Introduction to Emergency Management 2nd New edition [Kõva köide]

(Ohio University, Chillicothe, USA), (University of North Texas, Denton, USA), (Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, USA)
  • Formaat: Hardback, 442 pages, kõrgus x laius x paksus: 254x178x30 mm, kaal: 998 g, 20 Line drawings, black and white; 41 Halftones, black and white; 1 Tables, black and white
  • Ilmumisaeg: 21-Nov-2016
  • Kirjastus: Apple Academic Press Inc.
  • ISBN-10: 148224506X
  • ISBN-13: 9781482245066
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  • * soodushind kehtib ainult laos olevatele toodetele
  • Formaat: Hardback, 442 pages, kõrgus x laius x paksus: 254x178x30 mm, kaal: 998 g, 20 Line drawings, black and white; 41 Halftones, black and white; 1 Tables, black and white
  • Ilmumisaeg: 21-Nov-2016
  • Kirjastus: Apple Academic Press Inc.
  • ISBN-10: 148224506X
  • ISBN-13: 9781482245066
Teised raamatud teemal:
Emergency management university programs have experienced dramatic and exponential growth over the last twelve years. This new, fully updated edition introduces majors and minors to the field and provides content accessible to those students taking introductory emergency management courses. The book's student-centered focus looks at the regional, state, and local level response, as well as some of the often misunderstood or overlooked social aspects of disasters. Real-world cases are described throughout including considerations of international emergency management and disasters alongside features from former students now working as professionals in the field of emergency management.
Preface xvii
Authors xxi
Chapter 1 History and Current Status of Emergency Management
1(32)
1.1 Introduction
2(7)
1.2 The Evolution of Emergency Management in the United States
9(15)
1.2.1 Civil Defense
10(1)
1.2.2 Managing Natural and Technological Disasters in the United States
11(1)
1.2.3 The Development of the U.S. FEMA
12(1)
1.2.3.1 Creation of FEMA
12(2)
1.2.3.2 FEMA as a Stand-Alone Agency
14(3)
1.2.3.3 FEMA, Terrorism, and the DHS
17(7)
1.3 Other Federal Organizations
24(3)
1.3.1 Native American Tribes
25(1)
1.3.2 Department of Energy
26(1)
1.3.3 The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
26(1)
1.4 Research Centers
27(6)
Summary
28(1)
Discussion Questions
29(1)
Resources
29(1)
References and Recommended Readings
30(3)
Chapter 2 Working in Emergency Management
33(32)
2.1 Introduction
34(1)
2.2 The Profession of Emergency Management
35(1)
2.3 Working in the Profession of Emergency Management
36(12)
2.3.1 Public Sector Emergency Management in the United States
40(3)
2.3.2 Private Sector Emergency Management
43(1)
2.3.3 Voluntary Sector Emergency Management
44(1)
2.3.4 International Emergency Management and Humanitarian Aid
45(3)
2.4 The Seasonal Life of the Emergency Manager
48(17)
2.4.1 Tornadoes
48(2)
2.4.2 Hurricanes
50(1)
2.4.3 Earthquakes
50(1)
2.4.4 Floods
51(1)
2.4.5 Wildfires
51(1)
2.4.6 Volcanoes
52(1)
2.4.7 Chemical Hazards
52(1)
2.4.8 Biological Hazards
52(1)
2.4.9 Radiological and Nuclear Hazards
53(3)
2.4.10 Terrorism
56(1)
2.4.11 Natechs
57(1)
2.4.12 Computer Failures and Cyberterrorism
57(1)
2.4.13 Space Weather
