Teaching Primary English: Subject Knowledge and Classroom Practice [Pehme köide]

(formerly University of Cambridge, UK),
  • Formaat: Paperback / softback, 422 pages, kõrgus x laius: 248x191 mm, kaal: 975 g, 14 Line drawings, color; 82 Halftones, color; 12 Tables, color
  • Ilmumisaeg: 01-Dec-2017
  • Kirjastus: Routledge
  • ISBN-10: 1138681563
  • ISBN-13: 9781138681569
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  • Formaat: Paperback / softback, 422 pages, kõrgus x laius: 248x191 mm, kaal: 975 g, 14 Line drawings, color; 82 Halftones, color; 12 Tables, color
  • Ilmumisaeg: 01-Dec-2017
  • Kirjastus: Routledge
  • ISBN-10: 1138681563
  • ISBN-13: 9781138681569

Teaching Primary English is a comprehensive, evidence-informed introduction designed to support and inspire teaching and learning in the primary school. Written in a clear and accessible way, it draws on the very latest research and theory to describe and exemplify a full and rich English curriculum. It offers those on teacher training courses, as well as qualified teachers who are looking to develop their practice, subject knowledge and guidance for effective, enjoyable classroom practice.

Advice and ideas are supported by explicit examples of good teaching linked to video clips filmed in real schools, reflective activities, observational tasks and online resources. Each chapter includes suggestions for great children’s literature, considers assessment throughout and offers support planning for diversity and special educational needs. Key topics covered include:

  • spoken language for teaching and learning
  • storytelling, drama and role play
  • reading for pleasure
  • early reading, including phonics
  • poetry
  • writing composition
  • spelling and handwriting
  • grammar and punctuation
  • responding to and assessing writing
  • multimodal, multimedia and digital texts.

With a focus on connecting all modes of English, the global and the local, and home and school experience, this detailed, uplifting book will support you in developing a curious, critical approach to teaching and learning English.

Additional content can be found on the fantastic supporting website. Features include:

  • video clips from within the classroom to demonstrate English teaching techniques
  • audio resources, including an interactive quiz, to check understanding and provide real-life examples and case studies
  • downloadable resources to support teaching and incorporate into lesson plans.

Arvustused

This book is impressive in its scope and content. I highly recommend this book as the `go to' text for Primary English. Every aspect of teaching English in today's classroom is thoughtfully and clearly presented in well-defined chapters. There is breadth in the discussions, clarity in the analysis of research and reassurance in the suggestions for practical application. Terminology is clearly explained and useful summaries are provided for each aspect presented. There is an excellent balance of academic background and practical advice. I think this is one of the best Primary English texts that I have read. It deserves a place on every teacher's bookshelf. Anne Bradley, University of St. Mark and St. John, UK This book successfully integrates theory, principles and practice across a wide range of elements of English teaching, highlighting strategies to support teachers and enthuse their pupils. The authors share such wisdom with their readers based on their own experiences and knowledge from their perspectives as teachers and researchers, which results in this book being able to offer clear and constructive advice, well justified in the suggestions it offers. I couldn't recommend this book highly enough to experienced and new teachers: the ideas, resources and explanations that are given throughout this book will encourage and enthuse all those involved in Primary English education. Lyndsay Gray, Senior Lecturer in Primary English, Sheffield Hallam University, UK Teaching Primary English is an excellent text book for both ITE students and practicing teachers. It makes clear and explicit links between research and classroom practice giving useful examples that can be used within the classroom. It contains links to additional resources that will benefit teachers and their classes. It is a book that will allow students to develop a passion for English and the knowledge and understanding of how to instil this in the children they teach. It will be essential reading for the courses that I teach. Sarah Smith, Primary ITE Programmes Leader, University of Greenwich, UK This text is invaluable for anyone teaching or training to teach primary English. It is a comprehensive and accessible wealth of information and ideas to develop engaging and inspirational English teaching. Seminal and current research is clearly presented to enable deep understanding and practical application. A positive yet discerning perspective often challenges as it explores what is pivotal to truly effective teaching and learning in English. Karen Tulloch, Senior Lecturer Primary English, St Mary's University, UK Essential reading for all students studying primary English as part of their initial teacher training courses. Theoretical perspectives, practical suggestions and online materials combine to offer the reader a comprehensive guide to teaching English in the primary classroom which will inspire and enthuse teachers everywhere. Suzanne Horton, Subject Leader for Primary English, University of Worcester, UK It is rare to find a textbook that delivers on so many levels. It is the perfect go-to text for teachers, student teachers, and tertiary educators. Reedy and Bearne have integrated theoretical perspectives with explicit links to teaching and learning, and in the process, offered a comprehensive, richly textured, and engaging probe into current exemplary practice. The book has a fresh, contemporary resonance, underscored by effective weaving throughout, of threads of diversity and inclusion. Its layout is logically assembled. Case studies, student voice, chapter overviews and summaries, headings posed as questions, definition panels, websites, and activity suggestions, all invite a high level of interaction with the text. The scope of inquiry is extensive yet particular. Examples are frequently included to illustrate key concepts and the authors' ability to select a variety of children's literature that acts as a conduit for English learning, is one of the many memorable features of this compelling and well-researched publication. The authors are also to be commended for their emphasis on recognizing and building on the funds of knowledge children bring to the classroom, and their acknowledgement of the significant role oral language plays in underpinning literacy development. An emphasis on creativity ensures the book succeeds in exploiting the playful enjoyment experienced in multimodal English learning. This is a timely and relevant text that will help teachers grapple with the challenges of using changing forms of communication to benefit learners and help them grow in confidence. Trish Brooking, Senior Lecturer, University of Otago College of Education, New Zealand I am extremely glad that Bearne and Reedy have taken the time and trouble to bring to fruition such an expert and yet accessible text. It will definitely be one that I will refer to regularly to remind and refresh my thinking about the fascinating subject that is primary English teaching. Sally Wilkinson, Primary SCITT Leader, Suffolk and Norfolk SCITT, UK

