Corporate Social Responsibility, Social Justice and the Global Food Supply Chain: Towards an Ethical Food Policy for Sustainable Supermarkets [Kõva köide]

(London School of Commerce, UK), (De Montfort University, UK)
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The modern food system has become hyper-efficient at producing large quantities of cheap food. Food chains, from farmer to consumer, have become increasingly dominated by supermarket oligopolies in both developing and developed countries. The economic power these supermarkets have derived from globalisation and economies of scale has been relentlessly focussed both upwards and downwards along the food chain, as well as sideways towards agencies of national and local governance. Consumers may enjoy cheaper meals but the food system is neither healthy nor sustainable. Obesity is already high in many countries and rising in the developing world, and global food chains remain hostage to many environmental threats, ranging from depletion of non-renewable resources such as water and oil to issues of pollution and loss of biodiversity. Utilising the framework of the Quadruple Bottom Line, and by gathering empirical evidence from a range of organisations – including governmental agencies, NGOs and charities, trade unions, retailers and retailing associations – Future Food Philosophies will identify where gaps in CSR initiatives exist and whether these lacunae could best be filled by ‘soft law’ (CSR) or ‘hard law’ (legislation). Future Food Philosophies will initially provide an overview of the extent to which supermarkets have become the most powerful players in the global food chain, and to what degree their CSR rhetoric attempts to address social and environmental issues arising from their operations in the developing and developed world. It will then elucidate a set of ethical theories and philosophies of CSR and explore the relationship between CSR and legislation, between soft and hard law; examining questions such as ‘why should supermarkets be socially-responsible?’ The authors will then examine empirical evidence as to what CSR initiatives exist now, how effective are they, and what further CSR programmes or even regulatory innovations would be required for a sustainable food system. Future Food Philosophies engages with a variety of disciplines, including, law, economics, management, marketing, retailing, politics, sociology, psychology, diet and nutrition, consumer behaviour, environmental studies and geography. It will be of interest to both practitioners and academics, including postgraduate students, social scientists and policy-makers.
List of Figures and Tables
viii
Introduction: Why Do Companies Exist? 1(5)
1 Feasting Cavemen and Responsible Giants
6(29)
1.1 The Eternal Modern Feast of Supermarkets
6(1)
1.2 The Growth of the Supermarkets
6(5)
1.3 Food Hedonism
11(1)
1.4 The Growing Obesity Epidemic
12(3)
1.5 The Multiple Dimensions of Economies of Scale in Supermarkets
15(5)
1.6 What Is CSR?
20(3)
1.7 `Provisions' as a Fourth Bottom Line: Why We Need Enhanced Supermarket CSR?
23(1)
1.8 Is Anything Wrong With Supermarket Corporate Social Responsibility?
24(4)
1.9 The Need for More Accountable, Comparable and Long-Term CSR
28(5)
1.10 The Need for Other Actors in the Realm of Supermarket Corporate Social Responsibility
33(2)
2 Food Justice as Social Justice: Towards a New Regulatory Framework in Support of a Basic Human Right to Healthy Food
35(27)
2.1 The Need for Regulatory Reform to Address Food Injustice
35(1)
2.2 Hungry for Justice: The Right to Nutritional Food and a Healthy Diet
36(3)
2.3 Social Stratification, Poverty and the Unequal Burden of Family Health and Nutrition
39(2)
2.4 A Rawlsian Approach to Alleviating Food Poverty as a Fundamental Principle of Social Justice
41(2)
2.5 The Reciprocal Influence of Egalitarian Institutions as a Basic Requirement of Social justice
43(3)
2.6 Between Theory and Reality: From Moral Law to Soft Law Solutions
46(4)
2.7 The Potential and Limits of Corporate Social Responsibility
50(2)
2.8 Beyond CSR, Soft Law and Traditional Regulatory Models
52(3)
2.9 `Proximity' via Levinas and the Law of Tort: Social Responsibility Begins in the Neighbourhood
55(4)
2.10 Can There Ever Be a Human Right to Healthy Food?
59(3)
3 Food Retailing, Society and the Economy
62(26)
3.1 From Laissez-Faire to Planning Regulations
62(1)
3.2 Behemoths Versus Boroughs
63(3)
3.3 Supermarket Land Banks
66(3)
3.4 Other Supermarket Planning Issues
69(3)
3.5 Respect for Other Nations' Laws and Culture
72(2)
3.6 Supermarkets and Competition With Other Retailers
74(5)
3.7 Supermarket Competition With Retailers in the Developing World
79(2)
3.8 Supermarkets and Job Creation
81(3)
3.9 Supermarket Pay Levels
84(4)
4 Food Retailing and the Environment
88(30)
4.1 Energy Use in the Food Chain
88(2)
4.2 Food Miles
90(3)
4.3 Water Usage
93(1)
4.4 Sustainability of the Food Chain
94(1)
4.5 Sustainability of Fishing
95(2)
4.6 Sustainability of the Rainforest
97(2)
4.7 Plastics Pollution
99(5)
4.8 Binning the Plastic
104(5)
4.9 Food Waste
109(9)
5 Food Retailing and Supermarket Suppliers
118(27)
5.1 Supermarket Monopsonies and Farm Prices
118(1)
5.2 The Price of Milk
119(5)
5.3 Other Supermarket Food Prices
124(3)
5.4 Supermarket Clothing Prices
127(1)
5.5 Supermarket Payments to Suppliers
128(5)
5.6 The Pressures on Rural Society
133(5)
5.7 Animal Welfare
138(2)
5.8 Food Labelling
140(5)
6 Food Retailing, Community and Consumers
145(21)
6.1 Assistance for Customers
145(3)
6.2 Local Charity Donations
148(1)
6.3 Food Banks
149(1)
6.4 Tesco Computers for Schools
150(1)
6.5 Other Supermarket Charitable Donations
151(2)
6.6 Supermarket Customer Data
153(5)
6.7 Effort Made by Supermarkets to Ensure the Food from Food Processors Is Healthier
158(1)
6.8 Marketing to Children
159(4)
6.9 Supermarket Food Labelling
163(3)
7 Other Food Suppliers and Food Promoters
166(10)
7.1 Schools, Prisons and the Military
166(3)
7.2 Hospitals and Care Homes
169(2)
7.3 Television and Other Advertising
171(3)
7.4 Taxation
174(2)
8 Supermarket CSR Initiatives Now and Change for Future Health and Sustainability
176(7)
8.1 A Classification of Current Supermarket CSR Initiatives
176(2)
8.2 The Feel-Good Factor of CSR
178(1)
8.3 Refocussing CSR Towards Health and Sustainability
179(1)
8.4 Keeping the Supermarkets Intact, Candid, Responsible and Responsive
180(3)
Bibliography 183(12)
Index 195
Hillary J. Shaw is Visiting Professor in the Department of Politics and Public Policy at De Montfort University, Leicester, UK. His research spans sustainable economic development, corporate social responsibility, and the integration of global and local food systems. He is the author of many journal articles, essays, reviews, reports and books, including The Consuming Geographies of Food: Diet, Food Deserts and Obesity (Routledge, 2014). Julia J.A. Shaw is Professor of Law and Social Justice in the School of Law at De Montfort University, Leicester, UK. Her research is interdisciplinary, and publications include Jurisprudence (3rd edition, Pearson 2018) and Law and the Passions: A Discrete History (Routledge, 2019).

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