Kaitsmaks meie kliente ning töötajaid on meie Tartu kauplus suletud kuni olukorra rahunemiseni. E-pood on avatud ning pakkide saatmine jätkub tavapärasel viisil.

E-raamat: Virtual World Design

  • Formaat: 405 pages, There is a 16-page color insert containing 16 figures follows page 294; 12 Tables, black and white; 200 Illustrations, black and white
  • Ilmumisaeg: 15-Jul-2014
  • Kirjastus: A K Peters
  • Keel: eng
  • ISBN-13: 9781466579668
Teised raamatud teemal:
  • Formaat - PDF+DRM
  • Hind: 44,79 EUR*
  • * hind on lõplik, st. muud allahindlused enam ei rakendu
  • Lisa soovinimekirja
  • Lisa ostukorvi
  • See e-raamat on mõeldud ainult isiklikuks kasutamiseks.
  • Formaat: 405 pages, There is a 16-page color insert containing 16 figures follows page 294; 12 Tables, black and white; 200 Illustrations, black and white
  • Ilmumisaeg: 15-Jul-2014
  • Kirjastus: A K Peters
  • Keel: eng
  • ISBN-13: 9781466579668
Teised raamatud teemal:

DRM piirangud

  • Kopeerimine (copy/paste):

    ei ole lubatud

  • Printimine:

    ei ole lubatud

  • Kasutamine:

    E-raamatu lugemiseks on vaja luua Adobe ID ning laadida arvutisse Adobe Digital Editions. Lähemalt siit. E-raamatut saab lugeda ning alla laadida kuni 6'de seadmesse.
    E-raamatut ei saa lugeda Amazon Kindle's. Ülejäänud meie e-poes pakutavad e-lugerid võimaldavad lugeda Adobe ID-ga kaitstud e-raamatuid.

Learn How to Create Immersive Virtual Environments Written by an award-winning designer with 20 years of experience designing virtual environments for television and online communities, Virtual World Design explores the intertwining disciplines of 2D graphics, 3D models, lighting, sound, and storytelling. It illustrates how these disciplines come together by design in the creation of an accessible virtual environment for teaching, research, and entertainment. The book gives anyone the tools and techniques to design virtual environments that support their message and are accessible by all. With 200 illustrations and 12 step-by-step projects, the book delivers hours of creative challenges for people working in public virtual worlds or on private grids. Using the modular components available for download on the author's website, readers learn by building such things as a virtual classroom, an "all-access" terrain, and a sound-based game. This book can be the foundation for class work in distance learning, simulation, and other learning technologies that use virtual environments. It shows both novices and advanced users how 3D composition, color, lighting, and sound design are used in the creation of an immersive virtual environment.
Preface xvii
Acknowledgments xxi
About the Author xxiii
About the Contributors xxv
Chapter 1 Introduction to Virtual Worlds and Designing for Them 1(14)
1.1 Welcome to the Infinite Visualization Tool, a Virtual World
1(1)
1.2 A Short History of Virtual Worlds
1(5)
1.2.1 Visual Theory and Creation of the First Illusions
1(2)
1.2.2 Trompe l'oeil, Photorealism, and the Projected Image
3(1)
1.2.3 The Birth of Cinema, Electronic Screens, and the Start of Immersive 3D Design
4(1)
1.2.4 Computer-Created 3D Space and Early Virtual Worlds
4(1)
1.2.5 Gaming and Virtual Worlds
5(1)
