Bacterial Pathogenesis 2nd Revised edition [Pehme köide]

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  • Formaat: Paperback / softback, 560 pages, kõrgus x laius x paksus: 300x275x23 mm, kaal: 1128 g, illustrations
  • Ilmumisaeg: 14-Jan-2002
  • Kirjastus: American Society for Microbiology
  • ISBN-10: 155581171X
  • ISBN-13: 9781555811716
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  • Formaat: Paperback / softback, 560 pages, kõrgus x laius x paksus: 300x275x23 mm, kaal: 1128 g, illustrations
  • Ilmumisaeg: 14-Jan-2002
  • Kirjastus: American Society for Microbiology
  • ISBN-10: 155581171X
  • ISBN-13: 9781555811716
Teised raamatud teemal:
The new edition of a textbook that places more emphasis than the first edition on recent research related to the genome maps of bacterium and the cell biology of the interaction between bacterial pathogens and host cells. After an introductory section detailing the broad outlines of the topic, including diagnosis and characterizations of bacterial infections, as well as various preventative strategies, the bulk of the work consists of chapters devoted to explaining specific bacterial pathogens. Pathogens discussed include the spirochetes, yersinia pestis, staphylococcus species, streptococci, enterococci, bordetella pertussis, anthrax, vibrio cholerae, and others. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Preface xv
Foreword xix
PART I Basic Principles 1(184)
The Uneasy Truce: Never Underestimate the Power of Bacteria
3(16)
Why Bacteria Are Once Again in the Public Health Spotlight
3(1)
Ancient History Takes a Toll on Today's Human Health
4(1)
Pressing Current Issues
5(9)
Emerging and Reemerging Infectious Diseases
6(4)
Food-Borne and Water-Borne Infections
10(1)
Modern Medicine as a Source of New Diseases
11(1)
Microbiota Shift Diseases
11(1)
Genomics
12(1)
Bioterrorism
13(1)
New Solutions, New Hope
14(1)
New Respect for Prevention
14(1)
Surveillance--an Early Warning System
14(1)
Making Hospitals Safe for Patients
15(1)
And Now for the Really Good News--You've Got a Bacterial Infection
15(1)
Selected Readings
16(1)
Summary Outline
17(1)
Questions
18(1)
Approaching and Studying Bacterial Diseases
19(15)
Microbes and Disease
19(5)
Establishing a Connection--Koch's Postulates
19(3)
Concepts of Disease
22(2)
Measuring Infectivity and Virulence
24(1)
Animal Models
24(7)
Tissue Culture and Organ Culture Models
28(3)
Good Information about the Pathology of a Disease
31(1)
Selected Readings
31(1)
Summary Outline
31(2)
Questions
33(1)
Molecular Approaches to the Diagnosis and Characterization of Bacterial Infections
34(19)
Seeking Insights into Virulence
34(2)
Molecular Koch's Postulates
34(1)
Virulence as a Complex Phenomenon
34(1)
The Importance of Bacterial Physiology
35(1)
Molecular Microbe Hunting
36(4)
Role of Molecular Methods in Diagnosis
36(2)
PCR
38(1)
Checkerboard Hybridization
38(2)
RAPID-PCR
40(2)
Ligase Chain Reaction
40(1)
Ribotyping or Insertion Sequence Typing Using Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms (RFLP)
41(1)
PFGE
42(1)
Identifying Virulence Factors Experimentally
42(8)
Cloning, Transposon Mutagenesis, and Transcriptional Fusions
42(4)
Finding Genes That Are Expressed In Vivo
46(2)
Signature-Tagged Mutagenesis
48(1)
Molecular Mania--a Boon or a Boondoggle?
