Conifers of the World: The Complete Reference [Kõva köide]

  • Formaat: Hardback, 720 pages, kõrgus x laius x paksus: 286x224x46 mm, kaal: 2159 g, 67 colour photos, 295 b&w photos, 240 line drawings, 67 distribution maps
  • Ilmumisaeg: 06-Oct-2009
  • Kirjastus: Timber Press
  • ISBN-10: 0881929743
  • ISBN-13: 9780881929744
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  • Formaat: Hardback, 720 pages, kõrgus x laius x paksus: 286x224x46 mm, kaal: 2159 g, 67 colour photos, 295 b&w photos, 240 line drawings, 67 distribution maps
  • Ilmumisaeg: 06-Oct-2009
  • Kirjastus: Timber Press
  • ISBN-10: 0881929743
  • ISBN-13: 9780881929744
Teised raamatud teemal:
Researched for more than three decades, this definitive work provides up-to-date descriptions of all the true conifers of the world, including 545 species of trees and shrubs. Written for accessibility to both horticultural and botanical audiences, it is the first comprehensive update of conifer taxonomy in nearly a century. Noted conifer taxonomist James E. Eckenwalder also discusses the relationships among the groups, practical usages, champion trees, fossil occurrences, and biology. New identification guides for the families and genera are based whenever possible on foliage features and thus should be easier to use than traditional conifer keys, which focus on seasonal, and often microscopic, cone characters. Eckenwalder shares the reasoning behind his taxonomic decisions, many of which are unique to this book, reflecting a comprehensive reevaluation of conifer classification. He also outlines the features sought in cultivars of each genus, particular cultivation concerns, and conifers recommended for cultivation under various conditions and to achieve different effects. Some 3,000 cultivars have been available in recent times, more than five times the total number of conifer species. Several hundred original illustrations include drawings of the seed cones for all genera as well as for representative species. Maps of the natural distribution of each genus allow for easy comparison of ranges. Handsome black-and-white photographs of species in their natural habitats and attractive color photos further enrich the volume. More than 100 images reproduce foliage of many genera as an aid in identification. With its unprecedented attention to detail and extensive bibliography, this major work is an essential reference for botanists, naturalists, and horticulturists.

Arvustused

James E. Eckenwalder has not just written a book about trees, he has created an epic work that may well stand for years as the definitive source for information about conifers. -- Ernie Cowan North County Times 20091213

Preface 8(2)
Acknowledgments 10(3)
Conifer Classification
13(8)
What Are Conifers?
13(1)
Taxonomy of Conifers
14(1)
Are Gymnosperms a Real Taxonomic Group?
15(1)
Which Plants Should Be Included Among the Conifers?
15(1)
Family Problems
16(1)
How Many Genera of Conifers Are There?
17(1)
The Limits of Species
18(1)
Subspecies Versus Varieties
19(2)
Conifer Names
21(8)
Scientific Names
21(3)
Cultivar Names
24(1)
Common Names
25(1)
Discovery of Conifer Genera and Species
26(3)
Conifers in Nature and in the Garden
29(14)
Geographic Distribution of Conifers
29(1)
Latitudinal and Elevational Ranges
29(2)
Richness of Conifer Floras
31(3)
Conifers in Horticulture
34(2)
Cultivars of Conifers
36(1)
Garden Uses of Conifers
37(1)
Conservation of Conifers
37(6)
Conifer Morphology
43(18)
Roots
43(1)
Branches and Crown
44(1)
Truck and Bark
44(2)
Branchlets and Buds
46(1)
Leaves and Leaf Arrangements
47(4)
Microscopic Structure of Leaves
51(3)
Pollen Cones
54(1)
Seed Cones
55(4)
Conifer Traits as Adaptations
59(2)
Paleobotany and Evolution
61(4)
Conifer Identification
65(4)
Evergreen or Deciduous?
65(1)
Do Seed Cones Mature in One, Two, or Three Growing Seasons?
66(1)
Sex Distribution in Conifers
67(1)
How to Use the Identification Guides
68(1)
Seed Plants and Conifer Families
69(8)
Araucariaceae
70(1)
Cupressaceae
70(2)
Pinaceae
72(1)
Podocarpaceae
73(2)
Sciadopityaceae
75(1)
Taxaceae
75(2)
Conifer Genera and Species
77(555)
Abies
77(42)
Acmopyle
119(3)
Actinostrobus
122(2)
Afrocarpus
124(4)
Agathis
128(15)
Amentotaxus
143(5)
Araucaria
148(18)
Athrotaxis
166(4)
Austrocedrus
170(2)
Austrotaxus
172(2)
Callitris
174(9)
Calocedrus
183(5)
Cathaya
188(2)
Cedrus
190(3)
Cephalotaxus
193(7)
Chamaecyparis
200(6)
Cryptomeria
206(3)
Cunninghamia
209(3)
Cupressus
212(20)
Dacrycarpus
232(10)
Dacrydium
242(15)
Diselma
257(2)
Falcatifolium
259(4)
Fitzroya
263(2)
Fokienia
265(2)
Glyptostrobus
267(2)
Halocarpus
269(4)
Juniperus
273(39)
Keteleeria
312(4)
Lagarostrobos
316(2)
Larix
318(14)
Lepidothamnus
332(3)
Libocedrus
335(5)
Manoao
340(2)
Metasequoia
342(4)
Microbiota
346(2)
Microcachrys
348(1)
Microstrobos
349(3)
Nageia
352(5)
Neocallitropsis
357(1)
Nothotsuga
358(2)
Papuacedrus
360(2)
Parasitaxus
362(2)
Phyllocladus
364(6)
Picea
370(28)
Pinus
398(92)
Platycladus
490(2)
Podocarpus
492(61)
Prumnopitys
553(8)
Pseudolarix
561(3)
Pseudotaxus
564(2)
Pseudotsuga
566(8)
Retrophyllum
574(4)
Saxegothaea
578(2)
Sciadopitys
580(3)
Sequoia
583(3)
Sequoiadendron
586(2)
Taiwania
588(2)
Taxodium
590(4)
Taxus
594(7)
Tetraclinis
601(3)
Thuja
604(6)
Thujopsis
610(2)
Torreya
612(7)
Tsuga
619(8)
Widdringtonia
627(3)
Wollemia
630(2)
Appendix 1 Conversion Tables 632(1)
Appendix 2 Authorities for Scientific Names 633(7)
Appendix 3 Conifers with Distinctive Features 640(7)
Appendix 4 New Names 647(1)
Glossary 648(14)
Bibliography 662(27)
Index 689
James E. Eckenwalder is associate professor of plant systematics at the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Toronto, where he focuses on taxonomy, natural hybridization, and macroevolution. He graduated from Reed College in Portland, Oregon, and earned his doctorate from the University of California, Berkeley. His research, which has resulted in significant changes to conifer taxonomy, emphasizes the classification and evolution of vascular plants, especially trees. His interests include the theoretical and practical bases of plant classification, the tracing of evolutionary histories, the integration of different lines of taxonomic evidence into classifications, the most effective ways of incorporating taxonomically awkward organisms-especially hybrids and fossils-into classifications, and the testing of taxonomic hypotheses.