1.3 How Do They Work?
6(3)
1.3.1 So Many Worlds, So Little Time
9(1)
1.4 Who Uses Virtual Worlds and How They Use Them
9(1)
1.4.1 Architects/Landscaping Designers
9(1)
1.4.2 Artists/Painters, Sculptors, Dancers, Actors
9(1)
1.4.3 Engineers/Medical Professionals
9(1)
1.4.4 Designers, Set Designers, Interior Designers
10(1)
1.4.5 Scientists and Mathematicians
10(1)
1.4.6 Teachers in Primary, Secondary, and Graduate Schools
10(1)
1.4.7 Trainers and Therapists
10(1)
1.5 Virtual Environments from a Designer's Point of View
10(1)
1.5.1 Defining the Job of a Virtual Environment Designer
11(1)
1.5.2 Being a Designer "In the Know"
11(1)
1.6 Designing in a Preexisting Virtual World or Making One Yourself
11(2)
1.6.1 Prebuilt Grids/Hosted Grids
11(2)
1.6.2 Do It Yourself
13(1)
1.7 Conclusion
13(1)
References
13(2)
Chapter 2 How to Use This Book and Start Doing Virtual World Design 15(6)
2.1 Introduction
15(1)
2.2 How to Use This Book
15(1)
2.2.1 If You Are Totally New to Virtual Worlds
15(1)
2.2.2 Been There, Done That: Old Hand at Virtual Worlds
15(1)
2.3 How To Get and Upload the Content for This Book into Your Virtual World
16(2)
2.3.1 Where to Get the Content and Information About It Online
16(1)
2.3.2 Best Practices for Naming Conventions When Uploading Content into Your Virtual World
16(1)
2.3.2.1 Tab 1—Level of Detail (LOD) Guidelines to Follow on Upload from Source
16(1)
2.3.2.2 Tab 2—Physics Guidelines to Follow
17(1)
2.3.2.3 Tab 3—Upload Options to Use
17(1)
2.3.3 Known Problems with Uploads in Second Life and OpenSim
17(4)
2.3.3.1 Licensing Information
17(1)
2.3.3.2 HOW. fo Use the LSL Scripts Provided
18(1)
2.4 Operating System and System Configuration for Your Computer
18(1)
2.5 Who This Book Was Written For
18(1)
2.6 How to Pick Your Viewer for a Virtual World
19(2)
Chapter 3 "Build It Once": Optimizing Your Design Workflow 21(18)
3.1 Overview: Reducing Repetitive Building and Increasing Creative Design Time
21(1)
3.2 Five Basic Steps to Set Your Standards and Practices
21(4)
3.2.1 Organize Your File Structure
21(1)
3.2.2 Clarify Your Terminology, Going Even Deeper
22(2)
3.2.3 Standardize Your Resolutions
24(1)
3.2.4 Streamline Your Upload Methodology and Test Everything
24(1)
3.2.5 Create a Detailed Plan
24(1)
3.3 Lines and Arrows and Charts, Oh My!
25(10)
3.3.1 "Build It Once" Content Flow System
25(2)
3.3.2 "Build It Once" Chart of Studio Skills and Responsibilities
27(3)
3.3.3 "Build It Once" Project Development Workflow
30(1)
3.3.4 Organizational Structure for a Large Design Office
30(4)
3.3.5 Organizational Structure for a Small Design Office
34(1)
3.4 Conclusions about "Build It Once"
35(1)
3.5 Project: Getting Your Design Studio Organized with a "Critical Path" Technique
35(2)
References
37(2)
Chapter 4 Concepts in 3D Design for Virtual Environments 39(34)
4.1 Introduction to 31:5 Design
39(1)
4.1.1 A Universal Language that You Experience Constantly
39(1)
4.2 Design Elements in Virtual Environments
39(5)
4.2.1 Line
39(2)
4.2.2 Space
41(1)
4.2.3 Shape
41(2)
4.2.4 Form
43(1)
4.2.5 Color
43(1)
4.2.6 Texture
43(1)
4.3 Compositional Methodology for the Six Basic Elements in Virtual Environments
44(6)
4.3.1 Defining the Level of Dimensionality
44(1)
4.3.2 Establishing Unity
44(1)
