Language, Society and Power: An Introduction 5th New edition [Pehme köide]

(Roehampton University, UK),
  • Formaat: Paperback / softback, 298 pages, kõrgus x laius: 246x174 mm, kaal: 544 g, 16 Line drawings, black and white; 16 Halftones, black and white; 26 Tables, black and white; 32 Illustrations, black and white
  • Ilmumisaeg: 01-Nov-2018
  • Kirjastus: Routledge
  • ISBN-10: 041578624X
  • ISBN-13: 9780415786249
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  • Formaat: Paperback / softback, 298 pages, kõrgus x laius: 246x174 mm, kaal: 544 g, 16 Line drawings, black and white; 16 Halftones, black and white; 26 Tables, black and white; 32 Illustrations, black and white
  • Ilmumisaeg: 01-Nov-2018
  • Kirjastus: Routledge
  • ISBN-10: 041578624X
  • ISBN-13: 9780415786249
Teised raamatud teemal:
Language, Society and Power is an accessible introduction to studying language in a variety of social contexts. This book examines the ways language functions, how it influences the way we view society and how it varies according to age, ethnicity, class and gender. It considers whether representations of people and their language matter, explores how identity is constructed and performed, and considers the creative potential of language in the media, politics and everyday talk.The fifth edition of this popular textbook features:? Updated chapters with new activities;? Examples that include material related to youth language, computer-mediated communication, texting and electronic communication;? New material on online mass media, fake news and Twitter as a form of political agency;? More discussion of social media, social networking, memes and mobile communication; ? An introduction to the concepts of translanguaging and superdiversity;? An expanded Gender chapter that questions binary gender identities;? A companion website which includes more video material to support learning as students make their way through the book.Language, Society and Power assumes no linguistic background among readers, and is a must-read for all students of English language and linguistics, media, communication, cultural studies, sociology and psychology who are studying language and society for the first time.

Arvustused

"Language, Society, and Power is an outstanding introduction to the field of sociolinguistics. It addresses topics and issues that are important in the linguistics field but also make immediate and clear connections to students' daily life... Whenever I ask classes if I should use this text again, the students always say yes - with great enthusiasm." Joy Janzen, Stony Brook University, USA "This latest edition is an excellent text to introduce students to Sociolinguistics... I particularly enjoyed the way issues of power and ideology thread through the text with up-to-date examples. Language, Society and Power is an invaluable tool for practitioners and any would-be-practitioner in the fields of language and society." Ayo Amuda, University of South Wales, UK "I adopted this text for my undergraduate general education course on 'Language and Culture' at National Chung Cheng University in Taiwan... Highly recommended!" Victoria Rau, National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan

