Creating Languages in Central Europe During the Last Millennium [Kõva köide]

  • Formaat: Hardback, 153 pages, kõrgus x laius x paksus: 216x140x13 mm, kaal: 364 g, XIV, 153 p., 1 Hardback
  • Ilmumisaeg: 22-Dec-2014
  • Kirjastus: Palgrave Pivot
  • ISBN-10: 1137507837
  • ISBN-13: 9781137507839
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  • Formaat: Hardback, 153 pages, kõrgus x laius x paksus: 216x140x13 mm, kaal: 364 g, XIV, 153 p., 1 Hardback
  • Ilmumisaeg: 22-Dec-2014
  • Kirjastus: Palgrave Pivot
  • ISBN-10: 1137507837
  • ISBN-13: 9781137507839
Teised raamatud teemal:
Languages are formed into discrete entities, as we know them nowadays, by the technology of writing in the service of power centers, usually state capitals. All the choices made on the way – planned or not – amount to standardization which intensifies as the literate percentage of population increases. Long-lasting extant states and religions decidedly shaped the constellation of written languages across Central Europe. Having emerged in the 10th and 11th centuries, this constellation was dramatically remade during the religious wars and, from the 15th to 17th centuries, by the invention and spread of printing, marking a growing correlation between vernaculars and written languages. After 1918, Central Europe's multiethnic empires were replaced by nation-states, giving rise to the political principle of ethnolinguistic nationalism which holds that the nation-state is legitimate only if it is monolingual and monoscriptural and does not share its official language with another polity. This book provides an overview detailed history and linguistic analysis of how the many languages of Central Europe have developed from the 10th century to the present day, when cyberspace changes the rules of the game.

Arvustused

"It is worth noting that this is not a book written for linguists only. Kamusella relates the mechanics of language creation to major developments in culture, religion and statehood. He diligently explains all terms and concepts introduced in the book." (Malgorzata Szajbel-keck, pol-int.org, March, 2016) "Kamusella's latest work supplies the reader with an impressive array of historical information on a great number of lects and is highly ambitious in its aim to cover the linguistic developments in Central Europe during the last millennium. ... this book makes a valuable contribution to an important field of study. ... very useful reading for, say, specialists in one Central European lect who wish to learn more about the broader Central European picture." (Gesine Argent, Journal of Historical Sociolinguistics, Vol. 2 (1), 2016)

Preface ix
Acknowledgments xiv
Introduction: (Central) Europe and the World 1(6)
1 Preliminaries
7(19)
Language or languages?
8(2)
The dichotomy of `a language' (Einzelsprache) and dialect
10(4)
Writing and ideology
14(1)
Standard languages and nations
15(11)
2 Setting the Stage in Europe
26(21)
Holy Latin in the West
27(3)
Vernaculars into languages in the West
30(5)
Holy languages in the East
35(12)
3 The Question of the Middle
47(16)
Plurality or homogeneity?
48(5)
What is in the name?
53(2)
Politics of script
55(3)
E unum pluribus
58(5)
4 From Nationalism to the Internet
63(39)
Ethnolinguistic nationalism: the beginnings
65(8)
Central Europe of nation-states
73(5)
The internet changes the rules of the game
78(9)
European ethnolinguistic commonality?
87(9)
Conclusion
96(6)
E-Illustrations 102(12)
Bibliography 114(34)
Index 148
Tomasz Kamusella is a Reader in the Institute of Transnational and Spatial History at the University of St Andrews, UK. He researches language politics in a comparative and interdisciplinary manner. His other interest is the rise and spread of ethnolinguistic nationalism as the primary ideology of nation-formation and state-building in Central Europe.