Software Engineering with UML [Kõva köide]

(Consultant, Wahroonga, Australia)
  • Formaat: Hardback, 390 pages, kõrgus x laius: 254x178 mm, kaal: 907 g
  • Ilmumisaeg: 13-Dec-2017
  • Kirjastus: CRC Press
  • ISBN-10: 1138297437
  • ISBN-13: 9781138297432
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  • Raamatukogudele
    • EBL
  • Formaat: Hardback, 390 pages, kõrgus x laius: 254x178 mm, kaal: 907 g
  • Ilmumisaeg: 13-Dec-2017
  • Kirjastus: CRC Press
  • ISBN-10: 1138297437
  • ISBN-13: 9781138297432
Teised raamatud teemal:

This book presents the analysis, design, documentation, and quality of software solutions based on the OMG UML v2.5. Notably it covers 14 different modelling constructs including use case diagrams, activity diagrams, business-level class diagrams, corresponding interaction diagrams and state machine diagrams. It presents the use of UML in creating a Model of the Problem Space (MOPS), Model of the Solution Space (MOSS) and Model of the Architectural Space (MOAS). The book touches important areas of contemporary software engineering ranging from how a software engineer needs to invariably work in an Agile development environment through to the techniques to model a Cloud-based solution.

Foreword xxi
Preface xxiii
Glossary of Acronyms xxvii
Acknowledgements xxix
Author xxxi
Unique Features xxxv
1 Software Engineering Fundamentals with Object Orientation 1(13)
Learning Objectives
1(1)
Introduction to Software Engineering
1(1)
Learning and Adopting Software Engineering
2(2)
Importance of Modeling
4(1)
Software Engineering Fundamentals
5(2)
Programs, Classes, Objects, and Data
5(1)
The Six Fundamentals (Cornerstone) of Software Engineering
6(1)
Classification (Grouping)
7(1)
Abstraction (Representing)
7(2)
Encapsulation (Modularizing)
9(1)
Association (Relating)
10(1)
Inheritance (Generalizing)
10(1)
Polymorphism (Executing)
11(1)
Software Engineering: A Historical Perspective
12(2)
Evolution of Modeling
12(2)
About the UML and Its Purpose
14(2)
UML Usage
15(1)
Common Errors in Interpreting Software Engineering Fundamentals and How to Rectify Them
16(1)
Discussion Questions
17(1)
Team Project Case Study
17(1)
Endnotes
18
2 Review of 14(25)
Unified Modeling Language Diagrams
19(1)
Learning Objectives
19(1)
List and Nature of UML Diagrams
19(3)
Nature and Basics of UML Diagrams
22(1)
Brief Review of UML Diagrams
22(1)
Use Case Diagrams
22(2)
Activity Diagrams
24(1)
Class Diagrams
25(1)
Sequence Diagrams
25(1)
Interaction Overview Diagrams
26(1)
Communication Diagrams
27(1)
Object Diagrams
27(1)
State Machine Diagram
28(2)
Composite Structure Diagrams
30(1)
Component Diagrams
30(1)
Deployment Diagrams
31(1)
Package Diagrams
31(2)
Timing Diagrams
33(1)
Profile Diagrams
33(1)
Differences in List of UML Diagrams
34(1)
Common Errors in Understanding UML Diagrams and How to Rectify Them
35(1)
Discussion Questions
36(1)
Team Project Case Study
36(1)
Endnotes
37(2)
3 Software Projects and Modeling Spaces: Package Diagrams 39(16)
Learning Objectives
39(1)
Understanding Different Types and Sizes of UML-Based Projects
39(2)
Project Types and UML
39(2)
Project Sizes and UML
41(1)
Organizing the Project
41(3)
Identifying Business Objectives
41(1)
Dividing a Project into Smaller, Manageable Parts
42(1)
Prioritization of Requirements
42(2)
The Three Modeling Spaces in Software Engineering
44(2)
Modeling of the Problem Space
44(1)
Modeling of Solution Space
45(1)
Modeling of Architectural Space
45(1)
Mapping UML to Modeling Spaces
46(2)
Package Diagrams
48(3)
What Is a Package in UML?
