Analytical Chemistry [Kõva köide]

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  • Formaat: Hardback, 941 pages, kõrgus x laius x paksus: 300x216x49 mm, kaal: 2240 g, colour and b&w illustrations
  • Ilmumisaeg: 23-Feb-1998
  • Kirjastus: Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH
  • ISBN-10: 3527286101
  • ISBN-13: 9783527286102
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  • Formaat: Hardback, 941 pages, kõrgus x laius x paksus: 300x216x49 mm, kaal: 2240 g, colour and b&w illustrations
  • Ilmumisaeg: 23-Feb-1998
  • Kirjastus: Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH
  • ISBN-10: 3527286101
  • ISBN-13: 9783527286102
Teised raamatud teemal:
The Division of Analytical Chemistry (DAC) of the Federation of European Chemical Societies are the proud parents of this hefty overview of analytical chemistry. Coverage includes everything from sampling, quality assurance, chemical analysis, sensors, and spectroscopic methods, to chemometrics and applications of total analysis systems to real problems. Numerous problems and worked examples help students develop a solid understanding of the material covered. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

Analytical Chemistry is a book with an aim:
To offer chemistry students worldwide a cohesive, clearly structured overview of analytical chemistry. Modern, stimulating and completely up-to-date.

This is a book with committed supporters:
Analytical Chemistry is the offspring of the Division of Analytical Chemistry (DAC) of the Federation of European Chemical Societies. Experts who care about future experts

... and with illustrious authors:
Contributors of international stature and impressive background include
K. Cammann (Germany), G. D. Christian (USA), P. Van Espen (Belgium), H. Friebolin (Germany), K. Fuwa (Japan), J. G. Grasselli (USA), M. Grasserbauer (Austria), D. B. Griepink (Belgium), E. A. H. Hall (U.K.), E. H. Hansen (Denmark), V. Krivan (Germany), W. E. van der Linden (The Netherlands), A. Manz (U.K.), W. M. A. Niessen (The Netherlands), L. Niinisto (Finland), D. Perez Bendito (Spain), W. S. Sheldrick (Germany), K. Toth (Hungary), W. Wegscheider (Austria), P. G. Zambonin (Italy). Each of these names is an endorsement of the quality and authority of Analytical Chemistry.

Richly illustrated, learning objectives precede each chapter. Numerous problems and worked examples help students develop a solid understanding of the material covered. This textbook covers everything that the aspiring analytical chemist needs to know: from sampling, quality assurance, chemical analysis, sensors, spectroscopic methods, to chemometrics and applications of total analysis systems to real problems.

Also available in hardcover.






Arvustused

"Analytical Chemistry will serve as an excellent text as well as a valued reference following completion of the student's course of study." Journal of Medicinal Chemistry "...this textbook should find his place in the libraries of all (not only European) universities as well as because of a rather moderate price for a soft cover issue on the shelves of each chemistry student." Chem. Anal. "It is a book that should be on the shelves of all analytical chemistry and biochemistry professionals, including those who work in the areas of clinical chemistry, food chemistry and forensic chemistry." Bulletin of the World Health Organisation "This book is probably the most comprehensive source of information available today to those who work in or need to know about laboratory services in developing countries. It can be recommended as a basic document for laboratory technicians, technologists, and medicinal doctors at all levels in developing countries, as well as managers and suppliers of laboratory equipment and products." Bulletin of the World Health Organisation