58(1)
Summary
58(1)
Discussion Questions
59(1)
Resources
60(1)
References and Recommended Readings
60(5)
Chapter 3 Key Concepts, Definitions, and Perspectives
65(40)
3.1 Introduction
66(1)
3.2 Denning Disaster
67(4)
3.2.1 A Continuum of Disaster
68(1)
3.2.1.1 Emergency
68(1)
3.2.1.2 Disaster
69(1)
3.2.1.3 Catastrophe
69(2)
3.3 The Politics of Disasters
71(3)
3.3.1 Slow-versus Fast-Moving Views of Disaster
73(1)
3.4 The National Governor's Association Report in the United States
74(5)
3.4.1 The Disaster Life Cycle
75(2)
3.4.2 The Expansion of Emergency Management
77(1)
3.4.3 All Hazards Approach
78(1)
3.5 The Body of Knowledge
79(3)
3.5.1 The Hazard Tradition
79(1)
3.5.2 The Disaster Tradition
80(1)
3.5.3 Risk and Risk Perception Traditions
81(1)
3.6 Understanding Disasters
82(14)
3.6.1 Emergent Norm Theory
88(1)
3.6.2 Loosely Coupled Systems
89(2)
3.6.3 Systems Theory
91(2)
3.6.4 Sociopolitical Ecology Theory
93(1)
3.6.5 Vulnerability Theory
94(2)
3.7 Embracing a Multidisciplinary Approach
96(1)
3.8 The View from Emergency Management Higher Education
97(8)
Summary
99(1)
Discussion Questions
99(1)
Resources
100(1)
References and Recommended Readings
101(4)
Chapter 4 Research Methods and the Practice of Emergency Management
105(34)
4.1 Introduction
106(6)
4.1.1 The Benefits of Understanding Research
106(1)
4.1.2 Sources of Knowledge for Emergency Managers
107(1)
4.1.2.1 Education-Based Knowledge
107(1)
4.1.2.2 Experience-Based Knowledge
107(1)
4.1.2.3 Research-Based Knowledge
108(4)
4.2 Brief History of Disaster Research
112(6)
4.2.1 Early Disaster Studies
112(1)
4.2.2 Research Centers in the United States
113(3)
4.2.3 International Research
116(2)
4.3 Disaster Research as a Multidisciplinary Field
118(2)
4.4 Types of Research
120(4)
4.4.1 Basic and Applied Research
120(1)
4.4.2 Primary and Secondary Research
121(1)
4.4.3 Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Research
121(1)
4.4.4 Individual and Aggregate Research
122(1)
4.4.5 Quantitative and Qualitative Research
123(1)
4.5 Methods of Data Collection
124(7)
4.5.1 Surveys
124(1)
4.5.2 Interviews
125(2)
4.5.3 Observations
127(1)
4.5.4 Archives
128(2)
4.5.5 Spatial Tools
130(1)
4.6 Ethics and Challenges of Disaster Research
131(8)
4.6.1 Research Ethics
131(1)
4.6.2 Research Challenges
132(2)
Summary
134(1)
Discussion Questions
134(1)
Resources
135(1)
References and Recommended Readings
135(4)
Chapter 5 Preparedness
139(36)
5.1 Introduction
140(11)
5.1.1 Defining Preparedness
140(4)
5.1.2 Types and Levels of Preparedness Activities
144(1)
5.1.2.1 Individuals and Households
145(3)
5.1.2.2 Organizations
148(2)
5.1.2.3 Communities
150(1)
5.2 Factors Influencing Levels of Preparedness
151(12)
5.2.1 Previous Disaster Experience
151(1)
5.2.2 Risk Perception
152(1)
5.2.3 Populations at Risk
153(1)
5.2.3.1 Race and Ethnicity
153(2)
5.2.3.2 Senior Citizens
155(2)
5.2.3.3 People with Disabilities
157(1)
5.2.3.4 Children
158(1)
5.2.3.5 Gender
159(1)
5.2.3.6 Language
160(1)
5.2.3.7 Pre-Disaster Homeless
161(1)
5.2.3.8 Pets
162(1)
5.3 Preparedness Initiatives at State, National, and International Levels
163(4)
5.3.1 Examples of State-Level Preparedness Initiatives
163(1)