48(1)
Creating Package Diagrams
48(2)
Namespaces
50(1)
Strengths of Package Diagrams
50(1)
Weaknesses of Package Diagrams
50(1)
Common Errors in Organizing Project Packages and How to Rectify Them
51(1)
Discussion Questions
52(1)
Team Project Case Study
52(1)
Endnotes
53(2)
4 The Software Development Life Cycle and Agility 55(18)
Learning Objectives
55(1)
Process in Developing Software
55(1)
UML and Process
56(1)
Process Elements
56(2)
Software Development Life Cycles
58(1)
Iterative, Incremental, and Parallel Process in Software Development
59(3)
Iterative
60(1)
Incremental
60(1)
Parallel
60(1)
Time and Effort Distribution in Iterations
60(2)
Agile in Software Development
62(1)
The Agile Manifesto
62(1)
Scrum-An Agile Approach
63(1)
Roles, Ceremonies, and Artifacts
63(4)
Roles
64(1)
Ceremonies
65(1)
Artifacts
65(2)
Charts
67(1)
Disciplined Agile Development
67(1)
Composite Agile Method and Strategy
68(1)
Common Errors in SDLC and Agile Use and How to Rectify Them
69(1)
Discussion Questions
70(1)
Team Project Case Study
71(1)
Endnotes
71(2)
5 Use Case Models-1: Actors and Use Cases 73(24)
Learning Objectives
73(1)
Use Case Modeling in the Problem Space
73(1)
Actors
74(3)
How to Find Actors?
74(1)
Actor Variations
75(3)
Primary versus Secondary Actors
75(1)
Direct versus Indirect Actors
76(1)
Abstract versus Concrete Actors
76(1)
Clarifying Actor-Class Confusion
77(1)
Actor Documentation
78(3)
Actor Documentation for "A10-Patient"
79(1)
Actor Documentation for "A60-Doctor"
80(1)
Use Cases
81(3)
What Is a Use Case?
81(1)
Use Case Variations
81(1)
Finding Use Cases
81(1)
Use Case Documentation
82(1)
Use Case Documentation Template
82(2)
Example: Use Cases in the Hospital Management System
84(8)
Brief Use Case Documentation for HMS
84(3)
Detailed Use Case Documentation for HMS
87(1)
Use Case "RegistersPatient"
88(1)
Use Case "MaintainsCalendar"
89(1)
Use Case "BooksConsultation"
90(1)
Use Case "PaysBill"
91(1)
Strengths and Weaknesses of Use Cases and Actors
92(1)
Strengths of Use Cases
92(1)
Weaknesses of Use Cases
93(1)
Relating Use Cases to Packages
93(1)
Relating Use Cases to Functional Testing
94(1)
Common Errors in Modeling Actors and Use Cases and How to Rectify Them
94(1)
Discussion Questions
95(1)
Team Project Case Study
96(1)
Endnotes
96(1)
6 Use Case Models-2: Use Case Diagrams and Requirements Modeling 97(12)
Learning Objectives
97(1)
Use Case Diagrams
97(2)
Notations of a Use Case Diagram
98(1)
Boundary
98(1)
Notes
98(1)
Actor
98(1)
Use Case
99(1)
Relationships
99(1)
Use Case Relationships
99(2)
Include
99(1)
Extends
100(1)
Inherits (Generalize)
100(1)
Naming a Use Case Diagram
101(1)
Use Case Diagrams for Hospital Management System
101(4)
"Patient Maintenance" Use Case Diagram
101(1)
"Calendar Maintenance" Use Case Diagram
102(1)
"Consultation Details" Use Case Diagram
103(1)
"Accounting" Use Case Diagram
103(2)
Strengths and Weaknesses of Use Case Diagrams
105(1)
Strengths of Use Case Diagrams
105(1)
Weaknesses of Use Case Diagrams
106(1)
Common Errors in Use Case Diagrams and How to Rectify Them
106(1)
Discussion Questions
107(1)
Team Project Case Study
108(1)
Endnotes
108(1)
7 Activity Diagrams, Interaction Overview Diagrams, and Business Process Models 109(18)
Learning Objectives
109(1)
Introduction
109(1)
Activity Diagrams
110(2)
Notations of Activity Diagrams
110(1)
Naming an Activity Diagram
111(1)
Activity Diagrams for Hospital Management System
112(4)
"RegistersPatient" Activity Diagram
112(1)
"MaintainsCalendar" Activity Diagram
113(1)
"BooksConsultation" Activity Diagram
113(2)
"PaysBill" Activity Diagram