4.3.3 Point, Line, and Plane
44(2)
4.3.4 Balance
46(1)
4.3.5 Hierarchy
47(1)
4.3.6 Scale
47(1)
4.3.7 Dominance
48(2)
4.3.8 Movement
50(1)
4.4 Using Similarity and Contrast in 3D Design
50(11)
4.4.1 Managing Similarity and Contrast
52(1)
4.4.2 Spatial Contrasts
52(1)
4.4.3 Positional Contrasts
52(1)
4.4.4 Form Contrasts
52(2)
4.4.5 Directional Contrasts
54(1)
4.4.6 Structural Contrasts
54(1)
4.4.7 Size Contrasts
54(2)
4.4.8 Color Contrasts
56(1)
4.4.9 Texture Contrasts
56(2)
4.4.10 Density/Opacity Contrasts
58(1)
4.4.11 Gravitational Contrasts
58(1)
4.4.12 Social Contrast
58(1)
4.4.13 Gaming Contrasts
59(1)
4.4.14 Interactivity Contrast
60(1)
4.5 Designing "Flow" into Virtual Environments
61(2)
4.5.1 First Questions a Designer Should Ask before Designing Anything
61(2)
4.6 Education, Serious Games, Virtual Environments
63(1)
4.7 Project: Assembling a Modular Virtual Classroom
63(7)
4.7.1 Creating a Plan
63(1)
4.7.2 Setting the Foundation and Learning about the Parts
64(1)
4.7.3 Assembling the First Floor
65(1)
4.7.4 Adding the Door and Window Details to the First Floor
66(1)
4.7.5 Creating the Second Floor
66(1)
4.7.6 Removing the Alignment Cubes and Creating a "Handle"
66(1)
4.7.7 Adding in the Ramps
66(4)
4.8 Conclusions and Take-Away Ideas
70(1)
References
70(3)
Chapter 5 Virtual Terrain and Designing Landscapes 73(26)
5.1 Terrain Is More than Just Dirt
73(2)
5.1.1 Fundamental Aspects of a Virtual Terrain
73(2)
5.1.2 Research and Finding Inspiration for Making Compelling Terrain Designs
75(1)
5.2 Methodologies for Terraforming Using Inworld Tools
75(6)
5.2.1 Important Settings and Land Tools in the Firestorm Viewer
75(4)
5.2.2 Testing the Functionality of the Built-in Land Tools
79(2)
5.3 Methodologies for Terraforming Using Height Maps
81(2)
5.3.1 Region Controls for Terrain Loading and Textures
81(1)
5.3.2 Examining a Benchmark Terrain for Your Region
81(2)
5.4 Making Wheely Island, a Wheelchair-Accessible Virtual Park
83(5)
5.4.1 Roughing in the Terrain Shapes of Wheely Island Using the Second Life Terrain Format
83(3)
5.4.1.1 Making the Coastline
85(1)
5.4.1.2 Filling in the Landforms
85(1)
5.4.1.3 Smoothing the Terrain
85(1)
5.4.1.4 First Upload of Your Terrain
86(1)
5.4.2 Refining the Terrain
86(2)
5.5 Adding Terrain Textures to Your Landscape
88(3)
5.5.1 Considerations for Making Good Terrain Textures
91(1)
5.6 Other Applications for Creating Landscapes
91(1)
5.7 Designing Access for All
92(2)
5.7.1 Laying Out the Walkways for Wheely Island
92(2)
5.7.2 Safety Barriers on Wheely Island
94(1)
5.8 Making an "All-Access" Element: The Basic Sign
94(1)
5.8.1 Consider the Viewer
95(1)
5.9 Planting Trees and Other Landscaping on Wheely Island
95(1)
5.10 Making Your Own Trees for Landscaping
95(2)
5.11 Conclusions and Recap
97(1)
References
97(2)
Chapter 6 3D Modeling, 2D Graphics, and Data Visualization 99(28)
6.1 Spatial Perception and How That Applies to Three-Dimensional Modeling and Virtual Environments
99(1)
6.2 Picking a 3D Modeling Program and a Methodology for Building
100(3)
6.2.1 Three Possible Scenarios for 3D Modeling Methods
102(1)
6.2.1.1 Scenario 1: The "Basic Geometry/Basic Textures" Approach
102(1)
6.2.1.2 Scenario 2: The "50/50" Approach
102(1)
6.2.1.3 Scenario 3: The "90/10" Approach
103(1)
