Film and Video Editing Theory: How Editing Creates Meaning [Pehme köide]

(University of North Carolina at Greensboro, USA)
  • Formaat: Paperback / softback, 328 pages, kõrgus x laius: 254x178 mm, kaal: 612 g, 205 Halftones, black and white; 205 Illustrations, black and white
  • Ilmumisaeg: 04-Apr-2018
  • Kirjastus: Routledge
  • ISBN-10: 113820207X
  • ISBN-13: 9781138202078
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  • Formaat: Paperback / softback, 328 pages, kõrgus x laius: 254x178 mm, kaal: 612 g, 205 Halftones, black and white; 205 Illustrations, black and white
  • Ilmumisaeg: 04-Apr-2018
  • Kirjastus: Routledge
  • ISBN-10: 113820207X
  • ISBN-13: 9781138202078

A Primer on Film and Video Editing Theory offers an accessible, introductory guide to the issues underlying how editing creates meaning. In this book, Michael Frierson synthesizes the theories of the most prominent film editors and scholars, from Herbert Zettl and Noel Burch to the work of landmark Hollywood editors like Walter Murch and Edward Dmytryk. In so doing, he maps out a set of craft principles for readers, whether one is debating if a flashback reveals too much, if a certain cut clarifies or obscures the space of a scene, or if a shot needs to be trimmed. The book is grounded in the unity of theory and practice, looking beyond technical proficiency in a specific software to explain to readers how and why certain cuts work or don’t work. A companion website offers further resources, including video clips that readers can download and experiment with to illustrate specific editing concepts.

Arvustused

"The book includes photographs of the scenes analyzed, and best of all, a link to a website where the reader can actually view the scenes." -- Conrad J. Obregon, Vine Voice