115(1)
Strengths and Weaknesses of Activity Diagrams
116(2)
Strengths of Activity Diagrams
116(1)
Weaknesses of Activity Diagrams
117(1)
Interaction Overview Diagram
118(2)
Notations of an Interaction Overview Diagram
118(1)
Naming an Interaction Overview Diagram
118(1)
Interaction Overview for "Consultation Details"
119(1)
Interaction Overview for "Accounting"
119(1)
Strengths and Weaknesses of Interaction Overview Diagrams
120(1)
Strengths of Interaction Overview Diagrams
120(1)
Weaknesses of Interaction Overview Diagrams
120(1)
Business Process Modeling
121(4)
Common Errors in Activity Diagrams, Interaction Overview Diagrams, and Business Process Models and How to Rectify Them
125(1)
Discussion Questions
126(1)
Team Project Case Study
126(1)
8 Class Models-1: Classes and Business Entities 127(18)
Learning Objectives
127(1)
Understanding Business Entities, Classes, and Objects
127(1)
Classes and Business Entities
128(1)
Identifying and Naming Classes
129(2)
Class Identification by Use Case Analysis
129(1)
Class Identification by Sequence Diagrams
130(1)
Naming a Class as a Business Entity
130(1)
Analyzing the "RegistersPatient" Use Case to Identify Classes/Business Entities
131(3)
Class Definitions
134(3)
Class Documentation Template
134(1)
Documenting the Patient Class
135(1)
Class Notation in UML
135(1)
Class Attributes
136(1)
Class Operations (Methods)
137(1)
Naming Conventions for Attributes and Operations
137(1)
Visibilities on a Class
137(1)
Designing a Class in the Solution Space
138(3)
Class Identification in Design (MOSS)
140(1)
Strengths and Weaknesses of Classes
141(1)
Strengths of Classes
141(1)
Weaknesses of Classes
141(1)
Common Errors in Classes and Business Entities and How to Rectify Them
142(1)
Discussion Questions
143(1)
Team Project Case Study
143(2)
9 Class Model-2: Basic Class Diagram 145(14)
Learning Objectives
145(1)
Class Diagrams
145(1)
Notations of Class Diagrams
145(1)
Inheritance Relationship in a Class Diagram
146(1)
Association Relationship in a Class Diagram
147(1)
Aggregation Relationship in a Class Diagram
148(2)
Multiplicities in Class Diagrams
149(1)
Class Diagrams for Hospital Management System
150(4)
"Patient Details" Class Diagram
150(1)
"Staff Details" Class Diagram
151(1)
"Consultation Details" Class Diagram
152(1)
"Accounting" Class Diagram
153(1)
Strengths of Class Diagrams
154(1)
Strengths and Advantages of Class Diagrams
154(1)
Weaknesses of Class Diagrams
155(1)
Common Errors in Basic Class Diagram and How to Rectify Them
155(1)
Discussion Questions
156(1)
Team Project Case Study
156(3)
10 UML's Extensibility Mechanisms: Notes, Stereotypes, Constraints, and Tags 159(12)
Learning Objectives
159(1)
UML's Extensibility Mechanisms
159(1)
Notes
160(1)
Stereotypes
160(5)
Entity Class
163(1)
Boundary Class
163(1)
Control Class
163(1)
Table Classes
163(1)
Utility Classes
164(1)
User-Defined Classes
164(1)
Abstract Classes
164(1)
Interfaces, Roles, and Types
164(1)
Stereotypes for Attributes and Operations
165(1)
Attribute Stereotypes
165(1)
Operation Types
165(1)
Manager Operations
165(1)
Implementer Operations
165(1)
Access Operations
165(1)
Helping Operations
166(1)
Profile Diagram
166(1)
Constraints
166(1)
Tagged Value
166(1)
Common Errors in UML's Extensibility Mechanisms and How to Rectify Them
167(1)
Discussion Questions
168(1)
Team Project Case Study
169(2)
Endnote
169(2)
11 Class Model-3: Advanced Class Designs 171(24)
Learning Objectives
171(1)
Introduction
171(1)
Understanding Class Relationships
172(1)
Notations on an Advanced Class Diagram in the Solution Space
172(1)