48(2)
Selected Readings
50(1)
Summary Outline
50(2)
Questions
52(1)
The First Line of Defense Against Infection: Prevention and the Phagocytic Cell Response
53(16)
An Ounce of Prevention
53(1)
The Human Brain--the First Line of Defense against Infection
53(1)
Nonspecific and Specific Defenses
54(3)
Definitions
54(1)
Connections between Nonspecific and Specific Defense Systems
54(2)
Fashion Statement
56(1)
Epithelia
57(1)
Defenses of Skin
57(3)
Chemical and Physical Barriers to Bacterial Colonization
57(1)
Normal Microbiota
58(1)
Defenses of the Dermis
59(1)
When Skin Is Breached
59(1)
Common Themes
59(1)
Defenses of Mucosal Surfaces
60(1)
Phagocytes and Nonspecific Cytotoxic Cells: Defende of Blood and Tissue
60(5)
A Versatile Defense Force
60(2)
Distribution of Phagocytic and Cytotoxic Cells
62(2)
How Phagocytes Kill Bacteria
64(1)
Just Say NO
65(1)
Collateral Damage
65(1)
Killing by Nonspecific Cytotoxic Cells
65(1)
Selected Readings
65(1)
Summary Outline
66(2)
Questions
68(1)
The First Line of Defense, Continued: Complement, Chemokines, and Cytokines
69(15)
Characteristics and Roles of Complement
69(2)
Steps in Complement Activation
71(1)
Role of Cytokines and Chemokines in Directing the Phagocyte Response
72(4)
Other Activities of Cytokines
76(1)
Stress and Resistance to Disease: Connections between the Nervous System and the Immune System
77(1)
The Dark Side of the Nonspecific Defenses: Septic Shock
77(4)
Selected Readings
81(1)
Summary Outline
81(2)
Questions
83(1)
The Second Line of Defense: Antibodies and Cytotoxic T Cells
84(17)
Antibodies
84(4)
Characteristics of Antibodies and Their Diverse Roles in Preventing Infection
84(1)
Serum Antibodies
85(2)
Secretory Antibodies--Antibodies That Protect Mucosal Surfaces
87(1)
Affinity and Avidity
87(1)
Cytotoxic T Cells
88(1)
Production of Activated Cytotoxic T Cells and Antibodies
88(5)
Processing of Protein Antigens by APCs
88(2)
Interaction between APCs and T Cells: The T-Cell-Dependent Response
90(1)
The Th1/Th2 View of Immunity Development
91(1)
Production of Antibodies by B Cells
91(1)
Links to Nonspecific Defenses
92(1)
T-Independent Antigens
92(1)
Mucosal Immunity
93(2)
Development of the Specific Response System from Infancy to Adulthood
95(1)
The Dark Side of the Specific Defenses--Autoimmune Disease
95(1)
Selected Readings
96(1)
Summary Outline
96(4)
Questions
100(1)
Vaccination--an Underappreciated Component of the Modern Medical Armamentarium
101(14)
Vaccines--a Major Health Care Bargain
101(2)
The Current Vaccine Situation
101(2)
A New Form of Child Abuse (as if We Needed One)
103(2)
The Success Stories
105(3)
The Less-than-Success Stories
108(3)
New Directions
111(1)
Passive Immunization
112(1)
Selected Readings
112(1)
Summary Outline
113(1)
Questions
114(1)
Bacterial Strategies for Evading or Surviving the Defense Systems of the Human Body
115(16)
Overview of Bacterial Defense Strategies
115(1)
Colonization and Invasion of Host Surfaces
116(7)
Penetrating Intact Skin
116(1)
Penetrating the Mucin Layer
116(1)
Resisting Antibacterial Peptides
117(1)
Adherence
117(4)
sIgA Proteases
121(1)
Iron Acquisition Mechanisms
121(1)
Invasion and Intracellular Residence
122(1)
Evading Complement, Phagocytes, and the Antibody Response
123(1)
Capsules
123(4)
Resistance to Nitric Oxide
124(1)
Other Strategies for Circumventing Complement and Phagocytes
124(1)
Surviving Phagocytosis
124(1)
Evading the Host's Antibody Response
124(2)
The Opportunists
126(1)
Selected Readings
127(1)
Summary Outline
128(2)
Questions
130(1)
Bacterial Exotoxins: Important but Still a Mystery
131(19)
Exotoxins, Toxic Proteins Produced by Bacteria
131(7)
Transparent Mechanisms, Mysterious Purposes
131(1)
Characteristics and Nomenclature