List of Figures
x
Preface xv
Acknowledgments xviii
1 Herbert Zettl, Approaches to Building Screen Space and Vectors
1(44)
Approaches to Building Screen Space
1(9)
Graphic Vectors and Index Vectors: Continuity and Discontinuity
10(9)
180° Rule: Continuity at the Production Stage
19(5)
Motion Vectors: Continuing, Converging
24(4)
A Special Case: Continuity with Z-axis Index Vectors and Z-axis Motion Vectors
28(7)
Broader Views for Building Screen Space
35(1)
Ways of Looking: Looking at, Looking into, Creating an Event
35(3)
Inductive Versus Deductive Approaches to Building Screen Space
38(3)
Deductive Versus Inductive Sequencing and Screen Resolution
41(1)
Conclusion
42(3)
2 Noel Burch, PMR Versus IMR and Continuity Editing in a 5 × 3 Matrix
45(41)
IMR Versus PMR
46(2)
Edwin S. Porter and the PMR
48(9)
Decoupage and Burch's Matrix
57(3)
The Temporal Axis: Temporal Relations between Outgoing Shot A and Incoming Shot B
60(1)
Temporal Continuity
60(1)
Temporal Reversal
60(4)
Temporal Ellipsis
64(6)
The Flashforward: A Relatively Rare Occurrence
70(4)
The Spatial Axis: Spatial Relations between Outgoing Shot A and Incoming Shot B
74(3)
Applying Burch's Matrix to Welles and Scorsese
77(5)
Conclusion
82(4)
3 Hollywood Theorists: Edward Dmytryk and Walter Murch
86(13)
Edward Dmytryk
86(1)
Six Rules for The Ideal Cut
87(6)
Walter Murch: Six Criteria for the Ideal Cut
93(1)
Murch and Blink Theory
94(2)
Conclusion: The Tradition of Dymtryk and Murch
96(3)
4 David Bordwell, the Narrative Functions of Continuity Editing and Intensified Continuity
99(47)
Neoformalism Versus Interpretation: Building on Russian Formalism
100(1)
Story Construction
101(2)
Editing and Canonic Hollywood Narration
103(3)
The Temporal Order of Narrative Events
106(1)
Case A Simultaneous Events, Simultaneous Presentation
106(7)
Case B Successive Events, Simultaneous Presentation
113(1)
Case C Simultaneous Events, Successive Presentation
114(4)
Case D Successive Events, Successive Presentation
118(4)
Narrative Functions of Manipulating Temporal Order
122(1)
The Frequency of Narrative Events
122(2)
The Duration of Narrative Events
124(2)
Equivalence: FD = SYD = SCD
126(2)
Reduction: Ellipsis FD > SYD and SYD = SCD
128(1)
Reduction: Compression (Fast Motion) FD = SYD and both FD and SYD > SCD
129(2)
Expansion: Insertion FD < SYD and SYD = SCD
131(2)
Expansion: Dilation (Slow motion) FD = SYD and both SYD and FD < SCD
133(1)
Using Slow Motion for Violence
134(4)
Bordwell on Intensified Continuity
138(3)
Conclusion
141(5)
5 Eisenstein and Montage
146(60)
Eisenstein's Contemporaries
147(1)
Dziga Vertov (1896--1954)
148(1)
Lev Kuleshov (1899--1970)
148(1)
Vsevolod I. Pudovkin (1893--1953)
149(2)
Pudovkin Versus Eisenstein
151(4)
What is "Montage"?
155(1)
Six Usages of the Word "Montage"
155(8)
Eisenstein's Early Theorizing: The Attraction and Seizing the Spectator
163(26)
Eisenstein's Later Work: Making Films and Theorizing in the Age of Stalin
189(2)
Eisenstein's Later Theorizing and Vertical Montage
191(8)
Conclusion
199(7)
6 Realism and Andre Bazin
206(32)
Early Life, Philosophical Influences and Cine Clubs
207(2)
Theorizing Film
209(3)
Bazin on Rossellini and Paisan
212(3)
Bazin on De Sica and Bicycle Thieves
215(7)
Bazin on Welles and Citizen Kane
222(6)
Bazin on Welles and The Magnificent Ambersons
228(2)
Bazin on Renoir
230(3)
Conclusion
233(5)
7 Dream and Ritual: Andrei Tarkovsky and Maya Deren
238(22)
Andrei Tarkovsky
239(1)
Tarkovsky and Time Pressure
240(9)
Maya Deren
249(2)
Maya Deren and Meshes of the Afternoon
251(6)
Conclusion
257(3)
8 Rhythmic and Graphic Editing
260(57)
Rhythmic Relations in Editing
261(3)
Music: Internal or External Rhythm?
264(1)
External Rhythm: Cutting Rhythm and the Decrease in Average Shot Length
264(5)
Factors that Control Internal Rhythm
269(1)
Internal Rhythm: Tempo of the Action
270(1)
Internal Rhythm: Pattern of Movement and Lens Usage
271(5)
Internal Rhythm: Camera Placement
276(4)
Internal Rhythm: Scope of the Shot
280(1)
Internal Rhythm: Camera Movement
281(6)
Internal Rhythm: Color
287(3)
Internal Rhythm: Repeated Forms
290(2)
External Rhythm: Modification by Transitions
292(1)
External Rhythm: Dissolves
293(3)
External Rhythm: Fades
296(2)
External Rhythm: Wipe
298(4)
External Rhythm: The Iris
302(2)
Graphic Relations in Editing
304(7)
Conclusion
311(6)
Glossary 317(6)
Index 323
Michael Frierson is a Professor in Media Studies at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. He is the author of Clay Animation: American Highlights 1908 to the Present (1994), which won the McLaren-Lambart Award from the National Film Board of Canada for the Best Scholarly Book on Animation for 1995. He teaches film theory, film/video production and editing, and has produced, shot and edited feature documentaries, as well as short films for Nickelodeon, Children's Television Workshop, MSN Video, and AT&T Blue Room.

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