Class-to-Class Relationships
172(1)
Advanced Relationships in a Class Diagram in Design
173(2)
Association Relationship in Design
174(1)
Dependency Relationship in Design
175(1)
Interface and Realization Relationship in Design
176(1)
Aggregation Relationship in Design
177(1)
Implementing the Relationships: By References and By Value
178(1)
Parameter Visibility
179(1)
Multiplicities and Object Diagrams
180(2)
Multiplicities in Design
180(1)
Object Diagrams Interpreting Multiplicities
180(1)
Collection Class and Multiplicities
181(1)
Inheritance and Polymorphism in Design
182(4)
Incorporating Polymorphism in Design
182(3)
Multiple Inheritance
185(1)
Incorporating Errors and Exceptions in Design
186(1)
Attribute Identification, Naming, and Definition
187(3)
Naming Attributes
187(1)
Discovering Attributes
188(1)
Attribute (Data) Types
188(1)
Attribute Values
189(1)
Common Errors in Designing Attributes
189(1)
Operation Identification, Naming, and Signature
190(2)
Understanding an Operation in a Class
190(1)
Naming Operations
191(1)
Understanding Operation Signatures
191(1)
Common Errors in Modeling Advance Class Designs and How to Rectify Them
192(1)
Discussion Questions
192(1)
Team Project Case Study
193(2)
12 Interaction Modeling with Sequence Diagrams 195(20)
Learning Objectives
195(1)
Interaction Modeling
195(1)
About Sequence Diagrams
195(1)
Sequence Diagrams in Detail
196(5)
Notations on a Sequence Diagram
196(2)
Creating a Basic Sequence Diagram
198(1)
Relating Sequence Diagrams to Class Diagrams
198(1)
Advancing Sequence Diagrams from Analysis to Design
199(1)
Understanding Focus of Control and Return Message
200(1)
Creating and Destroying an Object
201(1)
Sequence Diagrams in Hospital Management System
201(3)
Sequence Diagrams in the Problem Space
201(3)
Design-Level Sequence Diagrams in the Solution Space
204(5)
Registering a Patient Sequence Diagram in Design
206(1)
Updating a Calendar Sequence Diagram in Design
207(1)
"Changing Booking Times" Sequence Diagram in Design
207(1)
"Paying a Bill" Sequence Diagram in Design
207(2)
Strengths and Weaknesses of Sequence Diagrams
209(1)
Common Errors in Interaction Modeling with Sequence Diagrams and How to Rectify Them
210(1)
Discussion Questions
211(1)
Team Project Case Study
212(3)
13 Database Modeling with Class and Sequence Diagrams 215(20)
Learning Objectives
215(1)
Introduction to Persistence
215(1)
Persistence Mechanisms-Databases
216(2)
Data Storage Mechanisms
216(1)
Object-Oriented Databases
216(1)
NoSQL Database
217(1)
Relational Databases
217(1)
Using Relational Databases in Object-Oriented Designs
218(3)
Challenge of Storing Objects in Relational Tables
218(1)
Mapping
00
Classes to Relational Tables
219(1)
Basic Persistence Functions (CRUD)
220(1)
Robustness in Persistence Design
221(2)
Separating Persistence Operations from Business Logic
221(1)
Robustness in Design Keeping Relational Storage and Objects Separate
222(1)
Inheritance Relationship and Relational Tables
223(1)
Mapping Associations in Relational Tables
224(5)
Multiplicities, Association Class, and Link Table
225(3)
Mapping Aggregation: Composition and Shared Aggregation
228(1)
Shared Aggregation and Reference Table
228(1)
Persistence in Practice for HMS
229(1)
Persistence Design for Patient-Related Classes
229(1)
Additional Example of Persistence Design in HMS
230(1)
Incorporating Database Interface Pattern in HMS Persistence Design
230(2)
Common Errors in Interpreting Database Modeling and How to Rectify Them
232(1)
Discussion Questions
232(1)
Team Project Case Study
233(1)
Endnote
233(2)
