E-raamat: Corporate Finance For Dummies

  • Formaat: 368 pages, illustrations
  • Ilmumisaeg: 28-Nov-2012
  • Kirjastus: John Wiley & Sons Inc
  • ISBN-13: 9781118434819
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  • Formaat: 368 pages, illustrations
  • Ilmumisaeg: 28-Nov-2012
  • Kirjastus: John Wiley & Sons Inc
  • ISBN-13: 9781118434819

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Each book covers all the necessary information a beginner needs to know about a particular topic, providing an index for easy reference and using the series' signature set of symbols to clue the reader in to key topics, categorized under such titles as Tip, Remember, Warning!, Technical Stuff and True Story. Original.

Introduces beginners to corporate finance topics, including operating budgets, cash flow, major assets, financial statements, and derivatives.

The math, formulas, and problems associated with corporate finance can be daunting to the uninitiated. This guides introduces you to the practices of determining an operating budget, calculating future cash flow, and analyzing scenarios in a friendly, unintimidating way.

Score your highest in corporate finance

The math, formulas, and problems associated with corporate finance can be daunting to the uninitiated. Corporate Finance For Dummies introduces you to the practices of determining an operating budget, calculating future cash flow, and scenario analysis in a friendly, un-intimidating way that makes comprehension easy.

Corporate Finance For Dummies covers everything you'll encounter in a course on corporate finance, including accounting statements, cash flow, raising and managing capital, choosing investments; managing risk; determining dividends; mergers and acquisitions; and valuation.

  • Serves as an excellent resource to supplement coursework related to corporate finance
  • Gives you the tools and advice you need to understand corporate finance principles and strategies
  • Provides information on the risks and rewards associated with corporate finance and lending

With easy-to-understand explanations and examples, Corporate Finance For Dummies is a helpful study guide to accompany your coursework, explaining the tough stuff in a way you can understand.