5.3.2 Examples of National-Level Preparedness Initiatives
164(2)
5.3.3 Examples of International Preparedness Initiatives
166(1)
5.4 Working and Volunteering in Preparedness
167(8)
Summary
168(1)
Discussion Questions
168(1)
Resources
169(1)
References and Recommended Readings
169(6)
Chapter 6 Planning
175(36)
6.1 Introduction
176(1)
6.2 Planning as a Process
177(8)
6.3 Types of Planning
185(4)
6.3.1 Planning Across the Life Cycle of Emergency Management
186(1)
6.3.2 Business Continuity Planning
187(2)
6.4 Planning Guidance
189(15)
6.4.1 Personal and Household Level Planning
189(5)
6.4.2 Community-Based Planning
194(3)
6.4.3 State Planning Guidance in the United States
197(1)
6.4.4 National Planning Guidance
198(3)
6.4.5 Cross-National Guidance
201(3)
6.5 Working and Volunteering in Planning
204(7)
Summary
206(1)
Discussion Questions
206(1)
Resources
207(1)
References and Recommended Readings
208(3)
Chapter 7 Response
211(42)
7.1 Introduction
212(4)
7.1.1 Ignoring Other Phases of Disaster
215(1)
7.1.2 Envisioning Chaos
215(1)
7.1.3 Assuming Need for Command and Control
216(1)
7.2 Getting Started: Definitions and Activities
216(4)
7.2.1 Defining Response
217(1)
7.2.2 Typical Response Activities
217(3)
7.3 Disaster Warnings
220(10)
7.3.1 Warning Process
221(1)
7.3.2 Taking Protective Action
222(1)
7.3.2.1 Evacuation and Temporary Sheltering
222(3)
7.3.2.2 Factors Affecting Evacuation and Public Shelter Usage
225(2)
7.3.3 Characteristics of Effective Disaster Warnings
227(3)
7.4 Disaster Response: Myths and Realities
230(9)
7.4.1 Myth-Based View of Disaster Response
230(3)
7.4.2 Research-Based View of Disaster Response
233(5)
7.4.2.1 Sources and Limitations of Community Resilience
238(1)
7.5 Disaster Response in an International Context
239(2)
7.6 Disaster Response and Principles of Effective Emergency Management
241(6)
7.6.1 Comprehensive Emergency Management
241(1)
7.6.2 Integrated Emergency Management
242(1)
7.6.3 Flexibility in Emergency Management
243(4)
7.7 Working and Volunteering in Response
247(6)
Summary
248(1)
Discussion Questions
248(1)
Resources
249(1)
References and Recommended Readings
249(4)
Chapter 8 Recovery
253(30)
8.1 Introduction
254(1)
8.2 Defining Recovery
254(2)
8.3 Recovery Challenges
256(9)
8.3.1 Pre-Disaster Recovery Planning
256(3)
8.3.2 Leveraging Human Resources for Recovery
259(6)
8.4 Facing the Challenges of Recovery
265(11)
8.4.1 Getting People Back Home
265(3)
8.4.2 Businesses
268(2)
8.4.3 Infrastructure and Lifelines
270(1)
8.4.4 Psychological Impacts
271(3)
8.4.5 Environmental Concerns
274(1)
8.4.6 Historic and Cultural Resources
275(1)
8.5 Working and Volunteering in the Field of Recovery
276(7)
Summary
277(1)
Discussion Questions
278(1)
Resources
279(1)
References and Recommended Readings
279(4)
Chapter 9 Mitigation
283(30)
9.1 Introduction
284(1)
9.2 Structural Mitigation
284(12)
9.2.1 Living with Hazards and the Built Environment
287(1)
9.2.2 Elevations
288(1)
9.2.3 Retrofit
289(1)
9.2.4 Safe Rooms
290(1)
9.2.5 Dams and Levees
291(1)
9.2.6 Building Resilience
292(2)
9.2.7 Advantages of Structural Mitigation
294(1)
9.2.8 Disadvantages of Structural Mitigation
295(1)
9.3 Nonstructural Mitigation
296(6)
9.3.1 Land Use Planning
296(1)