14 Dynamic Modeling with State Machine Diagrams 235(14)
Learning Objectives
235(1)
Introduction to Dynamic Modeling with State Machine Diagrams
235(1)
State Machine Diagrams for Dynamic Modeling
236(1)
Notations of State Machine Diagrams
236(1)
State Machine Diagrams for Patient Object in Problem Space
237(2)
"Patient" State Machine Diagram
239(1)
"Consultation" State Machine Diagram
239(1)
"Bill Payment" State Machine Diagram
239(1)
Advanced State Machine Diagram for Patient Object in HMS in Solution Space
239(6)
State Machine Diagram for "Patient" in HMS
240(2)
State Machine Diagram for "Patient_Form," Boundary Object in HMS
242(1)
State Machine Diagram for "ConsultationManager," a Control Object in HMS
243(1)
Steps in Building a State Machine Diagram
244(1)
Common Errors in Modeling State Machine Diagrams and How to Rectify Them
245(1)
Discussion Questions
246(1)
Team Project Case Study
246(1)
Endnote
247(2)
15 Advanced Software Engineering Design Concepts: Reuse, Granularity, Patterns, and Robustness 249(16)
Learning Objectives
249(1)
Introduction
249(1)
Reusability in Software Engineering
250(1)
Levels of Reuse
250(1)
Code-Level Reuse
250(1)
Design-Level Reuse
251(1)
Analysis-Level Reuse
251(1)
Reuse Strategies in Software Projects
251(2)
Encapsulation Facilitates Reuse
252(1)
Reuse as a Culture
252(1)
Generalization versus Specialization in Reuse
253(1)
Granularity in Object-Oriented Design
253(1)
Design Patterns in Software Design Engineering
254(3)
What Are Patterns?
254(1)
Origins of Patterns
255(1)
Structure of a Pattern
255(1)
Using Patterns in the Solution and Architectural Modeling Spaces
255(2)
Robustness in Design
257(3)
Dependencies of Classes
257(1)
Identifying Lack of Robustness
257(1)
Rules of Robustness
258(1)
Incorporating Robustness in Design
258(2)
System Architecture and Design Process
260(2)
Common Errors in Reuse, Granularity, Patterns, and Robustness and How to Rectify Them
262(1)
Discussion Questions
263(1)
Team Project Case Study
264(1)
Endnotes
264(1)
16 Interface Specifications: Prototyping 265(20)
Learning Objectives
265(1)
Introduction to Interfaces
265(2)
Specifying Interface Requirements
266(1)
Interface Specifications for HMS
267(2)
User Interface Specifications for HMS
267(1)
Printer Interface Specifications for HMS
268(1)
External System Interfaces for HMS
269(1)
Examples of User Interface Designs for HMS (Initial Iteration)
269(1)
Specifying the Flow of User Interfaces (HMS Example)
270(3)
Mobile Applications Interfaces
273(1)
Printer Interfaces
273(3)
User Interface Design Considerations
276(3)
Organizing Interface Classes
276(1)
Usability in GUI Design
277(1)
User Categories in GUI Design
278(1)
Prototyping
279(2)
Functional Prototype
279(1)
Technical Prototype
280(1)
Architectural Prototype
280(1)
Prototyping and Quality
280(1)
Common Errors in Interface Specifications and Prototyping and How to Rectify Them
281(1)
Discussion Questions
281(1)
Team Project Case Study
282(1)
Endnotes
282(3)
17 Implementation Modeling with Component, Deployment, and Composite Structure Diagrams 285(14)
Learning Objectives
285(1)
Introduction
285(1)
Component Diagrams
286(2)
Understanding a Component
286(1)
Relevance of Component-Based Software Development
286(1)
Types of Components
287(1)
Representing Components with UML
287(1)
Component Characteristics and Types
288(2)
Component Diagrams for HMS
289(1)
Practical Component Diagram Showing Interdependencies and Packages for HMS
289(1)
Strengths and Weaknesses of Component Diagram
290(1)
Composite Structure Diagram
291(1)
Deployment Diagrams
292(3)