132(1)
Exotoxin Structure and Function
133(2)
Secretion and Excretion of Exotoxins
135(3)
Examples of Diseases Caused by Toxins
138(9)
Diphtheria
138(4)
Botulism and Tetanus
142(3)
Wound Infections
145(1)
Toxins and Shock
146(1)
Pasteurellosis
147(1)
Selected Readings
147(1)
Summary Outline
148(1)
Questions
149(1)
Antimicrobial Compounds
150(18)
Antimicrobial Compounds: the Safety Net of Modern Medicine
150(1)
Importance of Antimicrobial Compounds
150(1)
Killing versus Inhibiting Growth
151(1)
Antiseptics and Disinfectants
151(1)
Mechanisms of Action
151(1)
Resistance to Antiseptics and Disinfectants
152(1)
Antibiotics
152(4)
Characteristics of Antibiotics
152(3)
The Process of Antibiotic Discovery
155(1)
The Economics of Antibiotic Discovery
156(1)
Mechanisms of Antibiotic Action
156(7)
Targets of Antibiotic Action
156(1)
Cell Wall Synthesis Inhibitors
157(1)
Protein Synthesis Inhibitors
158(3)
Quinolones--a Class of Antibiotics That Targets DNA Replication
161(1)
Rifampin--an Inhibitor of RNA Synthesis
162(1)
Trimethoprim and Sulfonamides
162(1)
Metronidazole
162(1)
The Newest Antibiotics
162(1)
The Continuing Challenge
163(1)
Selected Readings
164(1)
Summary Outline
165(2)
Questions
167(1)
How Bacteria Become Resistant to Antibiotics
168(17)
The Dawning of Awareness
168(2)
Mechanisms of Antibiotic Resistance
170(7)
Overview of Resistance Mechanisms
170(1)
Limiting Access of the Antibiotic
170(1)
Enzymatic Inactivation of the Antibiotic
171(1)
Active Efflux of the Antibiotic
172(1)
Modification or Protection of the Antibiotic Target
173(2)
Failure to Activate an Antibiotic
175(1)
Regulation of Resistance Genes
175(1)
Cross-Resistance and Linkage
176(1)
Antibiotic Tolerance
177(1)
Transfer of Resistance Genes
177(3)
Why Mutation Is Often Not the Preferred Solution
177(1)
Plasmids
178(1)
Transposons and Integrons
178(1)
Conjugative Transposons
179(1)
Will We Return to the Preantibiotic Era?
180(1)
Selected Readings
181(1)
Summary Outline
182(2)
Questions
184(1)
PART II Specific Bacterial Pathogens 185(276)
The Spirochetes: Borrelia burgdorferi and Treponema pallidum
187(15)
Lyme Disease
188(1)
Features of B. burgdorferi
188(2)
Morphology and Physiology
188(2)
Borrelia Plasmids
190(1)
The Borrelia Genome Sequence--Some Clues but Still Many Mysteries
190(2)
The Tick-Mammal Cycle
192(1)
Response of B. burgdorferi to Its Arthropod and Mammalian Hosts
192(3)
Osps
192(1)
Leaving the Bloodstream
193(1)
The Lyme Disease Vaccine
193(1)
Chronic Lyme Disease
194(1)
Variation in the Severity of the Disease--Coinfection Confounds the Problem
194(1)
Studying Virulence Factors of B. burgdorferi
195(1)
Special Difficulties
195(1)
Animal Models
195(1)
Diagnosis and Prevention of Lyme Disease
195(2)
Diagnosis
195(1)
Prevention and Treatment
196(1)
Syphilis and Lyme Disease: Two Spirochetal Diseases with a Similar Pathology but a Different Ecology
197(1)
Progression of Syphilis
197(1)
Diagnosis and Treatment of Syphilis
198(1)
Taking Stock
198(1)
Selected Readings
199(1)
Summary Outline
200(1)
Questions
201(1)
Yersinia pestis, the Cause of Plague, and Its Relatives
202(14)
The Rich and Terrible History of Yersinia pestis
202(6)
Biological Warfare in the 14th Century
203(1)
Modern Interest in Y. pestis
204(1)
Characteristics of Y. pestis and Plague
204(3)
Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, Food-Borne Relatives of Y. pestis
207(1)
Yersinia Plasmids
207(1)
Virulence Factors of Y. pestis, Y. enterocolitica, and Y. pseudotuberculosis
208(5)
Virulence Factors Unique to Y. pestis
211(1)
Survival in the Mammalian Body
212(1)
Future Directions
213(1)
Selected Readings
213(1)
Summary Outline
214(1)
Questions
215(1)
Staphylococcus Species
216(16)
The Many Types of Staphylococcal Infections