Introduction 1(6)
About This Book
1(1)
Conventions Used in This Book
2(1)
Foolish Assumptions
2(1)
How This Book Is Organized
3(2)
Part I What's Unique about Corporate Finance
3(1)
Part II Reading Financial Statements as a Second Language
4(1)
Part III Valuations on the Price Tags of Business
4(1)
Part IV A Wonderland of Risk Management
4(1)
Part V Financial Management
4(1)
Part VI The Part of Tens
4(1)
Icons Used in This Book
5(1)
Where to Go from Here
5(2)
Part I What's Unique about Corporate Finance
7(36)
Chapter 1 Introducing Corporate Finance
9(8)
Corporate Finance and the Role of Money in the World
10(2)
Identifying What Makes Corporate Finance Unique
12(2)
Serving as an intermediary
12(1)
Analyzing interactions between people
13(1)
Recognizing How Corporate Finance Rules Your Life
14(1)
Becoming Proactive About Corporate Finance
15(2)
Chapter 2 Navigating the World of Corporate Finance
17(18)
Visiting the Main Attractions in Finance Land
17(13)
Corporations
18(1)
Depository institutions
19(1)
Insurance companies
20(2)
Securities firms
22(1)
Underwriters
23(1)
Funds
24(1)
Financing institutions
25(2)
Exchanges
27(1)
Regulatory bodies
27(1)
Federal Reserve and U.S. Treasury
28(2)
Meeting the People of Finance Land
30(3)
Entry-level positions
30(1)
Analysts
31(1)
Auditors
31(1)
Adjusters
31(1)
Executives and managers
31(1)
Traders
32(1)
Treasurers
32(1)
Other related positions
32(1)
Visiting the Finance Land Information Booth
33(2)
Internet sources
33(1)
Print sources
34(1)
Human sources
34(1)
Chapter 3 Raising Money for Business Purposes
35(8)
Raising Capital
35(1)
Raising Money by Acquiring Debt
36(4)
Asking the right people for money
37(1)
Making sure the loan pays off in the long run
38(1)
Looking at loan terms
39(1)
Raising Cash by Selling Equity
40(3)
Selling stock to the public
40(1)
Looking at the different types of stock
41(2)
Part II Reading Financial Statements as a Second Language
43(68)
Chapter 4 Proving Worth Using the Balance Sheet
45(12)
Introducing the Balance Sheet
45(1)
Evaluating the Weights on the Balance Scale
46(1)
Assets
46(5)
Current assets
47(1)
Long-term assets
48(3)
Intangible assets
51(1)
Other assets
51(1)
Liabilities
51(3)
Current liabilities
52(1)
Long-term liabilities
53(1)
Owners' Equity
54(2)
Preferred shares
54(1)
Common shares
55(1)
Treasury shares
55(1)
Additional paid-in capital
55(1)
Retained earnings
55(1)
Accumulated other comprehensive income
56(1)
Making Use of the Balance Sheet
56(1)
Chapter 5 Getting Paid with the Income Statement
57(8)
Adding Income and Subtracting Costs: What's on the Income Statement
57(7)
Gross profit
58(2)
Operating income
60(1)
Earnings before interest and taxes
61(1)
Net income
62(1)
Earnings per share
63(1)
Supplemental notes
63(1)
Putting the Income Statement to Good Use
64(1)
Chapter 6 Easy Come, Easy Go: Statement of Cash Flows
65(8)
Piecing Together a Puzzle of Cash Flows
65(5)
Operating activities cash flows
66(1)
Investing activities cash flows
67(1)
Financing activities cash flows
68(2)
Combining the three types of operations to get the net change in cash
70(1)
Using the Statement of Cash Flows
70(3)
Chapter 7 Making Financial Statements Useful with Metrics Analysis
73(22)
Being Able to Pay the Bills: Using Liquidity Metrics
74(8)
Days sales in receivables
74(1)
Accounts receivables turnover
75(1)
Accounts receivables turnover in days
75(1)
Days sales in inventory
76(1)
Inventory turnover
77(1)
Inventory turnover in days
77(1)
Operating cycle
78(1)
Working capital
78(1)
Current ratio
79(1)
Acid test ratio (aka: Quick Ratio)
80(1)
Cash ratio
80(1)
Sales to working capital
81(1)
Operating cash flows to current maturities
82(1)
Measuring Profit Generation and Management with Profitability Metrics
82(8)
Net profit margin
83(1)
Total asset turnover
83(1)
Return on assets
84(1)
Operating income margin
85(1)
Operating asset turnover
85(1)
Return on operating assets
86(1)
Return on total equity
86(1)
Return on common equity
87(1)
DuPont equation
87(1)
Fixed asset turnover
88(1)
Return on investment
89(1)
Gross profit margin
90(1)
Evaluating a Company's Debt Management with Debt Analytics
90(5)
Times interest earned
91(1)
Fixed charge coverage
91(1)
Debt ratio
92(1)
Debt to equity ratio
92(1)
Debt to tangible net worth
93(1)
Operating cash flows to total debt
94(1)
Equity multiplier
94(1)
Chapter 8 Measuring Financial Well-Being with Special Use Metrics
95(16)
Focusing on Earnings and Dividends with Analytics for Investors
96(11)
Financial leverage
96(1)
Earnings per common share
97(1)
Operating cash flows per share
97(1)