UML Notations on a Deployment Diagram
292(3)
Process Around Implementation Diagrams
295(1)
Common Errors in Implementation Modeling with Component, Deployment, and Composite Structure Diagrams and How to Rectify Them
296(1)
Discussion Questions
296(1)
Team Project Case Study
297(1)
Endnote
297(2)
18 Quality of UML Models with Syntax, Semantic, and Aesthetic Checks 299(12)
Learning Objectives
299(1)
Introduction
299(1)
Quality Management, Assurance, and Control (Testing)
300(1)
Quality Assurance and Model Quality
300(1)
Verification and Validation
301(1)
Syntax, Semantics, and Aesthetics Verify and Validate Artifacts, Diagrams, and Models
301(1)
Application of Syntax, Semantics, and Aesthetics to UML Notations
302(2)
Quality Models-Syntax
302(1)
Quality Models-Semantics
303(1)
Quality Models-Aesthetics
304(1)
Quality Techniques and V&V Checks
304(3)
Levels of Syntax, Semantics, and Aesthetics as Applied to UML-Based Diagrams
305(1)
Syntactic Checks and UML Elements (Focus on Correctness)
306(1)
Semantic Checks and UML Diagrams (Focus on Completeness and Consistency)
306(1)
Aesthetic Checks and UML Models (Focus on Symmetry and Consistency)
307(1)
Common Errors in Quality Assurance and Testing of UML Models and How to Rectify Them
307(1)
Discussion Questions
308(1)
Team Project Case Study
309(1)
Endnotes
309(2)
19 Software Testing: Plan, Design, and Execute 311(22)
Learning Objectives
311(1)
Introduction
311(3)
Testing Needs in a Project
311(1)
Various Types of Testing
312(1)
Test Strategy Influencing Factors
313(1)
Organizing the Testing of Software
314(3)
Test Planning
314(1)
Traceability Matrix
315(1)
Use-Case-Based versus Class-Based Test Design
316(1)
Test Approaches
317(1)
Visibility of Testing-Black Box versus White Box Testing
317(1)
Automation of Testing-Manual versus Automated
317(1)
Slicing of Tests Vertical(Functional) or Horizontal (Technical)
318(1)
Partitioning of Data-Equivalence Partition and Boundary Values
318(1)
Test Architecture
318(1)
Test Designs
319(2)
Test Designs in Solution Space
319(1)
Test Design Format
319(1)
Test Designs for Components
320(1)
Reusability in Test Designs
320(1)
Test Cases in Solution Space
321(1)
Test Case Format
321(1)
Test Data
322(1)
Masking and Blending of Test Data
322(1)
Acceptance Test Cases for Hospital Management System
322(5)
Test Case for "RegistersPatient"
323(1)
Test Case for "MaintainsCalendar"
324(1)
Test Case for "BooksConsultation"
324(1)
Test Case for "PaysBill"
325(1)
Test Case for "PaysBillOnInternet"
326(1)
Test Case for "CashChequePayment"
327(1)
Class-Based Approach to Test Cases in the Solution Space
327(2)
Test Harnesses
327(1)
Verifying Test Cases
328(1)
Operational (NFR) Testing
329(1)
Some Operational Tests
329(1)
Common Errors in Testing in Solution Space and How to Rectify Them
330(1)
Discussion Questions
331(1)
Team Project Case Study
331(1)
Endnotes
332(1)
20 Nonfunctional (Operational) Requirements Specification and Application 333(22)
Learning Objectives
333(1)
Nonfunctional (Operational) Requirements
333(4)
NFRs and UML
334(1)
Source of NFRs
334(1)
Types of Nonfunctional Parameters
335(2)
Composite Agile Method and Strategy and Prototyping for NFRs
337(1)
NFR Categories: Qualities and Constraints
337(3)
NFR Challenges
338(1)
Capturing NFRs in CAMS
339(1)
NFR Levels
340(1)
Performance
341(2)
Response Times and Performance
341(1)
Outsourced Projects and Performance
342(1)
Bandwidth
343(1)
Scalability
343(1)
Scalability and Hardware
344(1)
HMS Example of Scalability Requirement
344(1)
Volume
344(1)
Operating System
344(1)
Mobile OS
345(1)
Accessibility
345(1)