216(3)
S. aureus
217(1)
Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci: S. epidermidis and S. saprophyticus
217(1)
Emerging Antibiotic Resistance, a Developing Horror Story
218(1)
Characteristics of Staphylococci
219(1)
Colonization of the Human Body
219(1)
Key Features of the Staphylococci
219(1)
Virulence Factors of S. aureus
220(7)
Virulence Factors
220(7)
Virulence Factors of the Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci
227(1)
S. epidermidis
227(1)
S. saprophyticus
228(1)
Future Directions
228(1)
Selected Readings
229(1)
Summary Outline
229(1)
Questions
230(2)
Group A and Group B Streptococci and Enterococci
232(15)
A Closer Look at Diseases Caused by Streptococci
233(3)
The Changing Spectrum of Group A Streptococcal Disease
233(1)
Understanding Disease Diversity
234(2)
Group B Streptococci and Enterococci--Emerging Human Pathogens
236(1)
Group B Streptococci
236(1)
Enterococcal Infections
237(1)
Virulence Factors
237(8)
Group A Streptococci
237(4)
Regulation of Virulence Factors
241(1)
Virulence Factors of Group B Streptococci
241(1)
Enterococcus Virulence Factors
242(3)
Selected Readings
245(1)
Summary Outline
245(1)
Questions
246(1)
Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Related Species, a Lesson in Versatility
247(16)
A Consummate Opportunist
247(1)
Characteristics of P. aeruginosa
248(1)
Types of Infections
249(2)
Virulence Factors
251(9)
Measuring Virulence--Model Systems Raise Exciting New Possibilities
251(1)
Overview of the Disease Process
252(1)
Adhesins
253(1)
The Type III Secretion System
254(1)
ExoS and ExoU
254(1)
Exotoxin A
255(1)
Elastolytic Activity
255(2)
Other Extracellular Factors
257(1)
Alginate Production
257(2)
LPS Variation
259(1)
Antibiotic Resistance
259(1)
Future Directions
260(1)
Selected Readings
260(1)
Summary Outline
261(1)
Questions
262(1)
Bordetella pertussis
263(13)
Whooping Cough
263(1)
Characteristics of the Disease
263(1)
The Vaccine Dilemma
264(1)
Overview of the Infection Process
264(1)
Virulence Factors
264(6)
Model Systems
264(3)
Adherence
267(1)
Toxins
268(1)
B. pertussis and Phagocytic Cells
269(1)
Is There a Type III Secretion System?
270(1)
Type IV Secretion System
270(1)
Regulation of Virulence Genes
270(2)
Phenotypic Modulation (Transcriptional Regulation)
270(2)
Phase Variation
272(1)
Prevention and Treatment
272(1)
Selected Readings
272(1)
Summary Outline
273(2)
Questions
275(1)
Streptococcus pneumoniae
276(15)
Pneumococcal Disease
276(3)
Characteristics of S. pneumoniae
277(1)
Progression of Pneumococcal Disease
278(1)
Virulence Factors of S. pneumoniae
279(6)
Animal and Cell Culture Models
279(1)
Colonization of the Nose and Throat and Entry into the Lung
279(1)
Survival in the Lung
280(2)
Ability To Evoke an Inflammatory Response
282(1)
Interaction with the Blood-Brain Barrier
283(1)
Signature-Tagged Mutagenesis
283(1)
Antibiotic Resistance
283(1)
Natural Transformation
284(1)
Prevention and Treatment
285(2)
Antibiotic Therapy
285(1)
Vaccines
286(1)
Selected Readings
287(1)
Summary Outline
288(1)
Questions
289(2)
Tuberculosis
291(20)
A Disease of the Past Returns To Haunt the Future
291(2)
Nothing Fails Like Success
292(1)
Drug Resistance--a Worrisome New Development
292(1)
So Soon We Forget
292(1)
Spread and Progression of Tuberculosis
293(5)
Symptoms and Mode of Spread
293(1)
Progression of the Disease
293(4)
Latency and Persistence--Another TB Mystery
297(1)
Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Its Unusual Cell Wall--a Case of Fat Making for Lean and Mean
298(1)
Treatment of TB and the Challenge Posed by Drug-Resistant Strains
298(4)
Standard Treatment Options
298(2)
The Emergence of Resistance
300(1)
The W Strain--a Taste of Things To Come?