List of figures xv
List of website resources xix
List of activities xxii
Acknowledgements xxxvii
Introduction 1(10)
1.1 Making connections
1(2)
1.2 Subject knowledge in English
3(2)
1.3 Long-term planning for English
5(1)
1.4 Planning and teaching sequence: From reading into writing/composition via talk
6(2)
1.5 Using the material in this book
8(3)
Part One: Spoken language 11(96)
Introduction to Part One
13(6)
P11.1 Principles
13(1)
P11.2 Teaching spoken language
14(1)
P11.3 The spoken language curriculum
15(1)
P11.4 A note about Standard English
15(4)
1 Developing talk
19(24)
1.1 Theories of early language acquisition
20(1)
1.2 The development of bilingual speakers
21(1)
1.3 Early language in the home
22(2)
1.4 Language at home and school-supporting the transition
24(2)
1.5 Language deficit or assets?
26(4)
Case Study, middle primary: Finding out about children's home and community language experience
27(3)
1.6 Supporting language in the early years
30(1)
1.7 Functions, audiences, purposes and contexts for spoken language
31(1)
1.8 Children's perceptions about spoken language
31(5)
Case Study, early, middle and upper primary: The classroom environment for spoken language
33(3)
1.9 Spoken language and inclusion
36(7)
2 Spoken language for teaching and learning
43(20)
2.1 The essential role of talk in learning
44(2)
2.2 Teacher/pupil interaction
46(1)
2.3 The repertoire of teaching talk and its characteristics
47(3)
2.4 Moving thinking on
50(2)
Case Study, early primary: Teachers and children thinking together
50(1)
Case Study, middle primary: Maths word problem solving with 8 to 9 year olds
51(1)
2.5 Constructing productive classroom conversations
52(1)
2.6 The practical and social context
53(1)
2.7 The pupils' voices
53(1)
2.8 Teachers and their responses
54(1)
2.9 Building vocabulary
54(2)
2.10 Pupil to pupil talk
56(3)
Case Study, upper primary: Exploratory talk
57(1)
Case Study, upper primary: Deploying the repertoire of talk
58(1)
2.11 Children who speak English as an additional language
59(1)
2.12 A note of caution
59(4)
3 Storytelling, drama and role play
3.1 The uses of story
63(1)
3.2 Stories in the home
64(1)
3.3 Personal stories
65(3)
Case Study, middle primary: Storytelling in the classroom
66(2)
3.4 Prompts for remembering story structures
68(3)
3.5 Children telling stories
71(2)
3.6 Drama and role play
73(2)
3.7 The teacher's role in improvisational classroom drama
75(3)
Case Study, upper primary: Using books as a basis for classroom improvisations
76(2)
3.8 A note about diversity
78(5)
4 Planning for, developing and assessing spoken language
83(24)
4.1 Capturing spoken language achievement
84(1)
4.2 Talk behaviours
84(1)
4.3 Organising groups for spoken language
85(1)
4.4 The purposes of assessment
86(1)
4.5 Finding the evidence
87(1)
4.6 Managing assessment of spoken language
88(1)
4.7 Observing spoken language
88(1)
4.8 Involving children in assessment
89(1)
4.9 Planning for spoken language throughout a teaching sequence
90(10)
Case Study, early primary: Using the planning and teaching sequence: Phase one-focus on spoken language
90(5)
Case Study, middle primary: Planning for and assessing spoken language in history
95(5)
4.10 Describing progress in spoken language
100(1)
4.11 Bilingual or multilingual learners
101(1)
4.12 Children with language and communication difficulties
102(5)
Part Two: Reading 107(166)
Introduction to Part Two
109(6)
P21.1 A history of debate about reading
109(1)
P21.2 What does 'reading' imply?
110(1)
P21.3 Principles about teaching reading
111(1)
P21.4 The reading curriculum
112(3)
5 Perspectives on reading
115(29)
5.1 Perspectives on reading development
116(7)
5.2 Teachers as readers
123(2)
5.3 What can a developed reader do?
125(1)
5.4 Reading on screens
126(4)
Case Study, upper primary: Reading a short film with 9 and 10 year olds
128(2)
5.5 The components of a rich and balanced reading curriculum
130(8)
5.6 Reading by children: Independent reading
138(6)
6 Reading for pleasure
144(24)
6.1 Defining reading for pleasure
145(3)
Case Study, middle primary: Reading information for pleasure
147(1)
6.2 Why is reading for pleasure important?
148(1)