9.3.2 Building Codes and Enforcement
297(1)
9.3.3 Relocations
298(1)
9.3.4 Insurance
299(1)
9.3.5 Advantages of Nonstructural Mitigation
300(1)
9.3.6 Disadvantages of Nonstructural Mitigation
300(2)
9.4 Mitigation Planning
302(3)
9.4.1 Launching Mitigation Planning
302(1)
9.4.2 The Hazard Mitigation Planning Process
303(2)
9.5 Working or Volunteering in Mitigation
305(8)
Summary
307(1)
Discussion Questions
308(1)
Resources
308(1)
References and Recommended Readings
309(4)
Chapter 10 Public and Private Sectors
313(46)
10.1 Introduction
314(1)
10.2 The Public Sector
314(9)
10.2.1 Local Government
314(1)
10.2.1.1 Elected Officials and the Emergency Management Offices
315(1)
10.2.1.2 Local Departments
316(1)
10.2.2 State Government
316(1)
10.2.2.1 Role of the Governor
317(1)
10.2.2.2 Emergency Management and Homeland Security Offices
317(2)
10.2.3 Accrediting State and Local Governments
319(1)
10.2.4 Federal Government
320(1)
10.2.4.1 The Executive Branch
320(2)
10.2.4.2 Congress
322(1)
10.3 The Private Sector
323(15)
10.3.1 The Importance of the Private Sector
324(1)
10.3.2 The Impacts of Disasters on the Private Sector
325(1)
10.3.2.1 Direct Impacts
325(1)
10.3.2.2 Indirect Impacts
326(1)
10.3.2.3 Remote Impacts
327(1)
10.3.3 The Private Sector and the Life Cycle of Emergency Management
328(1)
10.3.3.1 Preparedness
329(3)
10.3.3.2 Response
332(1)
10.3.3.3 Recovery
333(1)
10.3.3.4 Mitigation
334(4)
10.4 Public and Private Sector Relationships
338(8)
10.4.1 Developing Public and Private Sector Relationships
338(8)
10.5 Working and Volunteering in the Private Sector
346(13)
Summary
350(1)
Discussion Questions
351(1)
Resources
352(1)
References
353(6)
Chapter 11 International and Humanitarian Disaster Relief
359(30)
11.1 Introduction
360(3)
11.2 Best Practices for Working Internationally
363(10)
11.2.1 Cultural Understanding and Awareness
363(3)
11.2.2 Inappropriate Relief Efforts
366(1)
11.2.3 Appropriate Relief Efforts
366(4)
11.2.4 Empowering Locals
370(3)
11.3 Best Practices for Refugee Resettlement Services (Dr. Jenny Mincin)
373(5)
11.3.1 Employment
374(1)
11.3.2 Home-Country Language Proficiency
374(1)
11.3.3 Integration
375(1)
11.3.4 Health and Mental Health Services
375(1)
11.3.5 Utilizing the Strengths-Based Approach to Working with Refugees
376(2)
11.4 Disaster Risk Reduction
378(2)
11.5 Working and Volunteering in an International Setting
380(9)
Summary
381(1)
Discussion Questions
382(1)
Resources
383(1)
Co-Author Biography
383(1)
References and Recommended Readings
384(5)
Chapter 12 The Next Generation of Emergency Managers
389(32)
12.1 Introduction
390(1)
12.2 Reflecting Our Population
391(8)
12.2.1 Women
391(6)
12.2.2 Racial and Ethnic Minorities and Tribal Nations
397(1)
12.2.3 People with Disabilities
398(1)
12.2.4 LGBTQ Populations
398(1)
12.3 Becoming a Professional Emergency Manager
399(9)
12.3.1 Finding a Mentor
401(2)
12.3.2 Internships
403(1)
12.3.3 Fellowships and Scholarships
404(2)
12.3.4 Training
406(1)
12.3.5 Exercises and Drills
407(1)
12.3.6 Conferences, Workshops
407(1)
12.4 Pursing Your Degree and Beyond
408(6)
12.4.1 FEMA Higher Education Program
408(1)
12.4.2 Undergraduate Degree Programs
409(3)
12.4.3 Graduate Programs
412(2)