301(1)
The Search for New Drugs
301(1)
Diagnosis of TB
302(1)
Virulence Factors
303(3)
Studying Virulence Factors
303(1)
Entry into and Survival in Phagocytes
303(1)
Avoidance of the Activated Macrophage Response
304(1)
Ability To Elicit a Destructive Inflammatory Response
305(1)
Factors That Affect Host Susceptibility
305(1)
Immunity to TB
306(1)
BCG: a Widely Used but Controversial Vaccine
306(1)
BCG as a Carrier for Other Vaccine Antigens
306(1)
Selected Readings
307(1)
Summary Outline
307(2)
Questions
309(2)
Legionella pneumophila and Legionnaires' Disease
311(11)
The Dark Side of Modern Comforts: Air-Conditioning Turns Ugly
311(1)
Legionnaires' Disease
312(1)
The Natural Host?--a Free-Living Macrophage Equivalent
312(1)
Virulence Factors
313(5)
Problems with Determining Legionella Virulence Factors
313(1)
Survival in Amoebae
314(1)
Regulation of Virulence Genes
315(1)
Interaction with Mammalian Macrophages
316(1)
Damage to the Lung
317(1)
Prevention and Treatment
318(1)
Legionella as a Paradigm for Intracellular Pathogens
318(1)
Selected Readings
319(1)
Summary Outline
319(2)
Questions
321(1)
Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae
322(10)
Lifestyles of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae
322(3)
Characteristics of Mycoplasma and Chlamydia Species
325(2)
Virulence Factors
327(2)
M. pneumoniae
327(1)
C. pneumoniae
328(1)
Selected Readings
329(1)
Summary Outline
329(2)
Questions
331(1)
Bacillus anthracis, the Cause of Anthrax
332(7)
Features of the Disease
332(1)
Virulence Factors
333(2)
Ability To Germinate and Survive in Macrophages
333(1)
Toxins
334(1)
Antiphagocytic Capsule
335(1)
Prevention of Anthrax
335(1)
Selected Readings
336(1)
Summary Outline
337(1)
Questions
338(1)
Helicobacter pylori, a Resourceful Gastric Pathogen
339(13)
A Revolution in Gastroenterology
339(3)
Good News--You're Infected!
339(1)
The Long Road to Acceptance
340(1)
The H. pylori-Inspired ``Gold Rush''
340(2)
Characteristics of H. pylori
342(1)
Morphology and Metabolism
342(1)
Genomics
343(1)
Virulence Factors
343(3)
Animal Models
343(1)
Colonization of the Stomach Mucosa
344(1)
Eliciting an Inflammatory Response
345(1)
LPS--Immune Mimicry
346(1)
Type IV Secretion System
346(1)
Prevention and Treatment
346(3)
H. pylori Mysteries
349(1)
Selected Readings
349(1)
Summary Outline
350(1)
Questions
351(1)
Clostridium difficile and Pseudomembranous Colitis
352(11)
Pseudomembranous Colitis--a Disease Caused by Antibiotics
352(1)
Emergence of Pseudomembranous Colitis
352(1)
Characteristics of C. difficile
353(1)
Development and Ecology of the Disease
353(2)
Virulence Factors
355(4)
Toxins
355(3)
Other Virulence Factors
358(1)
Prevention and Treatment
359(1)
Selected Readings
360(1)
Summary Outline
361(1)
Questions
362(1)
Vibrio cholerae, the Cause of Cholera
363(18)
Pathogenesis and Epidemiology of Cholera
363(3)
Progression of the Disease
363(1)
History and Distribution of Cholera Outbreaks
364(2)
Solving the Cholera Problem
366(1)
Virulence Factors
366(9)
Overview
366(1)
Colonization of the Small Intestinal Mucosa
367(1)
Cholera Toxin
368(5)
Other Toxins Produced by V. cholerae
373(1)
Gene Capture--a Role for Integrons
374(1)
The Capsule of V. cholerae O139--a Difference, but Probably Not an Important One
374(1)
Antibiotic Resistance
374(1)
Transcriptional Regulation of Virulence Genes
375(1)
The ToxR/ToxS/ToxT Regulatory System
375(1)
Regulation in Response to Iron Levels
376(1)
Prevention and Treatment
376(1)
Oral Rehydration Therapy
376(1)
The Frustrating Search for a Safe and Effective Cholera Vaccine
377(1)
Future Directions
377(1)
Selected Readings
378(1)
Summary Outline
379(1)
Questions
380(1)
Salmonella Species
381(17)
Salmonella Species and Serogroups
381(1)
Diseases Caused by Salmonella Species
382(2)
S. typhimurium
382(1)
S. typhi
383(1)
Virulence Factors
384(8)
Animal Models
384(1)
Overview of the Disease Process
384(2)
Adherence and Invasion
386(5)
Host Factors That Affect Susceptibility to Salmonella Infections
391(1)
Why Is S. typhi So Invasive?
