from other languages
183(2)
4.2 Abbreviations
185(4)
Types of abbreviation
185(1)
Common abbreviations
186(1)
Punctuation
187(1)
Duplicate abbreviations
187(1)
Abbreviations in writing
187(1)
Practice
188(1)
4.3 Academic Vocabulary: Nouns and Adjectives
189(7)
Introduction
189(1)
Nouns
189(2)
Nouns and adjectives
191(1)
Confusing nouns and adjectives
191(1)
Practice A
192(1)
Similar adjectives
193(1)
Academic adjectives
193(1)
Practice B
194(1)
Practice C
195(1)
4.4 Academic Vocabulary: Verbs and Adverbs
196(6)
Understanding main verbs
196(2)
Using verbs of reference
198(1)
Practice A
198(1)
Further verbs of reference
199(1)
Practice B
199(1)
Using adverbs
199(2)
Practice C
201(1)
Practice D
201(1)
4.5 Conjunctions
202(5)
How conjunctions work
202(1)
Types of conjunctions
203(1)
Common conjunctions
204(1)
Practice A
204(1)
Practice B
205(1)
Confusing conjunctions
205(1)
Conjunctions of opposition
205(1)
Practice C
206(1)
4.6 Prefixes and Suffixes
207(4)
How prefixes and suffixes work
207(1)
Prefixes
208(1)
Practice A
209(1)
Suffixes
209(1)
Practice B
210(1)
Practice C
210(1)
4.7 Prepositions
211(5)
Using prepositions
211(1)
Practice A
212(1)
Prepositions and nouns
212(1)
Prepositions in phrases
213(1)
Prepositions of place and time
213(1)
Practice B
213(1)
Verbs and prepositions
214(1)
Practice C
215(1)
4.8 Synonyms
216(7)
How synonyms work
216(1)
Common synonyms in academic writing
217(1)
Practice A
217(1)
Practice B
218(1)
Practice C
218(1)
Progress check 4
219(4)
Part 5 Writing Models
223(34)
5.1 Case Studies
225(4)
Using case studies
225(1)
Model case study
226(3)
5.2 Literature Reviews and Book Reviews
229(5)
Literature reviews
229(1)
Example literature review
230(2)
Book reviews
232(1)
Model book review
232(2)
5.3 Writing Longer Papers
234(8)
Planning your work
234(2)
Example essay
236(5)
Revision
241(1)
5.4 Reports
242(7)
Writing reports
242(1)
Essays and reports
243(1)
Practice
244(1)
Scientific reports
244(2)
Example report: Student experience of part-time work
246(3)
5.5 Writing Letters and Emails
249(4)
Letters
249(2)
Practice A
251(1)
Emails
251(1)
Practice B
252(1)
Practice C
252(1)
5.6 Writing in Groups
253(4)
Why write in groups?
253(1)
Making group work successful
254(2)
Dealing with problems
256(1)
Points to remember
256(1)
Glossary
257(4)
Answers
261(49)
Part 1 The Writing Process
262(16)
Part 2 Elements of Writing
278(9)
Part 3 Language Issues
287(7)
Part 4 Vocabulary for Writing
294(10)
Part 5 Writing Models
304(6)
Index 310
Stephen Bailey has taught English for Academic Purposes at the University of Nottingham and Derby University. Previously he taught students in Barcelona, Tokyo, Johor Bahru and Prague. He now lives in Derbyshire with his wife and daughter. His other books include Academic Writing for International Students of Business (Routledge) and The Essentials of Academic Writing for International Students (Routledge).

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