Dancing Lares and the Serpent in the Garden: Religion at the Roman Street Corner [Kõva köide]

  • Formaat: Hardback, 416 pages, kõrgus x laius: 254x178 mm, 24 color illus. 46 halftones. 26 line illus.
  • Ilmumisaeg: 01-Sep-2017
  • Kirjastus: Princeton University Press
  • ISBN-10: 0691175004
  • ISBN-13: 9780691175003
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  • Formaat: Hardback, 416 pages, kõrgus x laius: 254x178 mm, 24 color illus. 46 halftones. 26 line illus.
  • Ilmumisaeg: 01-Sep-2017
  • Kirjastus: Princeton University Press
  • ISBN-10: 0691175004
  • ISBN-13: 9780691175003

The most pervasive gods in ancient Rome had no traditional mythology attached to them, nor was their worship organized by elites. Throughout the Roman world, neighborhood street corners, farm boundaries, and household hearths featured small shrines to the beloved lares, a pair of cheerful little dancing gods. These shrines were maintained primarily by ordinary Romans, and often by slaves and freedmen, for whom the lares cult provided a unique public leadership role. In this comprehensive and richly illustrated book, the first to focus on the lares, Harriet Flower offers a strikingly original account of these gods and a new way of understanding the lived experience of everyday Roman religion.

Weaving together a wide range of evidence, Flower sets forth a new interpretation of the much-disputed nature of the lares. She makes the case that they are not spirits of the dead, as many have argued, but rather benevolent protectors—gods of place, especially the household and the neighborhood, and of travel. She examines the rituals honoring the lares, their cult sites, and their iconography, as well as the meaning of the snakes often depicted alongside lares in paintings of gardens. She also looks at Compitalia, a popular midwinter neighborhood festival in honor of the lares, and describes how its politics played a key role in Rome’s increasing violence in the 60s and 50s BC, as well as in the efforts of Augustus to reach out to ordinary people living in the city’s local neighborhoods.

A reconsideration of seemingly humble gods that were central to the religious world of the Romans, this is also the first major account of the full range of lares worship in the homes, neighborhoods, and temples of ancient Rome.

Preface ixI Lar(es) / Genius and Juno / Snake(s) 1i Varro Hesitates . . . 6ii Origins and Early Evidence 18iii A Lar Introduces Himself 31iv Single Lar, Twin Lares 36v Monthly Rituals at the Hearth 40vi Kitchen Gods 46vii A Genius Pours a Libation 53viii Serpent(s) in a Garden 63ix A Painted Landscape of Local Gods 71II Shrines for Lares in Rome 76x The Three Asses of the Bride 78xi Temple: Aedes 86xii Sanctuary: Ara / Fanum / Sacellum / Pomerium 104xiii Crossroads Shrine: Compitum 116xiv Lots of Small Shrines: Compita and Sacella 137xv Pompeii: A Case Study 145xvi Sacred Spaces and Lares Who Live in Them 157III Celebrating Lares 160xvii Compitalia: Who Is My Neighbor? 162xviii Delos: A Case Study 175xix Local Networks: Vicatim 192xx Officers and Associations: (Vico)magistri, Ministri, Collegia 206xxi Magistri and Ministri in Italy 226xxii Politics at Compitalia 234xxiii Religion and Politics at the Crossroads 250IV Augustus and Lares Augusti 255xxiv Augustus and Rome before 7 BC 258xxv The Reform of 7 BC 271xxvi Lares Augusti 284xxvii Genius Augusti? 299xxviii Who Gets the Bull? 311xxix Ara Pacis Augustae: Who Gets the Pig? 320xxx August Gods in the Vici 329xxxi The "New Age" of Augustus: Time and History 336xxxii Augustus and Lares Augusti 346Epilogue 348Appendix 1 References to Lares by Roman Authors: A List 353Appendix 2 Lares in the Calendar at Rome 357Appendix 3 Augustan Time Patterns 359Bibliography 361Index 387Image Credits 391
Harriet I. Flower is professor of classics at Princeton University. She is the author of Roman Republics (Princeton), The Art of Forgetting: Disgrace and Oblivion in Roman Political Culture, and Ancestor Masks and Aristocratic Power in Roman Culture. She is also the editor of The Cambridge Companion to the Roman Republic.

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