Reliability and Maintenance
346(1)
Environment
346(1)
Legal and Compliance
347(1)
Security
347(2)
Usability and User Experience
349(1)
Applying Usability Requirements to Software Solutions
349(1)
Designing to Prevent Errors
350(1)
Big Data (Velocity, Variety)
350(1)
Cloud
350(1)
Common Errors in Handling NFRs and How to Rectify Them
351(1)
Discussion Questions
352(1)
Team Project Case Study
353(1)
Endnotes
353(2)
21 Emerging Information Technologies and Modeling 355(14)
Learning Objectives
355(1)
Emerging Information Technologies and Modeling
355(2)
SMAC Significance
356(1)
Service Orientation (Analytics, Utilities)
357(1)
Internet of Things
357(1)
Mobile and Social Media Applications
358(1)
Cloud Integration
358(1)
Virtual and Augmented Reality
359(1)
Robotics and Machine Learning
359(1)
Modeling the Not Only SQL Databases
359(1)
Service Orientation Based on the Cloud
360(1)
Designing with Services
361(1)
Core Elements of Web Services
362(1)
XML/SOAP
362(1)
Web Services Description Language
362(1)
Universal Description, Discovery, and Integration
363(1)
Web Services and Modeling
363(3)
Modeling and Usage of Web Services
363(1)
Web Service Metamodels and Dynamics
364(1)
Model-Driven Architecture and Web Services
365(1)
Executable UML
365(1)
Discussion Questions
366(1)
Team Project Case Study
366(1)
Endnotes
366(3)
Appendix A: Case Study Problem Statements for Team Projects 369(6)
Bibliography 375(4)
Index 379
Bhuvan Unhelkar (BE, MDBA, MSc, PhD; FACS) has more than two decades of strategic as well as hands-on professional experience in Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) industry. As a Founder of MethodScience.com he has notable practical consulting and training expertise in business analysis (use cases, BPMN) software engineering (object modeling, Agile processes and quality), Green IT (environment), enterprise architecture (including SOA), project management, collaborative web services and mobile business. His domain experience includes banking, financial, insurance, government as well as telecommunication organizations wherein he has created industry-specific process maps, quality strategies and business transformation approaches. For the past few years, Dr. Unhelkar has been actively involved in researching into Green IT and the environment - and its application in practice. He has supervised a PhD in the area of Environmentally Responsible Business Strategies (by B. Trivedi) as also set up and delivered a two day training course approved by the Australian Computer Society titled Green IT Design and Implementation (delivered around Australia through Connection Research/Envirability). He is winner of the Consensus IT professional award and the IT writer award under the `best author' category.Dr. Unhelkar earned his Doctorate in the area of "object orientation" from the University of Technology, Sydney, in 1997. Subsequently he designed and delivered course units like Global Information Systems, Object Oriented Analysis and Design, Business Process Reengineering and IT Project Management in the industry as well as across Universities in Australia, China and India. He lead the Mobile Internet Research and Applications Group (MIRAG) at the University of Western Sydney, where he is also an adjunct Associate Professor. He has authored/edited sixteen books in the areas of collaborative business, globalization, mobile business, software quality, business analysis, business processes and the UML, and has extensively presented and published papers and case studies.

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