6.3 Building with the Inworld Prims (Primitive Objects)
103(5)
6.3.1 The Box
104(1)
6.3.2 The Cylinder
104(1)
6.3.3 The Prism
104(2)
6.3.4 The Sphere
106(1)
6.3.5 The Torus
106(1)
6.3.6 The Tube
106(2)
6.3.7 The Ring
108(1)
6.4 Meshes and How These Can Be Imported
108(1)
6.4.1 The Basics of Importing a Mesh Model
109(1)
6.5 Sculpt Maps (Sculpties) and How They Led to Mesh
109(3)
6.6 Concepts in Texture Creation, 2D Graphics
112(1)
6.6.1 Qualities of Great Textures
112(1)
6.7 Utilizing the Texture Menu in the Build Editor ,
113(6)
6.8 Specialized Textures: Animated, Transparency, and Baked Lighting with Ambient Occlusion
119(1)
6.8.1 Textures with Animation
119(1)
6.8.2 Textures with Transparency: Two Methods for Creating Them
119(1)
6.8.3 Textures with Baked Lighting and Ambient Occlusion
120(1)
6.9 Project: Designing a Data Visualization Environment: Your 3D Timeline or R6sume
120(4)
6.9.1 Make the Timeline Base
122(1)
6.9.2 Adding Details
123(1)
6.9.3 Landmarks and Focal Points
123(1)
6.10 Art and Data Visualization in a Virtual World
124(2)
6.11 Conclusion
126(1)
References
126(1)
Chapter 7 Color, Particles, and Sensory Spaces 127(28)
7.1 The Impact of Color and the Power of Particles
127(1)
7.2 Understanding the Basics of Light and Color
127(3)
7.2.1 Defining the Rainbow and Creating the Color Scale over History
127(1)
7.2.2 Basic Color Terms You Should Know
128(2)
7.2.3 Using the Color Menu in the Texture Editor for Color Settings on Particle Systems
130(1)
7.3 Color from a Designer's Perspective
130(7)
7.3.1 Who Are You Designing For? Five Factors That Affect Color Preferences
132(5)
7.3.1.1 Cultural and Geographic Influences
132(1)
7.3.1.2 Gender and Self-Identity-Based Influences
132(3)
7.3.1.3 Educational and Socioeconomic Influences
135(1)
7.3.1.4 Chronological and Generational Influences
135(1)
7.3.1.5 Psychological and Experiential Influences
135(2)
7.4 Color, Colored Light, and Perception
137(5)
7.4.1 Color, Perceived Scale, Perspective, and Progression in an Environment
137(2)
7.4.2 Color and How It Affects Your Perception, Judgment, and Senses
139(1)
7.4.3 Color, Environmental Energy, and Planning for an Overall Palette
140(2)
7.5 Color and Design for All: Working toward an Accessible Palette
142(1)
7.6 Particles and Their Uses in Design
142(4)
7.6.1 What Are Particle Systems?
142(1)
7.6.2 Particle System Basics in Second Life and OpenSim
143(1)
7.6.3 List of Modifiers in a Particle Script
143(2)
7.6.4 Basic Rules for Using Particles and Instantiation
145(1)
7.6.5 Textures for Particles
146(1)
7.6.6 Designing with Particles
146(1)
7.7 Project: Designing a Colored Light and Particle Effect
146(8)
7.7.1 Setting Up the Sensory Space Inworld Using WindLight to "Set the Scene"
147(2)
7.7.2 Creating Particle Emitters, Lights, and Making Them Move
149(5)
7.8 Conclusions about Color
154(1)
References
154(1)
Chapter 8 Lighting in Virtual Environments: Second Life and OpenSim 155(16)
8.1 Lighting Is Crucial
155(1)
8.2 Three Main Jobs That Lighting Has to Do
155(2)
8.2.1 Illuminating the Meaning (or Purpose) of Your Virtual Environment
155(1)
8.2.2 Support the Mood or Emotion of the Environment
156(1)
8.2.3 Augment the Visual Style of the Project
156(1)
8.3 Spectrums, Color, and Light
157(1)