Price to earnings ratio
98(1)
Percentage of earnings retained
99(1)
Dividend payout
100(1)
Dividend yield
100(1)
Book value per share
101(1)
Cash dividend coverage ratio
102(1)
Generating Earnings from Interest: Analytics for Banks
102(1)
Earning assets to total assets ratio
103(1)
Net interest margin
103(1)
Loan loss coverage ratio
104(1)
Equity to total assets ratio
105(1)
Deposits times capital
105(1)
Loans to deposits ratio
106(1)
Using Analytics to Measure Operating Asset Management
107(4)
Operating ratio
107(1)
Percent earned on operating property
108(1)
Operating revenue to operating property ratio
108(1)
Long-term debt to operating property ratio
109(2)
Part III Valuations on the Price Tags of Business
111(70)
Chapter 9 Determining Present and Future Values: Time Is Money
113(8)
Losing Value over Time
114(2)
Inflation
114(1)
Interest rates
115(1)
Predicting Future Value
116(1)
Simple interest
116(1)
Compound interest
117(1)
Calculating the Present Value
117(4)
Taking a closer look at earnings
118(1)
Discounted cash flows
119(2)
Chapter 10 Bringing in the CAValry for Capital Asset Valuations
121(16)
Just What Is Capital Budgeting?
121(1)
Rating Your Returns
122(5)
Looking at costs
123(1)
Calculating revenue
124(1)
Calculating the accounting rate of return
124(1)
Making the most of the internal rate of return through modification
125(2)
Netting Present Values
127(2)
Calculating NPV over time
128(1)
Managing the project's value
128(1)
Determining the Payback Period
129(1)
Managing Capital Allocations
130(3)
Calculating the equivalent annual cost
130(1)
Considering liquid assets
131(2)
Looking at a Piece of Project Management
133(4)
Value schedule metrics
133(1)
Budget metrics
134(3)
Chapter 11 Bringing on Your Best Bond Bets
137(16)
Exploring the Different Types of Bonds
137(8)
Considering corporate bonds
138(1)
Gauging government bonds
138(3)
No more clipping with coupon bonds
141(1)
Forgoing periodic payments with zero-coupon bonds
141(1)
Sizing up asset-backed securities
141(1)
Having the best of two worlds with convertible bonds
142(1)
Using callable bonds to capitalize on interest rates
143(1)
Looking at the pros and cons of puttable bonds
143(1)
Getting the gist of registered bonds
144(1)
Being in the know about bearer bonds
144(1)
Counting on forgiveness with catastrophe bonds
144(1)
Understanding junk bonds
145(1)
Looking at Bond Rates
145(2)
Reading Bond Information
147(3)
Understanding Bond Valuation
150(3)
Chapter 12 Being Savvy When Shopping for Stock
153(16)
Exchanging Stocks
154(1)
Looking at the Different Types of Orders
154(3)
Market order
156(1)
Stop and limit orders
156(1)
Pegged order
157(1)
Time-contingent order
157(1)
Comparing Long and Short Stocks
157(3)
Buying long
158(1)
Buying on margin
158(1)
Selling short
159(1)
Defining Chips, Caps, and Sectors
160(2)
Chips
160(1)
Caps
161(1)
Sectors
162(1)
Knowing Where the Market Stands: The Bulls versus the Bears
162(1)
Watching Stock Indices
163(1)
Calculating the Value of Stocks
164(5)
Surveying equity valuation models
164(1)
Checking out corporate analysis
165(1)
Evaluating industry performance
166(1)
Factoring in stock market fluctuations
166(1)
Considering macroeconomics
167(2)
Chapter 13 Measuring Valuations of the Might-Be: Derivatives
169(12)
Introducing the Derivatives Market
169(4)
Buying or Selling --- Then Again, Maybe Not: Options
170(1)
Risk management
171(1)
Revenue generation
171(1)
Valuation
172(1)
Customizing the Contract with Forwards
173(2)
Risk management
173(1)
Revenue generation
174(1)
Valuation
174(1)
Adding Some Standardization to the Contract with Futures
175(2)
Risk management
175(1)
Revenue generation
176(1)
Valuation
176(1)
Exchanging This for That and Maybe This Again: Swaps
177(4)
Risk management
177(1)
Revenue generation
178(1)
Valuation
179(2)
Part IV A Wonderland of Risk Management
181(54)
Chapter 14 Managing the Risky Business of Corporate Finances
183(10)
Understanding that Risk Is Unavoidable
183(1)
Considering Interest Rate Risk and Inflation Risk
184(1)
Minimizing Market Risk
185(1)
Evaluating the Risk of Extending Credit
186(1)
Understanding Off-Balance-Sheet Risk
187(1)
Factoring in Foreign Exchange Risk
188(2)
Transaction risk
188(1)
Translation risk
189(1)
Other foreign exchange risk
190(1)
Identifying Operating Risk
191(1)
Looking at Liquidity Risk
192(1)
Chapter 15 Through the Looking Glass of Modern Portfolio Theory
193(18)
Delving into Portfolio Basics
194(2)
Surveying portfolio management strategies
194(1)
Looking at modern portfolio theory
195(1)
Understanding passive versus active management