12.5 Where Will the Jobs Be?
414(1)
12.6 Commitment to an Ethical Practice of Emergency Management
414(7)
Summary
418(1)
Discussion Questions
418(1)
Resources
418(1)
References and Recommended Readings
419(2)
Appendices 421(10)
Index 431
Brenda Phillips, Ph.D., is the Associate Dean and Professor of Sociology at Ohio University in Chillicothe. She is the author of Disaster Recovery, Introduction to Emergency Management, Qualitative Disaster Research and Mennonite Disaster Service. She has co-edited Social Vulnerability to Disasters and Women and Disasters: from theory to practice. Dr. Phillips is the recipient of the Blanchard Award for excellence in emergency management education and the Myers Award for work on the effects of disasters on women. She was inducted into the International Women's Hall of Fame for Emergency Management and Homeland Security in 2013. She has been funded multiple times by the National Science Foundation with publications in multiple peer-reviewed journals. Dr. Phillips has been invited to teach, consult, or present in New Zealand, Australia, Germany, India, Costa Rica, Mexico, Canada, Sweden, and the People's Republic of China. She is a graduate of Bluffton University (Ohio) and The Ohio State University. Locally, Dr. Phillips is a member of the Ross County Local Emergency Planning Committee, the Ross County Safety Council Board of Directors, and the Chillicothe Rotary. She recently led efforts to re-establish the OUC Emergency Response Training Center for widespread and affordable local use by emergency responders. Dave Neal, Ph.D., is a sociologist serving as a professor with the Fire and emergency Management Program in the Department of Political Science at Oklahoma State University. He has studied a wide range of events (e.g., blizzards, tornadoes, floods, hurricanes, earthquakes, hazardous materials, tsunamis) throughout the United States, and also in Sweden and India. Such organizations as FEMA, NASA, the National Science Foundation, and the American Red Cross among others have funded his research. He taught his first class on disasters in 1979 at the University of Evansville. In 1989, he joined the Institute of Emergency Administration Planning at the University of North Texas, where he became the first full time Ph.D. faculty member with the first emergency management degree program and later served as its director. He has published academic articles on developing emergency management degree programs and using virtual teaching environments for teaching emergency management. He has also served as a consultant for universities starting undergraduate and graduate degrees in emergency management and fire administration. In 2015, he received the Blanchard Award for excellence in emergency management education. He has also served as a Red Cross disaster volunteer and as Chapter Chair of the Denton County Red Cross. He received his bachelor's and master's degrees from Bowling Green State University and his Ph.D. in sociology from The Ohio State University, where he also served as a research assistant with the Disaster Research Center. His current interests focus on crisis and disaster research in Sweden, and writing on the sociology of science of disaster research. Gary Webb, PhD, is a professor in the Emergency Administration and Planning (EADP) program at the University of North Texas. Previously he was a faculty member in the sociology department at Oklahoma State University, where he received the Regents Distinguished Teaching Award. He holds a PhD from the University of Delaware, where he worked at the Disaster Research Center, and he specializes in the study of organizational preparedness for and response to extreme events. His research has been supported by various agencies, including the U.S. National Science Foundation, and it has appeared in a variety of professional journals, including the International Journal of Mass Emergencies and Disasters, International Journal of Emergency Management, Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management, Natural Hazards Review, and Environmental Hazards. His research has also been featured in national media outlets, including the Los Angeles Times, Newsday, and Christian Science Monitor. He has been invited to teach or present his research to international audiences in Denmark, France, South Korea, The Netherlands, and Turkey.