391(1)
Acid Tolerance Response
392(1)
Prevention and Treatment
392(2)
Antibiotic Therapy
392(1)
Vaccines
393(1)
Salmonella as a Basis for Other Vaccines
393(1)
Future Directions
394(1)
Selected Readings
394(1)
Summary Outline
395(2)
Questions
397(1)
Listeria monocytogenes, a Doubly Motile Pathogen
398(9)
Listeriosis
398(2)
Characteristics of Disease Caused by Listeria monocytogenes
398(2)
Listeria as a Model for Studies of the Cell-Mediated Immune Response and Cytoskeleton Formation
400(1)
Virulence Factors
400(4)
Animal and Cell Culture Model Systems
400(1)
Genetic System
400(1)
Motility
400(1)
Invasion and Cell-to-Cell Spread
400(1)
LLO (hly)
401(1)
PI-PLC (plcA) and PC-PLC (plcB)
402(1)
Metalloprotease
402(1)
Actin-Based Motility
402(1)
Systemic Spread of L. monocytogenes
403(1)
Organization and Regulation of Virulence Genes
404(1)
Prevention and Treatment
404(1)
Selected Readings
405(1)
Summary Outline
405(1)
Questions
406(1)
Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli Strains
407(15)
Different Types of Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli Strains
407(1)
Classification of Pathogenic E. coli Strains
408(3)
Serogroup and Serotype
408(1)
Virotype
408(3)
Virulence Factors
411(7)
ETEC Strains
411(1)
EAggEC Strains
412(2)
EPEC Strains
414(2)
EHEC Strains
416(1)
Prevention and Treatment
416(2)
Selected Readings
418(1)
Summary Outline
418(2)
Questions
420(2)
Escherichia coli Extraintestinal Infections
422(15)
Epidemiology of Urinary Tract Infections
422(2)
Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections
422(1)
Hospital-Acquired (Nosocomial) Urinary Tract Infections
423(1)
Virulence Factors of E. coli Strains That Cause Urinary Tract Infections
424(8)
Colonization of the Colon and Vagina
424(1)
Adhesins
425(1)
Invasion of Uroepithelial Cells
426(1)
Toxins
427(1)
Other Virulence Factors
427(1)
UPEC Strains--a Paradigm for Adhesion Biogenesis
428(1)
Organization and Regulation of Virulence Genes
429(3)
Meningitis and Other Disseminated Infections
432(1)
Virulence Factors Associated with Strains That Cause Meningitis, Pneumonia, and Septicemia
433(1)
Prevention and Treatment
433(1)
Selected Readings
434(1)
Summary Outline
434(2)
Questions
436(1)
Neisseria Species
437(15)
The Two Pathogenic Neisseria Species
437(1)
Types of Disease
438(1)
Commonalities
438(1)
Gonorrhea
438(2)
Gonorrhea--Still a Major Public Health Problem
438(1)
Just When We Thought We Were Seeing the Light at the End of the Tunnel, It Turned Out To Be the Headlight of an Oncoming Train
439(1)
What You Don't Know Can Hurt You: Complications of Gonorrhea
439(1)
Meningococcal Meningitis
440(1)
Virulence Factors
441(6)
N. gonorrhoeae
441(1)
How N. gonorrhoeae Evades the Host Defense Responses
442(5)
N. meningitidis
447(1)
Prevention and Treatment
447(2)
Gonorrhea
447(1)
Meningococcal Meningitis
448(1)
Selected Readings
449(1)
Summary Outline
449(2)
Questions
451(1)
Chlamydia trachomatis
452(9)
The Hidden Epidemic
452(2)
C. trachomatis--a Lot of Pathogenic Potential in a Very Small Package
454(2)
Virulence Factors
456(2)
Special Problems Faced by Scientists Working on Chlamydiae
456(1)
Adherence and Invasion by EBs
456(2)
Prevention and Treatment
458(1)
Closing Observations
459(1)
Selected Readings
459(1)
Summary Outline
459(1)
Questions
460(1)
APPENDIX 1 Overview of Bacterial Secretion Systems, Bacterial Adhesins and Their Mechanisms of Assembly, and Major Bacterial Toxins 461(6)
A. Secretion Systems of Bacteria
461(1)
B. Adhesins and Mechanisms of Assembly
462(2)
C. Major Bacterial Toxins
464(3)
APPENDIX 2 Answers to End-of-Chapter Questions 467(28)
Glossary 495(30)
Index 525