195(1)
Hypothesizing an Efficient Market
196(1)
Risking Returns
197(10)
Looking at the trade-off between risk and return
198(1)
Diversifying to maximize returns and minimize risk
199(1)
Considering risk aversion
200(3)
Measuring risk
203(4)
Optimizing Portfolio Risk
207(4)
Chapter 16 Financially Engineering Yourself Deeper Down the Rabbit Hole
211(16)
Creating New Tools through Financial Engineering
212(1)
Making Securities Out of Just about Anything
212(2)
You can securitize everything
213(1)
Slicing securities into tranches
214(1)
Looking at Hybrid Finances
214(3)
The mixed-interest class of hybrids
215(1)
Single asset class hybrids
216(1)
Indexed-back CDs
216(1)
Bundling Assets
217(2)
Pass-through certificates
217(1)
Multi-asset bundles
218(1)
Unbundling
218(1)
Appealing to a Large Market with Exotic Finances
219(2)
Options
220(1)
Swaps contracts
220(1)
Loans
220(1)
Engineering Finances
221(2)
Moving into Computational Finance
223(4)
Changing the face of trading
224(1)
Offering online banking
225(1)
Looking at logic programming
225(2)
Chapter 17 Assessing Capital Structure Is WACC
227(8)
Making More Money than You Borrow
227(1)
Calculating the Cost of Capital
228(5)
Measuring cost of capital the WACC way
228(1)
Factoring in the cost of debt
229(1)
Looking at the cost of equity
230(1)
Dividend policy
230(3)
Choosing the Proper Capital Structure
233(2)
Part V Financial Management
235(54)
Chapter 18 Assessing Financial Performance
237(20)
Analyzing Financial Success
237(1)
Using Common-Size Comparisons
238(5)
Vertical common-size comparisons
239(1)
Horizontal common-size comparisons
240(1)
Cross comparisons
241(2)
Performing Comparatives
243(4)
Over time
243(2)
Against industry
245(2)
Determining the Quality of Earnings
247(4)
Accounting concerns
247(3)
Sources of cash flows
250(1)
Assessing Investment Performance
251(6)
Conventional evaluations
252(2)
Portfolio manager evaluations
254(3)
Chapter 19 Forecasting Finances Is Way Easier than the Weather
257(14)
Seeing with Eyes Analytical
257(7)
Collecting data
258(1)
Finding an average
259(1)
Distribution
260(2)
Probability
262(2)
Viewing the Past as New
264(4)
Finding trends and patterns
264(1)
Looking at regression
265(3)
Seeing the Future Unclouded: Forecasting
268(3)
Using statistics and probability
268(2)
Reference class forecasting
270(1)
Evaluating forecast performance
270(1)
Chapter 20 The 411 on M&A
271(18)
Getting the Real Scoop on M&A
272(1)
Differentiating Between the M and the A
273(5)
Mergers
273(2)
Acquisitions
275(1)
Buyouts
276(1)
Other forms of integration/cooperation
277(1)
Recognizing a Divestiture
278(1)
Identifying Motives for M&A
279(5)
Diversification
279(1)
Geographic expansion
280(1)
Economies of scale
280(1)
Economies of scope
281(1)
Vertical integration
281(1)
Horizontal integration
282(1)
Conglomerate integration
282(1)
Elimination of competitors
283(1)
Manager compensation
283(1)
Synergistic sperations
283(1)
Measuring What a Business is Worth to You
284(3)
Financing M&A
287(2)
Part VI The Part of Tens
289(28)
Chapter 21 Ten Things You Need to Know about International Finance
291(14)
There's No Such Thing as a Trade Imbalance
291(2)
Purchasing Power Isn't the Same Thing as Exchange Rate
293(1)
Eurobonds Aren't Necessarily from Europe
294(1)
Interest Rates and Exchange Rates Have a Muddled Relationship
295(1)
Spot Rate Isn't the Only Type of Currency Transaction
296(1)
Diversification Can't Completely Eliminate Risk Exposure
297(1)
Cross-Listing Allows Companies to Tap the World's Resources
298(2)
Outsourcing Is a Taxing Issue
300(1)
Politics Complicate Your Life
301(2)
Cultural Understanding Is Vital
303(2)
Chapter 22 Ten Things You Need to Understand about Behavioral Finance
305(12)
Making Financial Decisions Is Rarely Entirely Rational
306(1)
Making Sound Financial Decisions Involves Identifying Logical Fallacies
306(2)
Getting Emotional about Financial Decisions Can Leave You Crying
308(1)
Financial Stampeding Can Get You Trampled
308(1)
Letting Relationships Influence Finances Can Be Ruinous
309(1)
Satisficing Can Optimize Your Time and Energy
310(1)
Prospect Theory Explains Life in the Improbable
311(1)
People Are Subject to Behavioral Biases
312(1)
Analyzing and Presenting Information Can Be an Erroneous Process
313(2)
Measuring Irrationality in Finance Is Rational Behavioral Finance
315(2)
Index 317
Michael Taillard, PhD, MBA, owns and operates OPII Schools, an award-winning national private school and tutoring company designed as a philanthropic experiment in macroeconomic cash flows as a form of urban renewal.