Symbols
XIX(2)
Abbreviations and acronyms XXI
Part I General Topics 1(68)
1 Aims of Analytical Chemistry and its Importance for Society
3(22)
1.1 Aims of Analytical Chemistry: Its Basic Importance for Society
3(4)
1.2 Aims of Analytical Chemistry: The Analytical Chemist as a Problem Solver
7(10)
1.3 Aims of Analytical Chemistry as Done by Nonroutine-Laboratories
17(8)
2 The Analytical Process
25(16)
2.1 Introduction
25(1)
2.2 The Total Analytical Process
26(3)
2.3 Performance Characteristics
29(2)
2.4 Errors in Analytical Chemistry
31(10)
3 Quality Assurance and Quality Control
41(28)
3.1 Quality and Objectives of Analytical Chemistry
41(2)
3.2 The Analytical Method
43(12)
3.3 How to Achieve Accuracy
55(5)
3.4 Regulatory Aspects of QA and QC
60(4)
3.5 Conclusion
64(5)
Part II Chemical Analysis 69(362)
4 Fundamentals of Chemical Analysis
71(86)
4.1 Equilibria in Homogeneous Systems
73(16)
4.2 Acid-Base Equilibria
89(14)
4.3 Complex Formation
103(12)
4.4 Redox Systems
115(10)
4.5 Heterogeneous Equilibria
125(32)
5 Chromatography
157(70)
5.1 Fundamentals of Chromatographic Separations
159(12)
5.2 Gas Chromatography
171(14)
5.3 Liquid Chromatography
185(24)
5.4 Supercritical Fluid Chromatography
209(4)
5.5 Electrophoresis
213(6)
5.6 Field-flow Fractionation
219(8)
6 Kinetics and Catalysis
227(26)
6.1 Introduction
227(1)
6.2 The Chemical Reaction Rate
227(10)
6.3 The Phenomenon of Catalysis
237(10)
6.4 Monitoring of the Analytical Signal in Kinetic and Catalytic Methods
247(6)
7 Methods of Chemical Analysis and their Applications
253(178)
7.1 Titrimetry (Volumetry)
255(18)
7.2 Gravimetry
273(8)
7.3 Electroanalysis
281(40)
7.4 Flow Injection Analysis
321(18)
7.5 Thermal Analysis
339(16)
7.6 Elemental Organic Analysis
355(4)
7.7 Chemical Sensors
359(16)
7.8 Biosensors
375(30)
7.9 Immunoassay
405(26)
Part III Physical Analysis 431(276)
8 Elemental Analysis
433(94)
8.1 Atomic Emission Spectrometry
435(18)
8.2 Atomic Absorption Spectrometry
453(12)
8.3 X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry
465(26)
8.4 Activation Analysis
491(26)
8.5 Inorganic Mass Spectrometry
517(10)
9 Compound and Molecule Specific Analysis
527(114)
9.1 UV-VIS Spectrometry, Emission and Luminescence
527(14)
9.2 Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy
541(26)
9.3 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy
567(36)
9.4 Analytical Mass Spectrometry
603(38)
10 Microbeam and Surface Analysis
641(48)
10.1 Photon Probe Techniques
642(4)
10.2 Electron Probe Techniques
646(16)
10.3 Ion Probe Techniques
662(11)
10.4 Field Probe Techniques
673(2)
10.5 Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM) Techniques
675(14)
11 Structural Analysis
689(18)
11.1 General Philosophy
689(2)
11.2 X-Ray Diffraction
691(16)
Part IV Computer-Based Analytical Chemistry (COBAC) 707(118)
12 Chemometrics
709(100)
12.1 Analytical Quality Criteria and Performance Tests
709(26)
12.2 Calibration
735(12)
12.3 Signal Processing
747(12)
12.4 Optimization and Experimental Design
759(16)
12.5 Multivariate Methods
775(34)
13 Computer Hard- and Software and Interfacing Analytical Instruments
809(16)
13.1 The Computer-Based Laboratory
809(5)
13.2 Analytical Databases
814(11)
Part V Total Analysis Systems 825(56)
14 Hyphenated Techniques
827(30)
14.1 Introduction
827(1)
14.2 Hyphenated Gas Chromatographic Systems
828(15)
14.3 Hyphenated Liquid Chromatographic Systems
843(10)
14.4 Other Techniques
853(4)
15 Miniaturized Analytical Systems
857(6)
15.1 Principles
857(1)
15.2 Microfabrication
858(1)
15.3 Examples and Experimental Results
859(4)
16 Process Analytical Chemistry
863(18)
16.1 What is Process Analysis?
863(1)
16.2 Why do Process Analysis?
863(1)
16.3 How does Process Analysis Differ from Laboratory Analysis?
864(1)
16.4 Process Analytical Techniques and Their Applications
864(9)
16.5 Sampling Strategies (Analyzer/Process Interface)
873(3)
16.6 Process Control Strategies via Process Analyzers
876(1)
16.7 Future of Process Analysis
877(4)
Appendix 881(22)
1 Key to Literature 883(2)
2 List of SI Units 885(2)
3 Collection of Data 887(7)
4 Laser Principles and Characteristics 894(2)
5 Colthup Table 896(1)
6 Statistical Tables 897(2)
7 Matrix Algebra 899(4)
Index 903