List of figures
xiii
List of images
xiv
List of tables
xv
Transcription conventions xvi
Preface to the fifth edition xvii
Preface to the fourth edition xviii
Preface to the third edition xx
Preface to the second edition xxii
Preface to the first edition xxiv
Acknowledgements xxvi
1 Language?
1(23)
1.1 Introduction
1(1)
1.2 Why study language?
2(3)
1.3 What is language?
5(5)
1.3.1 Language: a system
5(3)
1.3.2 Language: a system with variation
8(1)
1.3.3 The potential to create new meanings
8(2)
1.4 The `rules' of language: prescription versus description
10(4)
1.5 Power
14(5)
1.5.1 Ideology
17(2)
1.6 `Political correctness'
19(3)
1.7 Summary
22(1)
Further reading
23(1)
2 Language thought and representation
24(20)
2.1 Introduction
24(1)
2.2 Language as a system of representation
24(5)
2.2.1 Different kinds of language
26(2)
2.2.2 Signs and structure
28(1)
2.3 Linguistic diversity
29(3)
2.3.1 Semantics
30(1)
2.3.2 Syntax
31(1)
2.4 The Sapir-Whorf hypothesis
32(3)
2.4.1 Linguistic relativism and determinism
32(2)
2.4.2 Numbers and things
34(1)
2.5 One language, many worlds
35(3)
2.6 A model for analysing language
38(4)
2.6.1 Transitivity
39(3)
2.7 Summary
42(1)
Further reading
42(2)
3 Language and politics
44(25)
3.1 Introduction
44(1)
3.2 What is `polities'?
45(1)
3.3 Politics and ideology
45(2)
3.4 Three persuasive strategies
47(1)
3.5 Fracking: introducing linguistic tools
47(8)
3.5.1 Contrasts
48(1)
3.5.2 Three-part lists and parallelism
48(3)
3.5.3 Pronouns
51(1)
3.5.4 Presupposition
52(1)
3.5.5 Metaphor and intertextuality
53(2)
3.6 Words and weapons: the politics of war
55(3)
3.6.1 Toys and politics
57(1)
3.7 Language, ideology and metaphor
58(5)
3.7.1 Student as customer
61(2)
3.8 Twitter and political agency
63(2)
3.9 Silly citizenship
65(2)
3.9.1 Terrorism alert desk'
65(2)
3.10 Summary
67(1)
Further reading
68(1)
4 Language and the media
69(30)
4.1 Introduction
69(1)
4.2 Mass media
70(1)
4.3 Manufacture of consent
71(5)
4.3.1 Filtering the facts
72(4)
4.4 News values
76(3)
4.4.1 Actors and events
77(2)
4.5 Experts and the news
79(3)
4.6 News online
82(10)
4.6.1 Presentation of news on the internet
86(4)
4.6.2 The inverted pyramid
90(1)
4.6.3 Commenting on the news
91(1)
4.7 Tweeting news
92(2)
4.8 Fake news
94(3)
4.8.1 `Fake news' as delegitimising accusation
95(1)
4.8.2 Fabricated news reports to misinform
95(1)
4.8.3 Fabricated news reports to entertain
96(1)
4.8.4 Comedy news shows
97(1)
4.9 Summary
97(1)
Further reading
98(1)
5 Linguistic landscapes
99(27)
5.1 Introduction
99(1)
5.2 Defining the linguistic landscape
99(13)
5.2.1 Space and meaning
104(2)
5.2.2 Different kinds of signs
106(1)
5.2.3 Top-down and bottom-up as a continuum
107(5)
5.3 Signs and multilingualism and power
112(2)
5.3.1 Invisible language
112(2)
5.4 Signs and ideology
114(2)
5.5 Transgressive signs: graffiti
116(1)
5.6 Online landscapes
117(7)
5.6.1 Twitter
118(1)
5.6.2 Instagram
119(2)
5.6.3 Emoji
121(1)
5.6.4 Memes
122(2)
5.7 Summary
124(1)
Further reading
125(1)
6 Language and gender
126(26)
6.1 Introduction
126(1)
6.2 What is gender?
126(2)
6.3 Inequality at the lexical level
128(6)
6.3.1 Marked terms
128(2)
6.3.2 `Generic' he
130(1)
6.3.3 Sexism in word order
131(2)
6.3.4 Semantic derogation
133(1)
6.4 Differences in language use: doing being a woman or a man
134(2)
6.4.1 Tag questions
135(1)
6.5 Gossip
136(6)
6.5.1 Gossip and men
139(2)
6.5.2 Features of men's talk
141(1)
6.6 Gender and power
142(4)
6.6.1 Do women talk more than men?
143(1)
6.6.2 Gender or power?
144(2)
6.7 Gendered talk: performing identity
146(5)
6.7.1 `Dude'
146(1)
6.7.2 Mate
147(2)
