Learning Chinese: Linguistic, Sociocultural, and Narrative Perspectives [Kõva köide]

  • Formaat: Hardback, 322 pages, kõrgus x laius x paksus: 230x155x26 mm, kaal: 625 g, 18 Line drawings, black and white; 12 Halftones, black and white; 18 Tables, black and white
  • Sari: Trends in Applied Linguistics [TAL] 5
  • Ilmumisaeg: 18-Feb-2013
  • Kirjastus: Mouton de Gruyter
  • ISBN-10: 193407876X
  • ISBN-13: 9781934078761
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  • Formaat: Hardback, 322 pages, kõrgus x laius x paksus: 230x155x26 mm, kaal: 625 g, 18 Line drawings, black and white; 12 Halftones, black and white; 18 Tables, black and white
  • Sari: Trends in Applied Linguistics [TAL] 5
  • Ilmumisaeg: 18-Feb-2013
  • Kirjastus: Mouton de Gruyter
  • ISBN-10: 193407876X
  • ISBN-13: 9781934078761
Teised raamatud teemal:
The acquisition of Mandarin Chinese, one of the most important and widely spoken languages in the world today, is the focus of this innovative study. It describes the rise of Chinese as a global language and the many challenges and opportunities associated with learning it. The collaborative, multiple-case study and cross-case analysis is presented from three distinct but complementary theoretical and analytic perspectives: linguistic, sociocultural, and narrative. The book reveals fascinating dimensions of Chinese language learning based on vivid first-person accounts (with autobiographical narratives included in the book) of adults negotiating not only their own and others' language and literacy learning, but also their identities, communities, and trajectories as users of Chinese.

Patricia Duff, Tim Anderson, Roma Ilnyckyj, Ella VanGaya, Rachel Tianxuan Wang, Elliott Yates.
Preface v
List of figures
xiv
List of tables
xv
1 `China Rising': Chinese and Chinese Language Learning as Global Phenomena
1(32)
1.1 Introduction: China (and Chinese) rising
1(1)
1.2 Media portrayals of the rise of Chinese
1(3)
1.3 Complexities and politics of Chinese language(s) and literacies
4(4)
1.4 Cultural politics and ideologies surrounding Chinese language education, learning, and use
8(2)
1.5 Chinese language education: Pragmatic curricular issues
10(1)
1.6 Trends and gaps in Chinese language education and applied linguistics research
11(2)
1.7 Investigating Chinese language learning from multiple new perspectives
13(1)
1.8 Existing (auto)biographical accounts of learning Chinese
14(3)
1.9 Contemporary case studies in CAL on identity, ideologies, and narrativity
17(2)
1.10 Chinese as a heritage language
19(1)
1.11 New directions in Chinese language learning
20(1)
1.12 The study presented in this book
21(8)
1.12.1 Research methodology
22(1)
1.12.1.1 Participants
23(1)
1.12.1.2 Research design and procedures
23(1)
1.12.1.3 Triangulating epistemic stances: "Insiders" and "outsiders"
23(2)
1.12.1.4 Procedures and timeline for data collection and analysis
25(1)
1.12.1.5 Description of research procedures and process
25(4)
1.13 Organization of this book
29(4)
2 Developing Chinese Proficiency: Linguistic Perspectives
33(45)
2.1 Introduction: Researching Chinese language learners' development
33(1)
2.2 Existing research on linguistic dimensions of Chinese as an additional language
34(3)
2.2.1 Linguistic approaches
34(2)
2.2.2 Linguistic development in sociocultural and phenomenological (narrative) accounts of Chinese SLA
36(1)
2.3 CAL participants' linguistic profiles
37(8)
2.3.1 Overview
37(1)
2.3.1.1 Ella's language background
37(1)
2.3.1.2 Elliott's language background
37(1)
2.3.1.3 Patsy's language background
38(1)
2.3.1.4 Roma's language background
38(1)
2.3.1.5 Tim's language background
39(1)
2.3.1.6 Summary of participants' language backgrounds
39(1)
2.3.2 Formally assessing and describing CAL proficiency
39(3)
2.3.3 Proficiency self-assessments
42(3)
2.4 Oral proficiency
45(30)
2.4.1 Challenges in learning to speak Chinese
45(1)
2.4.1.1 The challenge of dialects in CAL
45(3)
2.4.1.2 The challenge of tones in CAL
48(1)
2.4.2 The CAL proficiency interviews
49(1)
2.4.2.1 Interview structure
50(1)
2.4.2.2 Transcription of interviews
50(1)
2.4.2.3 Contextualizing the proficiency interviews in relation to learner background, learning contexts, and interview context
51(1)
2.4.2.4 Rachel's observations
52(3)
2.4.2.5 Quantitative analysis and linguistic comparison of group's interview data
55(14)