6.3 Children's attitudes to reading
149(1)
6.4 Reading for pleasure in the reading curriculum
150(2)
6.5 Strategies for promoting engagement and enjoyment
152(6)
Case Study, early primary: Incorporating children's reading interests into curriculum planning
153(4)
Case Study, early, middle and upper primary: Planning opportunities for children to read independently
157(1)
6.6 Apps to support reading for pleasure
158(1)
6.7 Creating diverse, comfortable, supportive and social reading environments
159(2)
6.8 Engaging children with challenging texts
161(7)
Case Study, upper primary: Chaucer in the original Middle English-a challenging text
162(6)
7 Early reading including phonics
168(23)
7.1 Early reading development
169(1)
7.2 The reading process
170(9)
Case Study, early primary: Teaching print concepts
172(7)
7.3 Reading strategies
179(1)
7.4 Reading behaviours
180(2)
Case Study, early primary: Reading fluently with expression and intonation
181(1)
7.5 Barriers to early progress in reading
182(2)
7.6 Reading in homes and communities
184(2)
7.7 Reading digital texts
186(5)
8 Comprehension
191(25)
8.1 Defining reading comprehension
192(2)
8.2 The components of comprehension
194(1)
8.3 Teaching comprehension
194(1)
8.4 Inference
195(1)
8.5 The complexity of comprehension
196(1)
8.6 Comprehension strategies
197(7)
Case Study, middle primary: Visualising Cyclops
203(1)
8.7 Reciprocal teaching
204(4)
Case Study, middle primary: A small group reading session using reciprocal teaching
205(3)
8.8 Fluency and comprehension
208(1)
8.9 Using film to support reading comprehension
209(2)
8.10 Directed activities related to texts
211(1)
8.11 Skimming and scanning
212(4)
9 Describing and assessing progress in reading
216
9.1 Assessing reading
217(1)
9.2 The problems of testing
217(1)
9.3 Types of reading assessment
218(1)
9.4 What is involved in becoming a reader?
219(1)
9.5 Developing and assessing range and repertoire
220(4)
Case Study, middle primary: Group reading non-fiction-Shackleton's Journey
223(1)
9.6 Assessing reading behaviours
224(3)
9.7 Assessing reading skills and strategies
227(1)
9.8 Planning and teaching for diversity and differentiation
227(2)
9.9 Children who experience difficulties with reading
229(3)
9.10 Diagnostic assessment
232(2)
9.11 Bilingual readers
234(2)
9.12 Gender and reading
236(2)
9.13 Monitoring, recording and assessing progress in reading
238
10 Poetry
203(70)
10.1 Surrounded by poetry
249(1)
10.2 What is poetry?
250(2)
10.3 A model for teaching poetry
252(1)
10.4 The classroom environment for poetry
253(1)
10.5 The teacher's role
253(2)
10.6 Performing poetry
255(1)
10.7 Reading, talking about and writing poetry
256(3)
10.8 Using personal experience
259(2)
10.9 Poetry across the curriculum
261(2)
Case Study, upper primary: Water cycle rap
261(2)
10.10 Playing with poetry
263(1)
10.11 Narrative poetry
263(5)
Case Study, middle primary: The Tsunami project-writing narrative poetry
264(4)
10.12 Responding to poetry
268(5)
Part Three: Writing 273(141)
Introduction to Part Three
275(5)
P31.1 What is writing for?
275(1)
P31.2 Principles
276(1)
P31.3 The writing curriculum
277(3)
11 What writing involves
280(21)
11.1 Theories of writing development
281(4)
11.2 Teachers as writers
285(2)
11.3 Teachers' writing histories
287(1)
11.4 The range of writing: Type, medium, purpose, readership and function
288(1)
11.5 Pupils' perceptions of writing
289(3)
11.6 Early writing development
292(2)
11.7 Diversity and inclusion
294(7)
12 Writing composition
301(27)
12.1 The process of written composition
302(1)
12.2 Finding a writing voice
303(1)
12.3 Developing voice in the classroom
304(1)
12.4 Writing journals
305(1)
12.5 Making space to write
306(1)
12.6 Professional writers in schools
307(1)
12.7 Writing narrative
308(1)
12.8 Making progress in narrative
309(1)
12.9 Narrative structure
310(5)
Case Study, early primary: Using story maps
311(1)
Case Study, middle primary: Using stories to support narrative structure
312(3)
12.10 Writing non-fiction
315(2)
12.11 Variations on traditional forms of non-fiction
317(2)
12.12 Making progress in non-fiction writing
319(1)
12.13 Scaffolds and writing frames