8.4 Space to Color to Light: Forming a Lighting Methodology
157(2)
8.5 The Three Basic Elements Involved in Lighting a Scene: Lights, Shaders, and Baking
159(2)
8.5.1 Light Sources and Their Characteristics
159(2)
8.5.2 Shaders and Textures and How They Make Materials
161(3)
8.5.2.1 Defining Shaders, Textures, and Materials in Second Life and OpenSim
161(1)
8.6 Environmental Menus and Shaders in Second Life and OpenSim
161(3)
8.7 The Importance of Shadows
164(1)
8.7.1 Ambient Occlusion
164(1)
8.8 Help Your Design Look Great in All Sorts of Lighting
164(1)
8.8.1 Making Sure Your Lighting Is Seen
165(1)
8.8.2 Per Vertex Lighting versus Per Pixel Lighting
165(1)
8.9 Project: Lighting Three Basic Scenes
165(5)
8.9.1 Lighting for a Portrait of an Avatar in a Daytime Outdoor Environment
165(2)
8.9.2 Lighting for a Night Scene in a Large-Size Indoor Environment
167(1)
8.9.3 Lighting for a Product Shot
167(3)
References
170(1)
Chapter 9 Cameras and Collaborative Spaces (the Ideagora) 171(20)
9.1 Overview of Cameras, Narrative, and Social Spaces for Meetings
171(3)
9.1.1 Presence
172(1)
9.1.2 Affordance
172(1)
9.1.3 Participation
173(1)
9.2 Presenting and Collaborating on Ideas in a Virtual World
174(2)
9.2.1 Serious Games in the Workplace
176(1)
9.2.2 Making a "Storytelling" Place
176(1)
9.3 Description and Functional Aspects of Virtual Cameras in a Presentation
176(3)
9.3.1 What Is a Virtual Camera?
176(1)
9.3.2 First- and Third-Person Points of View in a Virtual Camera
177(2)
9.3.3 Types of Camera Control for Presentation Purposes
179(1)
9.4 Designing for a Presentation
179(3)
9.4.1 General Qualities of a Good Presentation Space
179(2)
9.4.2 Fostering the Ideagota Spirit by Personalizing the Space for Your Group
181(1)
9.5 Designing for the Future and Mobility
182(1)
9.5.1 Internet Trends toward Mobile Platforms and How They Affect Design
182(1)
9.5.2 New User Interfaces: Touch, Voice, and Gesture
183(1)
9.6 Project: Building an Ideagora for Your Team
183(5)
9.6.1 Setting Up the Terrain and Loading in the Elements for the Ideagora
183(2)
9.6.1.1 Setting Up the Terrain
183(1)
9.6.1.2 Loading in the Ideagora
183(2)
9.6.1.3 Personalizing Your Ideagora
185(1)
9.6.1.4 Landscaping around the Ideagora
185(1)
9.6.2 Set Up Shared Media
185(1)
9.6.2.1 The Screens
185(1)
9.6.2.2 Editing the Model for Presentation of Media
186(1)
9.6.3 Check the Usability of the Ideagora
186(2)
9.6.4 Emergent Usage of the Ideagora
188(1)
9.7 A Brief Conclusion
188(1)
References
189(2)
Chapter 10 Virtual Goods and Design for Virtual Shopping Environments 191(28)
10.1 Why Do People Buy Virtual Goods?
191(1)
10.1.1 Customization
191(1)
10.1.2 Communication
191(1)
10.1.3 Competition
191(1)
10.2 Consistent Brand Identity from Your Logo to the Architecture of Your Shop
192(3)
10.2.1 Architectural Style
193(1)
10.2.2 Signage/Display
193(2)
10.2.3 Color/Lighting
195(1)
10.3 The Physical Aspects of an Effective Inworld Virtual Store
195(4)
10.3.1 Store Size and Scale
197(1)
10.3.2 Traffic Patterns and Types of Display
197(1)
10.3.3 Shopping and Social Space
198(1)
10.3.4 Visual and Aural Ambiance
198(1)
10.3.5 Search Listing and Description
198(1)
10.4 Setting Up Your Shop in the Online Marketplace
199(1)
10.4.1 Logo, Tagline, and Branding Elements on the Second Life Marketplace