6.7.3 Variation
149(2)
6.8 Summary
151(1)
Further reading
151(1)
7 Language and ethnicity
152(31)
7.1 Introduction
152(1)
7.2 What do we mean by `ethnicity'?
153(1)
7.3 Ethnicity, the nation state and multilingualism
154(1)
7.4 Racism and representations of ethnicity
155(5)
7.4.1 Ethnicity online
158(1)
7.4.2 Reclaiming terms
159(1)
7.5 Ethnicity and language variation
160(9)
7.5.1 `Wogspeak' HRT
160(2)
7.5.2 African-American English syntax
162(2)
7.5.3 Lumbee English syntax/rhoticity
164(2)
7.5.4 Gang identity creaky voice
166(3)
7.5.5 Ethnolect or repertoire?
169(1)
7.6 Ethnicity and identity
169(6)
7.6.1 Mexican ethnicity and code switching
170(2)
7.6.2 African-American ethnicity and lexicon
172(1)
7.6.3 Welsh turfing practice
173(1)
7.6.4 Situated ethnicity
173(2)
7.7 Consequences for ethnolects
175(3)
7.7.1 Caribbean English
175(2)
7.7.2 Australian Aboriginal English
177(1)
7.8 Crossing
178(2)
7.9 Superdiversity
180(1)
7.10 Summary
181(1)
Further reading
181(2)
8 Language and age
183(25)
8.1 Introduction
183(1)
8.2 What do we mean by age?
183(2)
8.3 Early life stage
185(1)
8.3.1 Language used to talk to children
185(1)
8.4 Adolescent life stage
186(8)
8.4.1 What teenagers do?
187(1)
8.4.2 Multiple negation
187(1)
8.4.3 `Like' as a discourse marker
188(2)
8.4.4 Computer-mediated communication and adolescents
190(4)
8.5 Middle life stage
194(1)
8.6 Later life stage
194(10)
8.6.1 Representations of older people
195(1)
8.6.2 Self-representation of older people
196(1)
8.6.3 Language used to talk to older people
197(2)
8.6.4 Construction of age in a travel agency
199(2)
8.6.5 Learning to use the internet
201(3)
8.7 The creep of ageism
204(2)
8.8 Summary
206(1)
Further reading
206(2)
9 Language, class and symbolic capital
208(22)
9.1 Introduction
208(1)
9.2 What is social class?
208(2)
9.3 Attitudes to class
210(4)
9.3.1 Social class as other
210(1)
9.3.2 `Chavspeak'
211(1)
9.3.3 Representations of social class
212(1)
9.3.4 Pittsburghese
213(1)
9.4 Linguistic variation
214(7)
9.4.1 New York City
214(1)
9.4.2 Norwich
215(3)
9.4.3 Glasgow
218(2)
9.4.4 London
220(1)
9.5 Intersection of social class and other variables
221(1)
9.6 Social networks
221(2)
9.7 Communities of practice
223(1)
9.8 Symbolic capital
224(1)
9.9 Revising the British social class model
225(3)
9.9.1 Power and access to symbolic capital
228(1)
9.10 Summary
228(1)
Further reading
229(1)
10 Global Englishes
230(25)
10.1 Introduction
230(1)
10.2 What does global English mean?
231(3)
10.3 Learning English
234(5)
10.3.1 Two models
234(4)
10.3.2 `Lingua franca core'
238(1)
10.4 Inside the inner circle
239(1)
10.5 `Singlish'
240(2)
10.6 Indian English
242(1)
10.7 Pidgins and Creoles
243(1)
10.8 Linguistic marketplace
244(3)
10.8.1 Call centres and English
245(2)
10.9 Linguistic imperialism
247(2)
10.10 What do language varieties mean in the global context?
249(4)
10.10.1 Repertoires
250(1)
10.10.2 Discourse in advertising and linguistic landscapes
251(2)
10.11 Summary
253(1)
Further reading
254(1)
11 Projects
255(10)
11.1 Introduction
255(1)
11.2 Things to bear in mind with data collection
256(2)
11.2.1 What is data?
256(1)
11.2.2 Transcribing
257(1)
11.2.3 Data analysis
257(1)
11.3 Projects
258(5)
11.4 Research resources
263(1)
11.4.1 Where to find published research
263(1)
11.4.2 Other resources
264(1)
Further reading
264(1)
Glossary 265(8)
References 273(23)
Index 296
Annabelle Mooney is Professor of Language and Society at the University of Roehampton, UK. Betsy Evans is Associate Professor of Linguistics at the University of Washington, USA.

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