319(9)
13 Spelling and handwriting
13.1 The complexity of English spelling
328(1)
13.2 What good spellers do
329(1)
13.3 Teaching spelling
330(1)
13.4 Spelling development
330(2)
13.5 Developing a repertoire of spelling strategies
332(5)
Case Study, upper primary: Investigating morphemes
335(2)
13.6 The spelling environment
337(1)
13.7 Spelling homework and spelling tests
338(3)
13.8 The continuing importance of handwriting
341(1)
13.9 Teaching handwriting
341(5)
Case Study, early primary: A handwriting lesson
345(1)
13.10 Keyboard skills
346(1)
13.11 Children who experience difficulties with handwriting
346(2)
14 Grammar and punctuation
348(17)
14.1 Research into teaching and learning sentence grammar
349(3)
14.2 Word classes
352(4)
14.3 Phrases, clauses and sentences
356(1)
14.4 Teaching grammar in context
357(3)
Case Study, early primary: Explicit grammar teaching-present and past tense
358(2)
Case Study, upper primary: Explicit grammar teaching-active and passive verbs
360(1)
14.5 Punctuation
360(2)
14.6 Sentence punctuation
362(3)
Case Study, middle primary: Explicit punctuation teaching
362(3)
15 Responding to and assessing writing
365(22)
15.1 Response, feedback and assessment
366(1)
15.2 A note about differentiation
367(1)
15.3 Assessment, 'correcting' and response
368(1)
15.4 A note about correcting
369(1)
15.5 Self-evaluation, self-assessment and self-regulation
369(3)
Case Study, early primary: Proofreading and self-correcting aged 6
371(1)
15.6 Managing response
372(2)
15.7 Planning, teaching, writing, reviewing, planning
374(1)
15.8 Monitoring progress
374(7)
Case Study, upper primary: Responding to and assessing writing throughout a teaching sequence
375(6)
15.9 Diagnosing difficulties with writing
381(6)
Case Study, middle primary: Amy, a 9-year-old writer
383(4)
16 Multimodal, multimedia and digital texts
387(27)
16.1 Modes and media
388(2)
16.2 Children's experience of digital technology
390(1)
16.3 The New Literacy Studies
390(1)
16.4 Children's cultural and literacy assets or funds of knowledge
391(1)
16.5 Critical literacy
392(1)
16.6 Children's digital practices at home and school
393(3)
Case Study, early, middle and upper primary: Surveying children's use of multimodal texts at home and at school
394(2)
16.7 Computer games
396(4)
Case Study, upper primary: The Barnsborough project-virtual worlds in the classroom
398(1)
Case Study, early, middle and upper primary: Composing with wikis, blogs, pods and vlogs
399(1)
16.8 Reading on screen
400(3)
Case Study, early primary: Using apps for reading
402(1)
16.9 A note about children who experience difficulties with on-screen reading
403(1)
16.10 Using film in the classroom
403(2)
16.11 Describing progress in reading and composing multimodal texts
405(9)
Index 414
Eve Bearne became Project Officer for the National Writing Project after working for twenty years in schools and colleges. When the Project ended, she was appointed to Homerton College, Cambridge, UK, as a Senior Lecturer in Language, before being appointed Assistant Director in Research. Eve was President of the United Kingdom Reading Association from 2003 to 2005 and currently oversees Publications for UKLA. Eve has written and edited many books on English, literacy and children's literature. David Reedy is General Secretary and a past President of the United Kingdom Literacy Association (UKLA). He was Co-Director of the Cambridge Primary Review Trust until 2017. From 2010 to 2014 he worked as Principal Adviser for primary schools in the London Borough of Barking and Dagenham. He has also been a Visiting Fellow at the Institute of Education, University of London, UK. Currently, David works with schools and teachers nationally and internationally to develop effective pedagogical practices, particularly in English. David's most recent publications include Guiding Readers: A handbook for teaching reading comprehension to 7-11 year olds (UCL IoE Press, 2016) and Teaching Grammar Effectively in Key Stage 1 (UKLA, 2016); he has also contributed to Teaching English Creatively 2nd edition (Routledge, 2015).

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