199(1)
10.4.2 Display Images of Content for Sale on the Second Life Marketplace
199(1)
10.4.3 Descriptive Terms and Keywords on the Second Life Marketplace
199(1)
10.4.4 Statements of Store Policies and Mission on the Second Life Marketplace
200(1)
10.5 Using Social Media and Games to Popularize Your Content
200(2)
10.6 Performance Spaces Added to Retail
202(1)
10.7 Project: Designing and Building a "Pop-up" Shop
202(14)
10.7.1 Laying the Groundwork
203(3)
10.7.1.1 Preparing the Land for Your Shop
203(1)
10.7.1.2 Setting in the Foundation and About Land Permissions
203(3)
10.7.1.3 Setting Up Music for the Shop
206(1)
10.7.1.4 Setting Up Access and How to Ban Unwanted Avatars
206(1)
10.7.2 Building the Shop Structures from Prefab Parts
206(5)
10.7.2.1 Setting Up the Shop Floor and Walls
209(1)
10.7.2.2 Putting on the Roof and Giant Lamps
210(1)
10.7.3 Building Content, Setting Prices, Descriptions, and Listings
211(3)
10.7.3.1 Making a Table Lamp Prototype
211(1)
10.7.3.2 Developing the Product Line
211(3)
10.7.4 Setting Up the Shop Display
214(1)
10.7.4.1 Display Layout and Design for Selling
214(1)
10.7.5 Adding the Signage, a Simple Shop Greeter, and a Note Card Giver
214(2)
10.7.5.1 Branding Your Shop Signage with the Logo
214(1)
10.7.5.2 Making a Note Card for Your Shop
214(2)
10.7.5.3 Set Up an Automatic Greeter and Note Card Giver for Your Shop
216(1)
10.7.6 Get the Word Out and Open for Business
216(1)
10.8 Conclusions about Virtual Commerce and Shopping Spaces
216(1)
References
217(2)
Chapter 11 Sound Design for Virtual Spaces 219(18)
11.1 Discovering Sound in Your Environment
219(3)
11.1.1 Game Sound and How It Is Adaptive Audio
220(1)
11.1.2 Considering Movie Scores and Virtual Soundscapes
220(2)
11.2 Just a Bit of Sound Theory to Deepen Your Understanding
222(1)
11.2.1 Alchemy Sims Storytelling Soundscape
222(1)
11.3 Basic Qualities of Sound in a Virtual World
222(2)
11.3.1 A Bit about Binaural Sound
224(1)
11.4 Building Basics for a Sound Environment
224(1)
11.4.1 Types of Sound Supported in Virtual Environments
224(1)
11.4.2 Requirements for Sound Files When Importing Them to Virtual Environments
225(1)
11.5 How to Control Sound in a Virtual World
225(1)
11.6 Where to Obtain Sound for Your 3D Spaces
226(1)
11.7 How to Edit the Sound for Your Virtual Environment
226(2)
11.7.1 Step by Step toward a Soundscape
226(2)
11.8 Project: Making an Audio-Based Gaming Environment
228(7)
11.8.1 Preliminary Game Space Layout
228(1)
11.8.2 The Sound Emitter Setup
228(3)
11.8.3 Making the Sound Emitters Specific to Sound and Trigger
231(1)
11.8.4 Laying Out the Audio Landscape of the Game
232(1)
11.8.5 Making the Signage and Entrance
233(1)
11.8.6 How to Set Up for Play Testing Your Audio Game
234(1)
11.8.7 Play Testing and Some Things You Can Expect
235(1)
11.9 Final Thoughts about Sound Design
235(1)
References
236(1)
Chapter 12 Avatars and Nonplayer Characters 237(20)
12.1 Avatars and Our Sense of Self
237(2)
12.2 The Importance of Avatars
239(1)
12.3 Designing the Look of Your Character
239(2)
12.3.1 Where to Shop for Your Avatar
240(1)
12.3.2 Making Your Own Clothing and Accessories
240(1)
12.4 Animating Your Avatar
241(1)
12.4.1 How Do You Obtain Animations?
241(1)
