Conversation Analysis [Pehme köide]

(University of Essex)
  • Formaat: Paperback, 334 pages, kõrgus x laius x paksus: 247x174x15 mm, kaal: 670 g, 25 b/w illus. 1 table
  • Sari: Cambridge Textbooks in Linguistics
  • Ilmumisaeg: 08-Sep-2016
  • Kirjastus: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN-10: 0521157196
  • ISBN-13: 9780521157193
Teised raamatud teemal:
  • Formaat: Paperback, 334 pages, kõrgus x laius x paksus: 247x174x15 mm, kaal: 670 g, 25 b/w illus. 1 table
  • Sari: Cambridge Textbooks in Linguistics
  • Ilmumisaeg: 08-Sep-2016
  • Kirjastus: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN-10: 0521157196
  • ISBN-13: 9780521157193
Teised raamatud teemal:
We live our lives in conversation, building families, societies and civilisations. In over seven thousand languages across the world, the basic infrastructure by which we communicate remains the same. This is the first ever book-length linguistic introduction to conversation analysis (CA), the field that has done more than any other to illuminate the mechanics of interaction. Starting by locating CA by reference to a number of cognate disciplines investigating language in use, it provides an overview of the origins and methodology of CA. By using conversational data from a range of languages, it examines the basic apparatus of sequence organisation: turn-taking, preference, identity construction and repair. As the basis for these investigations, the book uses the twin analytic resources of action and sequence to throw new light on the origins and nature of language use.

Arvustused

'This exciting new book is authoritatively and engagingly written: the coverage of issues in conversation analysis and the organisation of conversation is first class.' Gareth Walker, Sheffield University

List of figures
xii
List of tables
xiii
Preface xv
Acknowledgements xix
1 Introduction: why study conversation?
1(34)
1.1 The basics: the `Two Things'
2(3)
1.2 The view from linguistics
5(23)
1.2.1 The search for meaning
5(18)
1.2.2 Observational approaches
23(5)
1.3 Beyond language: discourse analysis and CA
28(3)
1.4 Action and sequence: the implications
31(1)
1.5 The organisation of this volume and overview of chapters
32(3)
2 Towards an understanding of action: origins and perspectives
35(29)
2.1 On Goffman and Garfinkel
36(4)
2.2 Harvey Sacks: from ethnomethodology to conversation analysis
40(4)
2.3 Jefferson's transcription system
44(3)
2.4 Capturing phenomena
47(6)
2.4.1 Developments of the Jefferson system
52(1)
2.5 CA transcription conventions: an overview
53(11)
3 Why that, now? Position and composition in interaction
64(31)
3.1 On position and composition
64(4)
3.1.1 How position matters: What are you doing?
65(3)
3.2 Adjacency and the adjacency pair
68(8)
3.2.1 Adjacency and cross-linguistic validity
73(3)
3.3 Expansion beyond the adjacency pair
76(13)
3.3.1 Pre-expansion
77(5)
3.3.2 Insert expansion
82(2)
3.3.3 Post-expansions
84(5)
3.4 The sequence: coherence and distributed cognition
89(5)
3.5 Conclusion: `Sequence' as Infrastructure and Context
94(1)
4 Interaction in time: the centrality of turn-taking
95(45)
4.1 Turn-taking: an overview
96(1)
4.2 A Sketch of `A Simplest Systematics'
97(27)
4.2.1 The turn-constructional component
98(13)
4.2.2 The turn-allocational component
111(11)
4.2.3 Beyond the first TCU
122(2)
4.3 The turn-taking rules
124(2)
4.4 More Than One at a Time: `Interruption', Overlap and Choral Production
126(4)
4.5 No-one speaking: forms of silence
130(2)
4.6 Transforming silence: the role of grammar
132(2)
4.7 Local variation, universal system?
134(5)
4.8 Conclusion: grammar and social organisation in context
139(1)
5 The structure of sequences I: preference organisation
140(45)
5.1 Preference organisation: an introduction
141(27)
5.1.1 Preference and adjacency pairs
141(7)
5.1.2 Actions and formats: interactional implications
148(2)
5.1.3 An exception
150(1)
5.1.4 Between preferred and dispreferred: agendas, social norms and deontic authority in responsive turns
151(11)
5.1.5 Preference and action categories
162(6)
5.2 Preference and the recognition of action
168(2)
5.3 Preference in person reference
170(14)
5.3.1 Preference, principles and defaults in person reference
170(2)
5.3.2 Preference and grammaticalisation
172(7)
5.3.3 Departures from default usage
179(5)
5.4 Conclusion: preference in the turn and the sequence
184(1)
6 The structure of sequences II: knowledge and authority in the construction of identity
185(47)
6.1 Identity in CA: The `Membership Categorisation Device'
186(9)
6.1.1 Categories and collections of categories
189(4)
6.1.2 The rules of application
193(2)
6.2 Knowledge and authority as resources for action recognition
195(33)
6.2.1 Territories of knowledge in interaction
196(25)
6.2.2 Authority in interaction
221(7)
6.3 Conclusion: knowledge, authority and agency in indirection
228(4)
7 Halting progressivity: the organisation of repair
232(40)
7.1 Self-repair
236(11)
7.1.1 Self-initiated self-repair in same TCU
236(5)
7.1.2 Self-initiated transition-space repairs
241(2)
7.1.3 Third position repairs
243(2)
7.1.4 Self-initiated other-repair
245(2)
7.2 Other-repair
247(17)
7.2.1 Understanding checks
250(3)
7.2.2 Partial repeats
253(2)
7.2.3 Partial repeat + wh-word
255(2)
7.2.4 Wh-word
257(1)
7.2.5 Open class repair initiator
258(6)
7.3 Implicit forms of repair initiation: embodiment and gaze
264(6)
7.4 Conclusion: the defence of intersubjectivity
270(2)
8 Conclusion: discovering order
272(3)
References 275(30)
Author Index 305(4)
General Index 309
Rebecca Clift is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Language and Linguistics at the University of Essex. She is co-editor of Reporting Talk (Cambridge, 2006).

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