2.4.3 Qualitative analysis of oral proficiency data: Grammatical variety analysis
69(1)
2.4.3.1 Morpheme analysis: Semantic and grammatical functions and constructions
70(4)
2.4.3.2 Issues with qualitative analysis of grammatical competency
74(1)
2.5 Summary of linguistic analysis of proficiency, development, and variation
75(3)
3 Developing Everyday Chinese Literacies: Sinographic Choices, Practices, and Identities
78(24)
3.1 Introduction
78(1)
3.2 Chinese orthography and literacy: Investments, practices, and identities
78(2)
3.3 Contexts for and commitments to acquiring Chinese character-based literacy
80(2)
3.4 Developing advanced Chinese literacy
82(3)
3.5 Literacy as mediated social practice
85(3)
3.6 Writing, technology, and literate/textual identities, choices, and practices
88(11)
3.6.1 Ella's transcriptions
90(1)
3.6.2 Elliott's transcriptions
91(2)
3.6.3 Patsy's transcriptions
93(3)
3.6.4 Roma's transcriptions
96(1)
3.6.5 Tim's transcriptions
97(2)
3.7 Summary
99(3)
4 Sociocultural Approaches to Chinese Language Learning and Research: Negotiating Identities and Communities
102(39)
4.1 Introduction: Exploring identity and community in socioculturally-oriented Chinese language learning research
102(11)
4.1.1 Traditional and contemporary approaches to research: The sociocultural imperative in SLA
103(3)
4.1.2 Sociocultural theory and SLA
106(1)
4.1.3 Identity
107(1)
4.1.3.1 Identity(ies) as multiple, situated, fluid
107(1)
4.1.3.2 Emic versus etic perspectives on identity
108(1)
4.1.3.3 Identity in heritage versus non-heritage learners of Chinese
109(1)
4.1.4 Community
110(3)
4.2 Thematic analysis of narratives: Procedures and priorities
113(26)
4.2.1 CAL in relation to community engagements
114(2)
4.2.2 Agency
116(1)
4.2.2.1 Agency, identities, and communities
117(8)
4.2.3 Positioning
125(1)
4.2.3.1 Positioning and race
126(2)
4.2.3.2 Positioning, identities, and communities
128(1)
4.2.3.3 Positioning, laowai, and English
129(4)
4.2.4 Gender
133(2)
4.2.4.1 Gender and communities
135(4)
4.3 Summary
139(2)
5 Narrative and Metanarrative Perspectives on Learning, Researching, and Theorizing Chinese as an Additional Language
141(39)
5.1 Introduction: Narrative inquiry in second language research
141(6)
5.1.1 Purpose and procedures of (meta)narrative analysis
143(2)
5.1.2 Becoming participant-researchers in a CAL community of practice
145(2)
5.2 Stage 1: Narrative generation process
147(7)
5.2.1 Approach, genre, voice, and style in Narrative One (N1)
150(4)
5.3 Stage 2: Reciprocal and collective annotation of narratives
154(14)
5.3.1 Coding comments on Narrative One
158(1)
5.3.2 Analyzing comments on Narrative One
158(8)
5.3.3 Metanarrative activity as community building and theory building
166(2)
5.4 Stage 3: Writing, analyzing, and theorizing SLA in Narrative Two (N2)
168(6)
5.4.1 Narrative Two prefaces as personal metanarrative reflection
170(1)
5.4.2 Analyzing Narrative Two: Focus group discussion vis-a-vis written annotation
171(3)
5.5 Stage 4: Collaborative research and writing with digital aids
174(1)
5.6 Creation and inclusion of Narrative Three (N3) in this book
174(1)
5.7 Some final reflections: The benefits and limitations of the (meta)narrative research
175(5)
5.7.1 Benefits
175(2)
5.7.2 Limitations and constraints
177(3)
6 Conclusion: Reflections on Research in Chinese as an Additional Language
180(17)
6.1 Exploring diverse approaches to research in CAL
180(1)
6.2 Recurring themes in CAL and in our study
181(6)
6.2.1 Descriptions of language proficiency
181(3)
6.2.2 Literacy
184(1)
6.2.3 Negotiating identities and communities
185(2)
6.3 Triangulating, reconciling, and interrogating diverse perspectives, experiences, and methods for analyzing CAL
187(3)
6.4 Limitations and reflections
190(1)
6.5 Pedagogical and policy implications
191(2)
6.6 Future research directions and possibilities
193(1)
6.7 Conclusion: Learning Chinese as a global and cosmopolitan language
194(3)
Appendices
197(106)
Appendix A CAL Learners' Narratives
199(102)
Preface
199(1)
Ella's Narrative (N3)
200(24)
Elliott's Narrative (N3)
224(20)
Patsy's Narrative (N3)
244(20)
Roma's Narrative (N3)
264(19)
Tim's Narrative (N3)
283(18)
Appendix B Sample Questions for Chinese Proficiency Interview (2009, 2010)
301(2)
References 303(14)
Index 317
Patricia Duff, Tim Anderson, Roma Ilnyckyj, Ella VanGaya,Rachel Tianxuan Wang, Elliott Yates.