12.5 What Are Nonplayer Characters?
241(1)
12.6 Types of NPCs and How They Can Be Used in Virtual Environments
242(2)
12.6.1 Setting the "Stage": Proper Behavior in Your NPCs
242(1)
12.6.2 City of Uruk: A Sumerian Town Comes to Life
242(1)
12.6.3 Roles Those NPCs Can Play
242(2)
12.7 Designing the Environment for the Inclusion of NPCs
244(1)
12.7.1 Key Components to Consider When You Design for NPCs
244(1)
12.8 Setting Up and Designing the Look of Your NPCs in Second Life
245(1)
12.9 Setting Up and Designing the Look of Your NPCs on an OpenSim Region
245(1)
12.10 NPCs and Their Future Development
245(1)
12.11 Project: Setting Up a Basic Avatar in a Virtual Environment
246(10)
12.11.1 Creating a New User and Making the User Manifest
246(1)
12.11.2 Looking Over the Clothing Options and Layers
246(3)
12.11.3 Editing Eyes, Hair, and Skin
249(1)
12.11.4 Adjusting the Parameters of Your Avatar, Shape, Size, and Other Details
249(4)
12.11.5 Adjusting the Face, Adding a Tattoo or a Skin Texture
253(1)
12.11.6 Utilizing Texture Maps to Make Custom Avatar Clothes, Preparing Attachments
253(1)
12.11.7 Adding Attachments for Hair
253(1)
12.11.8 Advanced Avatar Development
253(3)
12.12 Final Observations
256(1)
References
256(1)
Chapter 13 Prototyping the Real World in a Virtual Environment 257(20)
13.1 Prototyping and Workflow: Where and How Do Virtual Worlds Fit In?
257(1)
13.2 Introduction to Worldwide Group Collaboration and Why You Should Use It
258(2)
13.3 Math, Molecules, and Military Engineering
260(3)
13.4 Entertainment Environments: Prototyping the Performance Space
263(2)
13.5 Prototyping Games in a Virtual World
265(1)
13.6 Project: Prototyping a Virtual Space and Making a 3D Print from It
266(10)
13.6.1 Making a Maze Pattern
266(1)
13.6.2 Setting Up and Building the Maze Base in SketchUp
266(2)
13.6.3 Setting Up Drawing Guides for the Walls of the Maze
268(1)
13.6.4 Drawing the Walls of the Maze
268(2)
13.6.5 Making a Hanging Tab
270(1)
13.6.6 Export the Model and Import It to a Virtual Environment
270(3)
13.6.7 Looking at the Model Inworld
273(1)
13.6.8 Sending the Model to be 3D Printed
273(3)
References
276(1)
Chapter 14 Scripting Basics for the Designer 277(18)
14.1 Introduction to Scripting in LSL
277(1)
14.2 Design Thinking and Scripts
277(2)
14.2.1 Setting Design Goals for a Scripted Environment
277(1)
14.2.2 Building a Reactive Environment
278(1)
14.3 An Overview of How LSL Scripts Work
279(1)
14.4 About the Script Editor
280(3)
14.4.1 Your First Script
280(2)
14.4.2 The Script Text Editor and Its Parts
282(1)
14.5 Breakdown: Finding the Parts of a Basic Script
283(5)
14.5.1 A Basic Script in OpenSim
283(1)
14.5.2 A Basic Script in Second Life
284(1)
14.5.3 Creating a Script Using Autoscript
285(2)
14.5.4 Review of Basic Script Elements
287(1)
14.5.5 Some New Script Elements: Constants and Variables
287(1)
14.6 Do It Yourself or Hire a Scripter?
288(1)
14.7 How to Talk to a Scripter about LSL Scripts You Need
289(1)
14.8 Scripting and Various Performance Pitfalls
290(1)
14.9 Debugging and Testing and the Importance of Those Tasks
291(2)
14.10 Moving on to More Complex Scripting
293(1)
14.10.1 Other Scripts Mentioned in This Book
293(1)
14.10.2 Major Script Lists for OpenSim and Second Life
293(1)
14.11 Conclusion and Road Map for Learning More
293(1)
Reference
293(2)
Chapter 15 HUDs in Virtual Environments 295(20)
15.1 What Are HUDs?
295(2)
15.1.1 Attaching a Cube Prim to Your Screen to Test HUD Alignment
295(2)
15.2 Types of HUDs
297(5)
15.2.1 Animation Overrides
297(1)
15.2.2 Attachment Controls to Customize Hair, Clothes, Shoes, Animal Attachments
298(1)
15.2.3 Combat Systems, Spell Casting, and Spying
298(1)
15.2.4 Games
299(1)
15.2.5 Invitations, Announcements, and Tour Guides
299(1)
15.2.6 Magazines and Books
300(1)
15.2.7 Multitool HUDs
300(1)
15.2.8 Photo Shoot, Camera, and Machinima Controls
301(1)
15.2.9 Radar, Location, and Teleport HUDs
301(1)
15.2.10 Vehicles
301(1)
15.3 Design Considerations
302(2)
15.3.1 Design Questions Regarding Immersion
302(1)
15.3.2 Design Questions Regarding Flow
302(2)
15.4 Some HUD Design Ideas and How They Have an Impact on Immersion
304(2)
15.4.1 Using HUDs for the "Cockpit Experience"
304(1)
15.4.2 Using HUDs for Camera Control
304(1)
15.4.3 Setting the Mood with a HUD
305(1)
15.4.4 Using HUDs to Play a Game
305(1)
15.5 Some Things to Remember When You Use HUDs
306(2)
15.6 Tools to Make HUDs
308(1)
15.7 Project: Creating a "Favorite Links" HUD
308(5)
15.7.1 Create and Upload Your Button Textures
308(1)
15.7.2 Making the Stack of Buttons and Back Plate
308(1)
15.7.3 Inserting the Scripts into Your Buttons
308(2)
15.7.4 Setting the Scale and Position of Your New HUD
310(1)
15.7.5 Final Tweaks and Congratulations
310(3)
15.8 Conclusions about HUDs
313(1)
References
313(2)
Chapter 16 Machinima in Virtual Worlds 315(24)
16.1 What Is a Machinima?
315(3)
16.1.1 The Uses of Machinima
315(3)
16.2 Defining Your Narrative and Presentation Style
318(5)
16.3 Visual Narrative and the Camera
323(7)
16.3.1 Types of Camera Distance and Their Narrative Qualities
324(1)
16.3.2 Types of Camera Angles and Their Narrative Qualities
324(1)
16.3.3 Types of Camera Moves and Their Narrative Qualities
324(5)
16.3.4 Scripts and Storyboards: Why They Are Crucial to Your Success
329(1)
16.4 Tools Needed for Machinima
330(2)
16.4.1 The Basic Setup for Recording
330(1)
16.4.2 Basic Editing
330(2)
16.4.3 Sound and Musical Score Sources for Your Machinima
332(1)
16.5 Machinima Policy and Your Work
332(1)
16.6 Camera Tools and Phototools in Firestorm
332(2)
16.6.1 Phototools Breakdown by Tab
332(7)
16.6.1.1 WindLight Tab
332(2)
16.6.1.2 Light Tab
334(1)
16.6.1.3 DOF/Glow Tab
334(1)
16.6.1.4 General Render and Aids Tabs
334(1)
16.6.1.5 Camera Control Tab
334(1)
16.7 Conclusion
334(4)
References
338(1)
Chapter 17 The Future, Design, and Virtual Worlds 339(6)
17.1 Some Predictions for the Future and Their Impact on Your Design Outlook
339(1)
17.1.1 The End of Moore's Law
339(1)
17.1.2 Increased Adoption of Haptic Technology
339(1)
17.1.3 Increased Customization of Products
339(1)
17.2 Emerging Technologies and New Design Methodologies
340(1)
17.2.1 Laser Scanning and 3D Model Making
340(1)
17.2.2 Digital Printing and Fabrication
340(1)
17.2.3 Augmented Reality and Immersive Environments
340(1)
17.3 How the New Technologies Are Intertwining
341(1)
17.4 When Do We Get the Holodeck?
341(2)
References
343(2)
Glossary 345(6)
Useful Links by Topic 351(2)
Design for All
351(1)
Important Blogs and Websites for Virtual Worlds
351(1)
Important Websites for Free or Low Cost Apps
351(1)
Important Websites for Tutorials and Techniques
351(1)
Important Locations in the Virtual Worlds for Tutorials and Examples to View
351(1)
Resources for Client Viewers and Sound Equipment
352(1)
Resources for OpenSim Hosting
352(1)
Resources for OpenSim Content
352(1)
Resources for Second Life Content
352(1)
Resources for Development
352(1)
Index 353